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Full text of "Manual for the General Court"

3 1833 01774 6972 



GENEALOGY 
974.2 
M319 
1917 



Printed and Bound by 

JOHN B. CLARKE CO. 

Manchester, N. H. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/manualforgeneralOOnewh 








Governor HENRY W. KEYES. 



State of New Hampshire 

MANUAL 

for the 

GENERAL COURT 
1917 



Prepared and published by the 
Department of State at Concord 



Edwin C. Bean of Belmont 

Secretary of State 

Hobart Pillsbury of Manchester 

Deputy Secretary of State 
No. 15 



INTRODUCTION. 



This manual, number fifteen in the series of Red Books, is 
an official state publication of New Hampshire, issued by the 
Department of State and designed for the use of the legislature 
of 1917. An attempt has been made to gather information 
of an historical character in this book which has never before 
been compiled. The previous fourteen numbers of this publi- 
cation, issued biennially, have contained the roster of officials 
then in office, the election returns, the constitution, and occa- 
sionally some data of a special character. 

This volume is divided into nine sections. The first section 
is introductory and descriptive. The second section contains 
brief histories of the state, and its several subdivisions. Offi- 
cial sources, such as the state and provincial papers, the rec- 
ords of the governor and council and the journals of the 
legislature, have been almost exclusively employed in gathering 
the facts and figures. Each town history, after it was pre- 
pared, was submitted to the librarian of the town library or 
to the town clerk for verification and possible improvement. 
The third section is statistical. Its facts and figures were 
obtained partly from official state records and partly from the 
census bureau of the federal government. The fourth section 
concerns the constitution. An account of its developments, 
secured from the journals of proceedings of the several con- 
stitutional conventions, is given. The fifth part contains the 
succession in office of all the state officers from the begin- 
ning. The offices and departments are arranged in chrono- 
logical order according to their creation. The sixth part is 
federal and contains facts and figures secured from official 
records. Here will be found the official returns of the presi- 
dential primaries of last year. The seventh part is political. 
The history of the organization of the political parties only 
includes those that cast three per cent of the votes and are 
officially recognized. The eighth part contains the primary 
and election returns of last year. The ninth part contains the 
organization of the government at the present time. The leg- 
islative committees are not included but may be found in the 
legislative manual published in black binding. 



ERRATA. 

P. 182. Add name of Rufus M. Weeks as Senator from District No. 14. 
P. 226. 1916 vote for Presidential Electors 43,781 and 43,725 instead 

of 43,787 and 43,724. 
P. 335 and 391. (First Senatorial District) total for Marble 943 instead 

of 1,448, and for Daley 1,375 instead of 1,675. Plurality for 

Daley 432 instead of 227. 
P. 367. David instead of Daniel W. Coffey. 

P. 400. Vote for Hart in Farmington was 423 instead of 433. 
P. 461. Chief Justice Pike died January 9, 1917. 



GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION. 

New Hampshire is situated the most northern of the thirteen 
original states and lies between latitude 42-40 and 45-18 
north and longitude 70-37 and 72-37 west. It is about 180 
miles long and 50 miles wide, although the extreme width is 
93 miles. 

It is bounded on the north by Quebec province in Canada, 
on the east by Maine and the Atlantic ocean, on the south by 
Massachusetts, and on the west by Vermont. The Connecti- 
cut river is the western boundary, and at the present time 
(1916) there is legal controversy to determine this exact 
boundary. 

"MOTHER OF RIVERS." 

Geographies sometimes speak of the state as the "Mother of 
Rivers." Five of the great streams of New England originate 
in its granite hills. The Connecticut river rises in the north- 
ern part, and for nearly one hundred miles of its winding 
course hems the shores of the state with a "broad seam of 
silver." The Pemigewasset river starts in the Profile lake in 
the Franconia mountains and joins the Winnipesaukee at 
Franklin to form the Merrimack, which is said to turn more 
spindles than any river in the world. The Cocheco and 
Salmon Falls rivers join at Dover to form the Piscataqua. 
In addition, two of the principal rivers of Maine, the Andro- 
scoggin and the Saco, have their beginnings in northern New 
Hampshire. 

"THE GRANITE STATE." 

New Hampshire is commonly known as the Granite State, 
and of late years by some writers is called the Queen State — 
"Queen by right of her natural beauty; queen by her native 
hardy spirit; queen by her diversified industry; queen by 
reason of her motherhood of great men. She is enthroned 
on hills of granite, diademed with sparkling waters and scep- 
tered with industry." 

The state entertains annually over two hundred thousand 
summer visitors, who resort in the mountain, lake and sea- 
shore scenery. The soil is suitable for fruits, flowers and 
vegetables. The forests of pine, spruce and hard wood add 
beauty to the landscape and wealth to the land. 



D NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

The White Mountains are the natural feature which has the 
widest fame. There are over two hundred bodies of water, 
which cover one hundred and fifteen thousand acres and vary 
from small ponds to Lake Winnipesaukee, which is twenty-two 
miles long and eight miles wide. 

No state grows apples of finer flavor than come from the 
hillsides of New Hampshire. Horticultural shows have no 
better exhibits than are presented from towns in the south- 
ern part of this state, where the orchards have been sprayed 
and treated by scientific methods. Strawberries, blueberries, 
peaches and products of the garden are grown in great 
quantities and shipped hundreds of miles. 

Dairying is a large business and in recent years the quality 
of the herds has increased almost twofold. There are 5,779,- 
840 acres of land in the state and about three fifths of it is 
farm land, with the number of farms estimated at nearly thirty 
thousand. There are over two and one half million acres of 
timber land, which contain over thirty thousand million feet 
of merchantable timber. 



FINE SUMMER RESORTS. 

It is estimated that every year more than two million dol- 
lars is permanently invested in the purchase of land and the 
construction of buildings in the rural districts. Nearly every 
town has some summer visitors. Winnipesaukee shores are 
lined with cottages and hotels; Sunapee has a summer popu- 
lation of over five thousand, who enjoy its beauties. 

The state has a seaboard of about eighteen miles. Hamp- 
ton and Rye beaches have been famous summer resorts since 
the days Whittier pitched his "tent on the beach." The salt 
waves of the Atlantic lap the sometimes sandy, sometimes 
rocky coast into one continuous pleasure ground, where surf 
bathing and scenic beauty enchant the visitor. In the early 
fall of 1915 a disastrous fire at Hampton Beach destroyed 
many of the hotels and places of business there, but the 
resort has since been rebuilt from the ruins until it is larger 
and more attractive than ever. 

Portsmouth, the only sea city, has an historic past and a 
prosperous present with its large navy yard. Newcastle is a 
place of romance and aesthetic beauty and adventure. A 
large part of the Isles of Shoals in Portsmouth harbor belong 
*to New Hampshire, with their cottages and hotels. The state 
^boulevards for automobiles and a belt line of electric railway 
service connect the water resorts with the inland country. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 7 

FISH AND GAME. 

In 1865 New Hampshire joined the vanguard of American 
science by establishing a fish and game department, the first 
one of its kind in New England. Since that date, some fifty 
years ago, the efforts of this department have been devoted to 
the propagation and conservation of fish and game. 

In modern times the cultivation of fish and the protection 
of wild life have demanded the application of scientific meth- 
ods quite as much as any other element of our life. It is a 
known fact that while European countries have found vast 
resources in their shore fisheries, the United States is by no 
means able to rely on her coast fisheries, and has thus been 
obliged to develop her inland waters to meet the needs that 
otherwise could have been met only by importation from other 
countries. Moreover, while Europe's supply is bound to lessen 
in time to come, our supply will continue to increase. 

Herein lies the purpose of the state department of fish and 
game, to see that New Hampshire stands in the van, not in the 
rear, of developing her natural resources. 

The state department is using many methods. In the first 
place, it is trying to secure the co-operation of the people, 
without which no department can succeed. It advocates the 
formation of sportsmen's clubs; already there are twenty-six 
active ones in the state. 

It is securing legislation to avert the destruction of the life 
of our waters and fields. It is struggling for the conservation 
of all desirable living things. It has established a new hatch- 
ery, from which five million fishes were distributed last spring 
to every suitable body of water in the state. It is establish- 
ing game refuges and introducing new game birds into the 

"COME TO NEW HAMPSHIRE." 

New Hampshire believes in progress and development in 
every direction. She invites the whole world to visit her 
mountains, the "playground of America." Those seeking op- 
portunity for profitable farming will do well to write for 
further information to the Commissioner of Agriculture, Con- 
cord, N. H.; sportsmen are invited to send for literature and 
advice to the Fish and Game Commissioner, Concord, N. H.; 
those looking for business openings, either in manufacturing 
enterprises or in the retail field, should correspond with the 
New Hampshire Board of Trade, Concord, N. H. 

The Boston & Maine Railroad Publicity Bureau at Bos- 
ton, Mass., the New Hampshire Manufacturers' Association and 
the New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord, N. H., are 
other sources from whom information not given in this vol- 
ume may be secured. 



O NEW HAMPSHIKE MANUAL. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

New Hampshire was one of the thirteen original colonies 
which revolted from English rule and founded the United 
States of America, one hundred and forty years ago. When 
this continent was settled New Hampshire was a part of a 
grant made in 1620 by James I, King of England, to the 
Plymouth company, a commercial organization formed to de- 
velop the "new world." This was two hundred and ninety- 
six years ago. 

The name of New Hampshire was first given to this section 
of the country in 1629, when the Plymouth company gave a 
grant of part of its colonial possessions to Captain John Mason, 
a gentleman of Hampshire in England. New Hampshire in 
those days was roughly described as "that part of the main 
land of New England" between the Merrimack and Piscataqua 
rivers. It was more than a hundred years before the bound- 
aries of the province of New Hampshire were definitely fixed, 
but once settled upon, in 1740 on the south and east and in 
1764 on the west, these lines have remained practically intact 
to this day. There is, however, a long-standing dispute now 
in progress between New Hampshire and Vermont over the 
boundary line, a difference of opinion aggravated by the chang- 
ing bed of the Connecticut river. 

In 1622 a grant of part of New Hampshire was given by 
patent to Captain Mason and a partner, Sir Ferdinand Gorges, 
by the council of Plymouth. Robert Gorges was appointed 
the first governor, and he came to America two years later and 
assumed his office. Five years later the patent of Laconia 
was granted to a company of traders, but the extent of the 
company's jurisdiction was not definitely settled upon. 

In 1629, the same year that the Laconian patent was 
granted, Captain Mason and his partner reached an agreement 
whereby Captain Mason took over the whole of New Hamp- 
shire and relinquished to his partner his rights on territory 
in Maine east of the Piscataqua river. The Council of 
Plymouth confirmed this division of territory. 

In 1635 the Council of Plymouth re-issued its patent to 
Mason and then dissolved. A document purporting to be a 
charter directly from the king of England to Captain Mason, 
issued that same year, giving the captain the New Hamp- 
shire territory then held by him, is in existence, but whether 
or not this document is authentic is a question among his- 
torians. 

The first settlement in New Hampshire was in Rye (then 
called "Little Harbor" and afterwards called Portsmouth), in 
1623, the second settlement at Dover in 1628, the third at 
Exeter in 1638 and the fourth at Hampton in 1639. The 
objects of these adventurers into the primitive wilderness of 
New Hampshire were to clear the land for cultivation, to seek 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 9 

for the mineral wealth which was supposed to exist, to estab- 
lish and carry on fisheries on the rivers, which teemed with 
fish, and along the coast, and to barter with the native In- 
dian tribes of the locality. 

The Massachusetts colonists had come to America to found 
settlements where they might have freedom in religious wor- 
ship — a freedom which, however, they were unwilling to grant 
to any not of their faith. It was a day when religious opin- 
ions were paramount, and politics and legislation were sub- 
ordinate, when creeds claimed precedence over rights. Un- 
less a person subscribed unreservedly to the established creed 
he was a heretic. In such a class were the Quakers, Roger 
Williams, Anne Hutchinson and her brother-in-law, Rev. John 
Wheelwright, a man of superior endowments and high 
culture, who, disenfranchised and banished from Massachu- 
setts, led forty of his exiled adherents into the wilderness of 
New Hampshire and settled Exeter in July, 1638. 

Underlying these early settlements was a deep religious 
conviction, perhaps not so radical as in Massachusetts, but 
still present, which again manifests itself when the people of 
the state, while formulating a frame of government, gave the 
religious idea so prominent a place in the Bill of Rights. 

CAPTAIN MASON'S EFFORTS. 

Charles I, for political and religious reasons, had granted 
Mason extraordinary rights and privileges. Mason had been 
not only a faithful adherent of the king, but also a devout 
and zealous supporter of the Church of England. It was in- 
evitable therefore that his ideas of government and religion 
should be distasteful to the Massachusetts colonists so near 
at hand. 

Mason's colony was, however, solely a business venture. 
He established no government over it. The settlements were 
under the immediate direction of agents commissioned by and 
answerable to the proprietor. They were ruled as a body of 
workmen are ruled — just as the Hudson Bay Company gov- 
erns through its factors. 

Mason died in 1635, and while his early efforts to occupy 
the lands allotted to him were persevering and meritorious, 
the founding of colonies was a matter requiring the ex- 
penditure of large sums of money, of which neither Mason nor 
his descendants had command, and his plans with regard to 
the colonization of New Hampshire failed of execution. 

There was no provincial government in those days, but each 
town maintained its own government. Religious differences 
prevented as years went on the development of a central gov- 
ernment, and in 1641 the New Hampshire towns resigned their 
jurisdiction to Massachusetts and became a part of Norfolk 
county of that province. 



10 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

BECOMES ROYAL PROVINCE, 1679. 

After thirty-eight years as a part of Massachusetts, New- 
Hampshire became a province of itself in 1679 by an order of 
the king of England, which was preceded by a decree of the 
English courts to the effect that Massachusetts had no right to 
extend its jurisdiction over New Hampshire. 

King Charles II issued a commission to John Cutts of Ports- 
mouth in that year to be president of the province and to gov- 
ern it under the king, with the aid of a council and assembly. 
This was the real beginning of constitutional government in 
this territory, which has continued without serious interruption 
to the present time. 

The commission of the king reserved to him the right to 
veto all the acts of the provincial legislature and the right to 
dissolve the legislature at his pleasure. The New Hampshire 
settlers did not like this arrangement as well as they did the 
jurisdiction of Massachusetts. 

The governors sent to the province by the king proved to 
be avaricious tyrants. Even the Lords of Trade in England 
would not uphold them in some of their actions, and time and 
again, at the instigation of the heirs of Captain Mason (the 
Masonian Proprietors, so called) the royal governors tried to 
force the people to surrender their titles to lands and take 
leases from the Masonian Proprietors. 

THE MASONIAN CONTROVERSY. 

In 169 the people, mindful of their former pleasant rela- 
tions with Massachusetts, resolved on a second union with 
their old ally, and sent a petition to William and Mary of 
England. 

Through the influence of Samuel Allen, who had bought out 
the interests of the Mason heirs, the king failed to grant 
this request, and the union, which had been accepted by Mas- 
sachusetts, was short lived. 

Allen was appointed governor and his son-in-law became 
his deputy. In this way were the claims of Mason's heirs, 
so abhorrent to the people, continued until the death of Al- 
len's son early in the reign of Queen Anne. These suits and 
claims were finally settled in 1787 by compromise. 

"There is probably no controversy on record that involved 
so many parties, continued so many years, and created so 
many lawsuits as Mason's claim to New Hampshire. Kings 
and queens, nobles and plebeians, proprietors and counsellors, 
courts and legislatures for nearly a century were constantly 
agitating the question of the right of soil of this wild, rough 
and rocky state. Generation after generation of claimants 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 11 

died, but the controversy lived. Judges of the king's bench 
and of the state courts again and again decided cases at issue, 
but still the spirits which avarice had conjured up would not 
down at their bidding. The people outlived their prosecutors 
and the fire went out for want of fuel." (Sanborn, History 
of New Hampshire.) 

For forty-three years, from 1698 until 1741, New Hamp- 
shire and Massachusetts were under the same governor, al- 
though each province maintained its identity. At the expira- 
tion of this period a new arrangement was made by which 
New Hampshire had one of its own sons, Benning Wentworth, 
appointed governor, and the provincial legislature was given 
increased authority. 

THE WENTWORTHS, GOVERNORS. 

He served for twenty-six years during an era of good feel- 
ing such as the colony had never before known. He was a 
benefactor of Moor's Indian School, which under his succes- 
sor was chartered as Dartmouth college. 

He was succeeded by his nephew, John Wentworth, in 176 7, 
who also was well received by the people and by the assembly. 
As governor, he granted a charter to Dartmouth college and 
endowed it with forty-five thousand acres of land. 

"He was universally beloved by the people. He had uni- 
formly endeavored to promote the general public welfare by 
encouraging commerce, constructing highways, establishing 
courts and fostering learning." (Sanborn.) 

But in 1774, as representative of King George III, he as- 
sisted General Gage in his work on fortifications in Boston. 
This brought down upon him the intense dislike of the revo- 
lutionary party and he fled from the state to Boston, where 
he might have the protection of General Gage. Still retaining 
the title of governor, he returned for a time to Fort William 
and Mary, from which place he issued a proclamation dissolv- 
ing the assembly and shortly afterward set sail for England. 
He was the last of royal governors. 

Before Governor Wentworth quit, the provincial legislature 
took official action in regard to the revolution, and a commit- 
tee of safety was organized. This committee summoned a 
revolutionary assembly, which met in Exeter and was known 
as the First Provincial Congress. Four other congresses of 
similar character followed. 

The last meeting of the old provincial assembly took place 
in 1775. The same year the American Continental Congress 
gave the New Hampshire revolutionists the right to set up a 
new government. 



12 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR. 

About one half of the soldiers at the Battle of Bunker Hill 
were New Hampshire troops under the command of such lead- 
ers as John Stark, James Reid and Enoch Poor. Throughout 
the struggle for independence the revolutionary state govern- 
ment, under the direction of the committee of safety, of which 
Meshech Weare was president, furnished troops in large 
numbers. 

General John Sullivan distinguished himself on many battle- 
fields, and General Stark's exploits at Bennington is an inci- 
dent of renown. It was largely the New Hampshire forces 
which brought about the surrender of Burgoyne. 

With the close of the Revolution this state entered actively 
into the organization of the federal government. John Lang- 
don, one of the early governors, was the first president of the 
United States senate, and was nominated for vice-president of 
the nation. 

In 1780 a petition by the slaves for freedom was circulated 
in this state. Dartmouth college began to develop about that 
time and the legislature gave the college the right to raise 
money by a lottery. In 1792 the first bank was chartered to 
do business, and the year before the State Medical Society 
was founded, with Governor Joseph Bartlett at its head. In 
1796 the first turnpike and state highway from Concord to 
Portsmouth was chartered. 

SECOND WAR WITH ENGLAND. 

When the second war with England broke out in 1812 Gov- 
ernor John Langdon drafted thirty-five hundred men at the 
request of the president. The state militia at that time was 
in its most flourishing condition and consisted of three divi- 
sions, six brigades and thirty-seven regiments. 

William Plumer succeeded to the governorship before hos- 
tilities had advanced, and he organized the first regiment of 
New Hampshire volunteers, which later became part of the 
regular army. In 1813 there was a political overturn, in 
which former Governor John T. Gilman defeated Governor 
Plumer for re-election. Governor Gilman was head of the 
Federalist party in the state, and its return to power Was 
celebrated by abolishing the courts and turning out the judges 
and other officers. The Federalists were opposed to the war, 
but all the people, regardless of party, became afraid of Eng- 
lish invasion and were solid in defense of the state. The 
inhabitants of Portsmouth in particular were frightened on 
several occasions of a British landing and attack, and Gov- 
ernor Gilman summoned the entire militia to the defense of 
that city. 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 13 

A native of New Hampshire, Lewis Cass of Exeter, achieved 
military distinction in Michigan. He was later a senator from 
that state, candidate for the presidency in 1848 and then sec- 
retary of state under Buchanan. In 1814 a secessionary gath- 
ering was held at Hartford, Connecticut, at which delegates 
were present from most of the New England states. Gov- 
ernor Gilman was blocked in his efforts to secure New Hamp- 
shire representation at the convention by three of his 
councilors, who were Democrats. 

DARTMOUTH "UNIVERSITY." 

In 1815 a very destructive tempest occurred. That same 
year there was a political tempest, when former Governor 
Plumer was returned to power and the judges and office- 
holders were again addressed out of office. The state house 
was located on its present site during the 1815 administration. 
A controversy arose over Dartmouth college, which for several 
years was a paramount issue in state politics. The legislature 
changed the name to Dartmouth University and reorganized 
the government of the institution, but the United States Su- 
preme Court ruled that the legislature could not overturn a 
charter that had been granted by the king. 

In 1817 President James Monroe visited the state, and there 
was an era of political good feeling which lasted for many 
years. In 1819 the use of the power-loom was commenced at 
the Amoskeag Mills in Manchester, and from that time these 
mills developed until they became the largest in the world. 
A most destructive freshet in 1824 destroyed the bridges over 
the Merrimack river and damaged a good deal of property. 

General Lafayette visited the state in 1824 and was received 
with the greatest enthusiasm. In 18 33 President Andrew 
Jackson rode on horseback into Concord, accompanied by his 
vice-president, Martin Van Buren, his secretary of war, Lewis 
Cass, who was a native of Exeter; and his secretary of the 
navy, Levi Woodbury of Portsmouth. Partisan feeling was 
bitter in those days and the celebration was indulged in 
principally by Democrats. 

DEVELOPMENT OF INDUSTRY. 

In 1835 and subsequent years railroads were chartered and 
constructed in all parts of the state and a period of great 
commercial development was inaugurated. This led to the 
growth of several towns on the railroad into cities. Chief 
among these was Manchester, which had a fortunate location 
at Amoskeag Falls, and in 1846 it was incorporated as a city. 

The war with Mexico broke out that year, and although 



14 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

there was no great enthusiasm for the war in New Hampshire, 
many sons of the state, such as Franklin Pierce, John Bedell 
and Dr. John D. Walker, took a prominent part in the mili- 
tary activities. After the war many other young men emi- 
grated to the fertile prairies of the West. 

In 1850 the entire expenses of the legislative, executive and 
judicial departments of the state government amounted to 
only $36,000. During that year a convention was held to 
revise the Constitution, and Franklin Pierce was its president. 
Two years later he was elected president of the United States, 
receiving the support of every state in the Union but four. 

Before the Pierce administration was through the Demo- 
cratic party lost control of New Hampshire. In 1855 the 
American or Know-Nothing party elected Ralph Metcalf gov- 
ernor and John P. Hale senator. From this party there de- 
veloped the Republican organization, which was in power 
through the Civil War and for nearly twenty years after. 
St. Paul's School in Concord was opened in 1856 and is one 
of the most select preparatory institutions in the country. 

38,945 MEN IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

In 1861 the Civil War broke out. During the first year of 
the war New Hampshire sent eight regiments of infantry to 
the front, and during the second year nine more, and in 1864 
still another. Altogether about thirty-nine thousand men went 
from this state to fight for the preservation of the union. 
Nineteen hundred were killed in action or died of wounds, 
twenty-five hundred died of disease and two hundred and 
eighty-five were missing. About sixteen hundred men re-en- 
listed after their first term of service. 

In 1866 a railroad was built up Mount Washington. The 
following year the department of public instruction was estab- 
lished and from that time the state has enjoyed universal 
common school education. In 1874 the Democratic party ob- 
tained control of all branches of the government for the first 
time since the war, and there was a complete overturn in 
offices. In 1878 there was a revision of the laws of the state, 
the new prison was built and the militia was reorganized. 
Biennial elections were substituted for annual elections by 
an amendment to the Constitution that year. In 1887 there 
took place a very bitter railroad struggle in the legislature 
between the Concord railroad and the Boston & Maine rail- 
road. This was followed by an organization of the Boston 
& Maine system throughout northern New England on a 
basis of leases, the New Hampshire railroads all leasing to the 
Boston and Maine. An attempt to reorganize the railroad 
by modifying or breaking the leases in 1915 and 1916 failed, 
and in the latter year the road went into receivership. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



15 



The history of the state since 1888 is within the memory 
of the generation now living and. to recite it would be beyond, 
the scope of this legislative manual, which is designed more 
to preserve facts concerning the early days of the state's his- 
tory. For the past thirty years New Hampshire has grown in 
every way. Her industries have flourished, her population 
has increased, her churches, schools and colleges have ex- 
panded, and her attractions as a summer resort have become 
known to all the world. 

THE COUNTIES. 

When New Hampshire was a part of the colony of Mas- 
sachusetts Bay, from 1641 to 1679, the principal towns of 
New Hampshire were part of Norfolk county in Massachusetts. 
New Hampshire did not divide herself into counties, how- 
ever, until 1769, six years before the Revolution. In that 
year the five counties of Rockingham, Strafford, Hillsborough, 
Cheshire and Grafton were established. 

Coos was the sixth county established in 18 OS. Merrimack 
and Sullivan were established on the same day in 1827, and 
Belknap and Carroll on the same day in 1840. Since the 
original division into counties the legislature on twenty occa- 
sions has amended and changed the layout. The following 
is a list of counties in their customary order, giving the name 
of each, the date of its establishment and the place of the 
county seat. 



Name. 


Date. 


County Seat. 


Rockingham 


1769 


Exeter 


Strafford 


1769 


Dover 


Belknap 


1840 


Laconia 


Carroll 


1840 


Ossipee 


Merrimack 


1827 


Concord 


Hillsborough 


, 1769 


Nashua 


Cheshire 


1769 


Keene 


Sullivan 


1827 


Newport 


Grafton 


1769 


Haverhill 


Coos 


1803 


Lancaster 



Rockingham county is in the southeastern part of the state 
and was the first part settled. It was named for the Marquis 
of Rockingham and includes the city of Portsmouth and thirty- 
six towns. 

Strafford county is in the eastern part of the state, north 
of Rockingham county. It was named for the Earl of Straf- 
ford and includes three cities and ten towns. 



16 NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 

Belknap county takes in the lake region in the central 
part of the state. It was named for Dr. Jeremy Belknap, who 
wrote a history of the state, and includes the city of Laconia 
and ten towns. 

Carroll county is in the east central part of the state and is 
sparsely settled. It was named for Charles Carroll of Carroll- 
ton, Virginia, who signed the Declaration of Independence, 
and includes eighteen towns. 

Merrimack county is in the Merrimack river region in the 
south central part of the state. It was named for the river 
and includes two cities and twenty-five towns. 

Hillsborough county is in the south central part of the state 
and is the most thickly populated. It was named for the 
Earl of Hillsborough, a councilor of King George III, and in- 
cludes two cities and twenty-nine towns. 

Cheshire county is in the southwestern corner of the state, 
and at the time the state government was organized there was 
some controversy over whether the territory now embraced in 
the county belonged to New Hampshire or Vermont. It was 
named for Cheshire county in England and includes the city 
of Keene and twenty-two towns. 

Sullivan county is in the west central part of the state, 
and like Cheshire County, was embroiled in early boundary 
disputes. It was named for John Sullivan, a general in the 
Revolutionary army and later governor, and includes fifteen 
towns. 

Grafton county is in the northwestern part of the state and 
large parts of it are sparsely settled. It was named for an 
English nobleman and includes thirty-nine towns. 

Coos county is in the northern part of the state and is the 
largest county. It was named after an Indian word meaning 
"crooked," and was so called on account of the bend in the 
Connecticut river. It has an area of about a million acres 
and includes the city of Berlin and twenty towns. 

THE CITIES. 

Berlin was granted in 1771 to Sir William Mayne and others 
and named "Maynesborough" in honor of the grantee. The 
first settlement was made in 1821 by William Sessions. In 
1829 the town was incorporated and the name changed to 
Berlin after the capital of Germany. In 1897 it became a 
city and is the most northern city in the state. In 1902 an 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 17 

electric railroad was built to Gorham. Coos county, second 
congressional, first councilor and first senatorial districts. 
Population, 11,780. 

Concord was originally known as "Penacook" and was 
granted by the Massachusetts Colony in 16 59 to Richard 
Waldron and others. It was regranted by the same author- 
ity in 1725 to Ebenezer Eastman and others, and he was the 
first settler in 1727. The town was incorporated in 1733 by 
Massachusetts and the name changed to "Rumford." It was 
reincorporated in 1765 by New Hampshire and the name 
changed to Concord. There was a long standing dispute be- 
tween New Hampshire's grant of 1727 and the Massachusetts 
grant, which the king settled in 1762 in favor of "Rumford." 
Parts of Canterbury and Loudon were annexed in 1784 and 
part of Bow in 1804. Concord became the seat of govern- 
ment about 1800. The first state capitol was built in 1816 
and remodeled in 186 5, and the legislature has met in it since 
1819. Concord became a city in 1853. Part of Bow was an- 
nexed in 1856. Merrimack county, second congressional, fifth 
councilor and seventh, ninth and fifteenth senatorial districts. 
Population, 21,497. 

Dover was settled in 1623 and was originally called "Hil- 
ton's Point" from the name of one of the first settlers, Edward 
Hilton. Later the name "Northam" was given it, and finally 
Dover, after an English town. The settlement at the falls of 
the river, now the compact part of the city, was called "Co- 
checo," an Indian word meaning foaming water. Dover suf- 
fered severely at the hands of the Indians through its early 
history, and in 1689, when Major Richard Waldron was in 
command of the militia, became the victim of a massacre which 
nearly destroyed the settlement. In 1713 Newington was set 
off as a parish; in 1729, Somersworth; in 1732, Durham; and 
in 1755, Madbury. In 1792 the legislature met here. Dover 
became a city in 1855. Part of Rollinsford was annexed in 
1879. Strafford county, first congressional, second councilor 
and twenty-first senatorial districts. Population, 13,247. 

Franklin was incorporated in 1828 from parts of Andover, 
Salisbury, Northfield and Sanbornton and was named in honor 
of Benjamin Franklin. The first settlers were John Webster 
and Ezekiel Webster in 1759. Part of Franklin was annexed 
to Salisbury in 1869. It became a city in 1895, and is the 
smallest city in the state. Merrimack county, second con- 
gressional, fifth councilor and seventh senatorial districts. 
Population, 6,132. 

Keene was granted in 1733 by the Massachusetts colony and 
named "Upper Ashuelot." Early settlements were made, 



18 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



which were abandoned in 1746 on account of Indian raids, and 
the first permanent settlements were in 1750. The town was 
incorporated in 1753 and the name changed to Keene in honor 
of Sir Benjamin Keene. The northeastern part of the town 
was put into the incorporation of Sullivan in 1787 and another 
part, together with parts of Nelson and Marlborough, went to 
make up the incorporation of Roxbury in 1812. In the same 
year part of Swanzey was annexed to Keene. In 1794 part 
of Keene was annexed to Sullivan. In 1865 Keene refused 
to accept a city charter, but in 1873 accepted one. Cheshire 
county, second congressional, fourth councilor and tenth sena- 
torial districts. Population, 10,068. ' 

Laconia was set off from Meredith in 1855 and incorporated. 
Part of Gilford was annexed in 1874 and part of Laconia an- 
nexed to Gilford two years later. It became a city in 1893. 
Belknap county, first congressional, fifth councilor and sixth 
senatorial districts. Population, 10,183. 

Manchester was originally known as "Harrytown" or "Old 
Harry Town." The place was granted by the Masonian Pro- 
prietors in 1735 to the "Snow-shoe men" of Captain William 
Tyng and the name changed to "Tyng's Town." In 1751 
it was incorporated and the name changed to "Derryfield." 
The first town meeting was held in the house of John Hall that 
same year. In 1795 a gore of land was annexed on the north 
side. In 1810 the name was changed to Manchester, after the 
cotton center of England. In 1846 it became a city and is 
now the largest city in the state. In 1853 the village of 
"Amoskeag" was severed from Goffstown and annexed, and 
the village of "Squog" from Bedford, so that Manchester now 
takes in territory on both sides of the Merrimack river. At- 
tempts to annex more territory from Bedford, Goffstown and 
Hooksett in the legislature of 1915 were unsuccessful. Ef- 
forts to make this the capital were unsuccessful in 1863 and 
in 19 07. Hillsborough county, first congressional, third coun- 
cilor and sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, nineteenth and 
twenty-second senatorial districts. Population, 70,063 (8 5,- 
000 in 1916 estimated). 

Nashua was granted in 1673 and named "Dunstable" or 
"Old Dunstable," and a charter was obtained from Massachu- 
setts. In 1739 part of "Dunstable" was set off and made into 
"West Parish of Dunstable," which later became Hollis. In 
1741 the boundary between New Hampshire and Massachu- 
setts was established, so that it divided "Dunstable" very 
nearly in the middle. In 1746 the New Hampshire part of 
"Dunstable" was incorporated. In 1763 part of the town, 
known as "One Pine Hill," was annexed to Hollis, and in 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 19 

1773 additional territory was annexed to the same town. In 
182 5 mills were built in "Dunstable," which made it an in- 
dustrial center, and in 1835 the Boston & Lowell railroad 
went into operation. The name was changed to Nashua in 
1836. Part of the town was set off in 1842 and incorporated 
into "Nashville," but in 1853 these two towns were reunited 
and made into the city of Nashua. Hillsborough county, sec- 
ond congressional, fourth councilor and twelfth and thirteenth 
senatorial districts. Population, 26,005. 

Portsmouth was settled in 1623 and is one of the oldest cit- 
ies in the country. In 1631 the "Council of Plymouth" 
granted the place as a township and named it "Pascataqua," 
which later was changed to "Strawberry Bank." In 16 58 the 
general court of Massachusetts incorporated it and changed 
the name to Portsmouth after an English city. In 1693 part 
of Portsmouth was set off and incorporated into Newcastle. 
In 1704 another part was set off and incorporated into Green- 
land, and in 1721 more territory was severed and annexed to 
Greenland. In 1726 part of Portsmouth, together with other 
territory, was incorporated into Rye. In 1821 part of New- 
ington was annexed to Portsmouth. Portsmouth became a 
city in 1849. In 1905 the envoys of Russia and Japan met 
in this city and signed the Treaty of Portsmouth, which 
brought an end to the Russian-Japanese war. This city has 
a navy yard, large breweries, and many industries. Its har- 
bor is one of the best on the coast, with a twelve-mile channel 
and big shipping facilities by rail and water. Rockingham 
county, first congressional, second councilor and twenty-fourth 
senatorial districts. Population, 11,269. 

Rochester was incorporated in 1722 and included what are 
now Farmington and Milton. The first settlements were made 
in 1728 by Captain Timothy Roberts and others, but Indian 
depredations prevented permanent settlement until about 1760. 
One of the first settlers in 1728 was Benjamin Richards, who 
soon left Rochester and settled what is now Atkinson. In 
179 8 the western part of the town was set off and incorporated 
into Farmington. In 1802 another part was set off and in- 
corporated into Milton. In 1846 part of Rochester was an- 
nexed to Barrington. It became a city in 1891. Rochester 
was the home of John P. Hale, who ran for president in 1852; 
Nathaniel Upham, who was a congressman in 1817; David 
Barker, who was a congressman in 1827; Dr. James Farring- 
ton, who was a congressman in 1837; and Jacob H. Ela, who 
served in congress from 1867 to 1884. Rochester is now 
called the "City of Governors," having furnished the state 
with the last two chief executives. Strafford county, first con- 



20 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

gressional, second councilor and twentieth senatorial districts. 
Population, 8,868. 

Somersworth was set off from Dover in 1729 and incor- 
porated as a parish. In 1754 it became a town. The first 
manufacturing company in the state was incorporated at Sal- 
mon Falls in 1761. Part of Somersworth was set off and in- 
corporated into Rollinsford in 1849. Somersworth became a 
city in 1893. Strafford county, first congressional, second 
councilor and twentieth senatorial districts. Population, 
6,704. 

THE TOWNS. 

Acworth was granted in 1752 to Colonel Sampson Stoddard 
of Chelmsford, Mass., incorporated in 1766, and was known as 
"Burnet." It was regranted in 1766 as "Ackworth" and again 
in 1772 as "Acworth." Three Connecticut men, Joseph Chat- 
terson, William Keyes and Samuel Smith settled the town in 
1767. Sullivan county, second congressional, fifth councilor 
and eighth senatorial districts. Population, 536. 

Albany was granted in 1766 to Clement March and others, 
and was known as "Burton." A boundary dispute between 
"Burton" and Tamworth was settled in 1796. "Burton" was 
severed from Grafton county in 1800 and annexed to Carroll 
county. In 1833 its name was changed to Albany. Part of 
Albany was annexed to Tamworth in 1857. First congres- 
sional, first councilor and fourth senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 289. 

Alexandria was granted in 1753 by the Masonian Proprie- 
tors to Joseph Butterfield, Jr., and others. The charter was 
renewed in 1767. The town was regranted in 1773 to Jonas 
Minot and others, and in 1782 it was incorporated. In 1773 
a large addition had been granted, which was incorporated as 
New London in 1779. In 1788 part of the town, together 
with a part of Hill (then known as New Chester), was incor- 
porated into Bridgewater, and in 1795 another part of Alex- 
andria was incorporated into Danbury. Part of Orange was 
annexed in 1820 and part of Alexandria was annexed to Hill 
the same year. Grafton county, second congressional, first 
councilor and fifth senatorial districts. Population, 571. 

Allenstown was granted in 1722 to the children of Governor 
Samuel Allen, for whom it was named, as "a tract of land 
four miles square adjoining Chester side line and Nottingham 
head line." It was settled in 1747 by Robert Buntin, John 
Wolcutt, Andrew Smith, Daniel Evans, John Perkins and 
others, and in 1759 part of the town was incorporated with 



K"EW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 21 

Pembroke. In 1815 a part of Bow was annexed and the 
town of Allenstown was incorporated in 1831. In 1853 part 
of Hooksett was annexed to Allenstown. Merrimack county, 
first congressional, fifth councilor and fourteenth senatorial 
districts. Population, 1,457. 

Alstead was granted in 1752 by Governor Benning Went- 
worth and named "New-town" or "Newton," but the grantees 
failed to comply with this charter and lost their title. In 1763 
the governor regranted it to Samuel Chase and seventy asso- 
ciates and the name was changed to Alstead and it was in- 
corporated. The next year the town was settled by Simon 
Baker, Isaac Cady and William Druse, and other early fam- 
ilies in town were those named Burroughs, Clark, Warner, 
Stephens, Chandler, Beckwick, Warde and Shepard. In 1772 
a charter was extended to it by Governor Wentworth, who held 
a reservation of five hundred acres in the northwest corner of 
the town. Cheshire county, second congressional, fourth coun- 
cilor and tenth senatorial districts. Population, 711. 

Alton was incorporated in 1796, as follows: "Easterly on 
New Durham, northerly on Wolfeborough, northwesterly on 
Winnipiseokee Pond, westerly on Gilmanton, and partly on 
Barnstead." It was formerly known as "New Durham Gore" 
and had been settled in 1770. In 1799 Barndoor Island was 
annexed to Alton. Parts of the town were annexed to Barn- 
stead in 1840 and to Wolfeborough in 1849. Belknap county, 
first congressional, second councilor and sixth senatorial dis- 
tricts. Population, 1,348. 

Amherst was granted in 172 8 by the Massachusetts colony 
as "Narragansett No. 3," and was incorporated as Amherst 
in 1760. Part of "Monson" was annexed in 1770. Part of 
its territory was severed from Amherst in 179 4 to go into the 
incorporation of Milford. Another part of the town was 
incorporated as Mont Vernon in 1803. The legislature met 
here in 179 4. Amherst sent two hundred and seventy-five 
men to the Revolutionary War and was represented in the 
"Boston Tea Party" in 1773 and the Battle of Lexington and 
Concord in 1775. Part of Milford was annexed to Amherst 
in 1842. Hillsborough county, second congressional, fourth 
councilor and twelfth senatorial districts. Population, 1,060. 

Andover was granted by the Masonian Proprietors in 1751 
to Edmund Brown and others and was named "New Breton" 
in honor of the captors of Cape Breton, some of whom were 
grantees. It was also called "Brown's town" and "Emery's 
town." In 1779 the town was incorporated and the name 
changed to Andover after an English town. The first settle- 



22 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

ment was in 1761 by Joseph Fellows. Andover is twenty- 
nine miles from Concord and contains five churches and two 
factories. Proctor academy, a Unitarian co-educational 
school, is at Andover center. Merrimack county, second con- 
gressional, fifth councilor and seventh senatorial districts. 
Population, 1,200. 

Antrim was settled in 1744 by Philip Riley, a Scotchman, 
and in 1767 by James Aiken. Ten years later the town was 
incorporated. In 1849 part of Antrim was annexed to Han- 
cock. Hillsborough county, second congressional, fourth 
councilor and ninth senatorial districts. Population, 1,235. 

Ashland was incorporated from a part of Holderness in 
1868. Grafton county, second congressional, first councilor 
and fifth senatorial districts. Population, 1,412. 

Atkinson was purchased from the Indians in 1642 and a 
deed was given by Passaquo and Saggahew, with the consent 
of their chief, Passaconnaway. It was settled in 1728 by 
Benjamin Richards of Rochester and three men from Haver- 
hill, Mass. It was incorporated in 1767 from a part of Plais- 
tow. Part of Atkinson was annexed to Hampstead in 1859. 
Rockingham county, first congressional, second councilor and 
twenty-third senatorial districts. Population, 440. 

Auburn was formerly a part of Chester and was known as 
the "West Parish" of that town. Its records begin in 1738, 
four years after the first minister, Reverend John Wilson, 
settled there. It was severed from Chester and incorporated 
as Auburn in 1845. Rockingham county, first congressional, 
third councilor and twenty-second senatorial district. Popu- 
lation, 637. 

Barnstead was granted in 1727 to Reverend Joseph Adams 
of Newington and others. Part of Alton was annexed in 1840. 
Belknap county, first congressional, second councilor and 
sixth senatorial districts. Population, 1,081. 

Harrington was granted in 1722 to "our loving subjects, the 
present proprietors of the iron works, lately set up at Lamprey 
river, viz., the Hon. John Wentworth, Esq., George Jaffrey, 
Esq., and Archibald Macphedris, Esq., and Robert Willson." 
An enabling act organizing the town was passed in 1742. 
Strafford county, first congressional, second councilor and 
twenty-first senatorial districts. Population, 9 00. 

Bartlett was incorporated in 179 0. Part of the town of 
Jackson (then "Adams") was annexed to it in 1819, and in 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 23 

1822 a tract of Bartlett was annexed to "Adams." State 
land was annexed to Bartlett in 1823 and 1836. Part of the 
town was annexed to Jackson in 1839. Part of Chatham was 
annexed to Bartlett in 1869 and a tract of Hart's Location in 
1878. Carroll county, first congressional, first councilor and 
fourth senatorial districts. Population, 1,197. 

Bath was laid out in 1760 and designated as "No. 10" on 
the Connecticut river. The following year it was granted to 
Andrew Gardner and sixty-one others. The first settlements 
were in 1765 by Gardner, Ebenezer Richardson and Benjamin 
Sawyer. During the two following years twenty-two more 
settlers, including John Sawyer, Jaasiel Harriman, Moses Pike 
and William Eastman, arrived. The original charter was 
forfeited and a new one granted in 1769. The town contained 
seventy families during the Revolution and furnished forty- 
six soldiers. In 1897 the northwestern part of Bath was an- 
nexed to Monroe. Grafton county, second congressional, first 
councilor and third senatorial districts. Population, 978. 

Bedford was one of the Massachusetts grants of 1733 and 
was known as "Narragansett No. 5" and later as "Souhegan 
East." It was settled in 1736, and among the early settlers 
were Matthew Patten, who was the first judge of probate after 
the Revolution; and Robert Walker and James Walker, cous- 
ins of General John Stark, who cleared the first land in town. 
"Souhegan East" was incorporated in 1750 as Bedford. Zach- 
ariah Chandler was born there in 1813 and moved to Michigan 
twenty years later, where he became one of the leading men 
of that state. Part of Bedford was annexed to Manchester in 
1853. Hillsborough county, first congressional, fourth coun- 
cilor and fourteenth senatorial districts. Population, 1,110. 

Belmont was a part of Gilmanton and in 1859 was incor- 
porated as "Upper Gilmanton." Ten years later the name 
was changed to Belmont. Belknap county, first congressional, 
second councilor and sixth senatorial districts. Population, 
1,390. 

Bennington was incorporated in 1842 and made up from 
parts of Deering, Francestown, Greenfield and Hancock. In 
1842 part of "Society Land" was annexed to it. Hillsborough 
county, second congressional, fourth councilor and eleventh 
senatorial districts. Population, 690. 

Benton was granted in 1764 to Theophilus Fitch and sixty- 
four others, of whom eleven bore the name of Weed, and was 
known as "Coventry." In 1840 the legislature changed the 
name to Benton. Grafton county, second congressional, first 
councilor and third senatorial districts. Population, 219. 



24 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Bethlehem was granted in 1774 and called "Lloyd Hills," 
and was incorporated in 1799, bounded by Franconia, Little- 
ton, Whitefield and Carroll. Additions were made to the town 
in 1848 and 1873. Grafton county, second congressional, first 
councilor and second senatorial districts. Population, 1,260. 

Boscawen was granted in 1733 by the Colony of Massachu- 
setts Bay and was known as "Contoocook." In 1760 it was 
incorporated as Boscawen for two years and in 1763 this char- 
ter was indefinitely continued. The first settlement was made 
the year of the grant. In 1791 an attempt was made to divide 
the town. Part of the town was set off and incorporated as 
Webster on the Fourth of July, 1860. Grafton county, second 
congressional, fifth councilor and seventh senatorial districts. 
Population, 1,240. 

Bow was granted in 1727. In 1759 a part of Bow, to- 
gether with "Suncook" and "Buckstreet," was incorporated 
as the "Parish of Pembroke." In 1765 part of Bow was set 
off and incorporated into Concord. In 1804 part of the town 
was annexed to Concord and part to Pembroke, and in 1815 
another part was annexed to Allenstown. In 1856 part of 
Bow was annexed to Concord. Merrimack county, second con- 
gressional, fifth councilor and fourteenth senatorial districts. 
Population, 676. 

Bradford was settled in 1771 by William Presbury of Hen- 
niker and originally of Stowe, Mass. Colonel Bradford granted 
him all the land he could encircle in a day's work on condition 
he would build a house and live in it. Three years later some 
people from Bradford, Mass., settled there and called the place 
"New Bradford." In 1787 "New Bradford," "Washington 
Gore" and a part of Washington were incorporated as the town 
of Bradford and annexed to Hillsborough county. Part of 
Newbury (then "Fishersfield") was annexed in 1796 and an- 
other part in 1859. In 1796 the first meeting house was built 
at "the Center" and it was used jointly for church and town 
purposes. Merrimack county, second congressional, fifth 
councilor and ninth senatorial districts. Population, 69 5. 

Brentwood was formerly a part of Exeter and was set off 
from that town in 1742 as "The Parish of Brintwood." Two 
years later the town was incorporated and an election was 
held. In 1764 the western part of Brentwood was cut off and 
made into a new town, known as "Poplin," which was later 
changed to Fremont. Rockingham county, first congressional, 
second councilor and twenty-third senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 759. 



NEW HAMPSHIKE MANUAL. 25 

Bridgewater was formerly a part of Hill ("New Chester") 
and was incorporated as a separate town in 1788. Jonathan 
Crawford was the first settler. In 1819 the southern part 
of Bridgewater and the northern part of "New Chester" were 
incorporated into a new town, which was called Bristol. Graf- 
ton county, second congressional, first councilor and fifth sena- 
torial districts. Population, 187. 

Bristol was incorporated in 1819 from portions of Bridge- 
water and Hill (then known as "New Chester"). Grafton 
county, second congressional, first councilor and fifth sena- 
torial districts. Population, 1,478. 

Brookfield was formerly a part of Middieton ("Kings- 
wood") and was incorporated in 1794. The first town meet- 
ing was held the next year at the house of Richard Hanson. 
Carroll county, first congressional, second councilor and fourth 
senatorial districts. Population, 247. 

Brookline was largely a part of the grant of the town of 
Dunstable in 16 37. It was incorporated as a separate town in 
1769 and called "Raby." Parts of Hollis were annexed in 
1786 and 1787. The name was changed to "Brooklyne" in 
1798 and has been since modernized to Brookline. Hills- 
borough county, second congressional, fourth councilor and 
twelfth senatorial districts. Population, 501. 

Campton was granted in 1761, settled in 176 5 and regranted 
in 1767. It was annexed to Grafton county in 1782. Part 
of the town was annexed to Plymouth in 1860. Plymouth and 
Campton were connected by telephone in 1881. Second con- 
gressional, first councilor and third senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 845. 

Canaan was granted to sixty- two men in 1761, settled in 
1766 and an extended grant received in 1769. The early 
settlers were John Schofleld and Thomas Miner. In 1846 
"Dame's Gore" was annexed and in 1851, on the Fourth of 
July, "Gates' Gore" was annexed. Grafton county, second 
congressional, first councilor and fifth senatorial districts. 
Population, 1,408. 

Candia was settled by William Turner in 1748 and by 
John Sargeant and others in 17 55. It was a part of Chester 
until 1763, when it was set off and incorporated. The line 
between Candia and Chester was established in 1848 after 
a long dispute. Rockingham county, first congressional, third 
councilor and twenty-second senatorial districts. Population, 
993. 



26 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Canterbury was granted and incorporated In 1727 and full 
town privileges were given it in 1741. The first settlements 
were between 1733 and 1750 by Daniel, Samuel and Simon 
Ames, brothers; Richard Blanchard, Jeremiah and Thomas 
Clough, William Curry, John Dolloff, John and William For- 
rest, Jr., John Glines, Ephraim Hackett, James Head, James 
Lindsay, Lieutenant William Miles and his son, Josiah; Ensign 
John Moore and three sons, and others. An additional grant 
to the town was made in 1765. In 1765 part of the town 
was set off and incorporated in 1773 into Loudon. In 1780 
another part was incorporated into Northfield. In 1784 part 
of Canterbury was annexed to Concord and another part to 
Loudon in 18 53. The population of the town at the first 
census in 179 was 1,038 and its largest population was 1,702 
in the year 1820. The Shaker society was organized in 1792, 
the fifth such society in the country. There are three 
churches: the Center Congregational, organized in 1761; the 
Free Baptist, in 1780; and the Hill's Corner church, in 1839. 
The seminary was founded in 1889 by the will of John Kezer. 
The Social library was incorporated in 1797. The Mutual 
Fire Insurance company was incorporated in 1849, one of the 
oldest. Canterbury was the home of Reverend Abiel Foster, 
pastor of the Center church, from 1761 to 1779; a continental 
congressman from 1783 to 1786, and a member of the first, 
fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh national congresses. Another 
resident, Dr. Joseph M. Harper, was congressman from 1831 
to 1835. Merrimack county, first congressional, fifth coun- 
cilor and seventh senatorial districts. Population, 680. 

Carroll was granted in 1772 and known as "Bretton-woods" 
and in 1832 it was incorporated as Carroll. Annexations to 
it were made in 1848 and 1878 from parts of "Nash and Saw- 
yer's Location," and in 1887 all of "Crawford's Grant" and the 
balance of "Nash and Sawyer's Location" were annexed. Coos 
county, second congressional, first councilor and second sena- 
torial districts. Population, 569. 

Center Harbor was set off from New Hampton in 1797. 
Part of Meredith was annexed to it in 1873. Belknap county, 
first congressional, fifth councilor and sixth senatorial dis- 
tricts. Population, 420. 

Charlestown was granted in 1735 as "No. 4" and regranted 
in 1753. Charlestown possesses historical importance as hav- 
ing been for many years the most advanced English settlement 
towards Canada, and the scene of repeated conflicts between 
English and French-Indian forces. A log fort built in 1744 
withstood several attacks, the last and fiercest being in 1747, 
when Captain Phineas Stevens with thirty men defended it sue- 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 27 

cessfully against some seven hundred French and Indians in 
a three days' battle. This fight definitely determined the Eng- 
lish supremacy in northern New England and ranks among the 
most important fights of the half century of conflict which 
delimited French influence in America. Parts of Charles- 
town and Walpole were erected into the town of Langdon in 
1787 when the legislature was in session in Charlestown. 
Part of Unity was annexed to it in 1810. Sullivan county, 
second congressional, fifth councilor and eighth senatorial dis- 
tricts. Population, 1,496. 

Chatham was granted in 1767 and settled in 1781. An 
additional grant was made in 1817. Chatham was annexed 
to Strafford county in 1823 and part of Conway was annexed 
to Chatham at the same time. In 1840 Chatham was included 
in the new county of Carroll and in 1869 part of the town was 
annexed to Bartlett. First congressional, first councilor and 
fourth senatorial districts. Population, 209. 

Chester was granted in 1720 as "Cheshire" and two years 
later was incorporated as Chester. In 1763 part of the town 
was incorporated into Candia and another part into Raymond 
the next year. In 1822 part of Chester, with parts of Dun- 
barton and Goffstown, were incorporated into Hooksett. In 
1845 still another portion was incorporated as Auburn. In 
1848 the line between Chester and Candia was established 
after a long dispute. Rockingham county, first congressional, 
third councilor and twenty-second senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 818. 

Chesterfield was granted in 1752 as "No. 1" and regranted 
as Chesterfield in 1760. It was settled the following year. 
Cheshire county, second congressional, fourth councilor and 
tenth senatorial districts. Population, 770. 

Chichester was granted in 172 7 by Lieutenant Governor 
John Wentworth to Nathaniel Gookin and others, including 
most of the state officers. It was eight miles square. The 
northern part was set off and incorporated as Pittsfield in 
1782. Merrimack county, first congressional, fifth councilor 
and fourteenth senatorial districts. Population, 606. 

Claremont, the largest town in the state, was granted in 
1764 to Josiah Willard of Winchester and sixty-eight others. 
Shares were reserved for Governor Benning Wentworth, the 
Church of England, the first minister, each school and the pro- 
pagation of the gospel, and all the white pine trees were re- 
served for the King's Navy. Three of the grantees settled 
there, Samuel Ashley and his two sons, Samuel Ashley, Jr., 
and Oliver Ashley. Doctor William Sumner and his brother, 



28 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Benjamin Sumner, who were respectively the father and uncle 
of Clement Sumner, another grantee, were among the first 
settlers. The first meeting of the proprietors was held in 
Winchester in 1767 and the second in Claremont later the 
same year. A tract of five hundred acres was laid out as 
"the governor's farm," and forty acres were given to William 
Porter for doing settlement duty. On their arrival in Clare- 
mont the proprietors found two "squatters," Moses Spofford 
and David Lynde, who are said to have settled as early as 
1762; and in 1763 was born in a log cabin Elijah Spofford, 
the first white child in town. In 1767 Benjamin Tyler came 
from Connecticut and built a mill on the Sugar river. Later 
he brought ore from Charlestown and started a forge and 
smelting works, and later still built a flax mill. In 1813 
Asa Meacham built the first woolen mill in that section. In 
1810 the first Merino sheep ever imported into this country 
were brought by William Jarvis, consul to Spain, and intro- 
duced into Claremont by his kinsman, Dr. Leonard Jarvis. 
Part of Unity was annexed in 1828. Sullivan county, second 
congressional, fifth councilor and eighth senatorial districts. 
Population, 7,529. 

Clarksville was settled in 1832 by Benjamin Clark and was 
known as "Dartmouth College Grant" until 1853, when the 
place was incorporated as Clarksville. The privilege of col- 
lecting the town taxes was sold to John Roby in 1832 for 
twelve and one half cents. Coos county, second congressional, 
first councilor and second senatorial districts. Population, 
271. 

Colebrook was granted in 1762 as "Dryden" and regranted 
in 1770 under the name of "Colebrooke Towne" and in- 
corporated as Colebrook in 1796. The Upper Coos railroad 
to Colebrook was opened in 1887. Coos county, second con- 
gressional, first councilor and second senatorial districts. Pop- 
ulation, 1,9 05. 

Columbia was granted in 1762 as "Preston" and regranted 
in 1770 under the name of "Cockburne Towne," and three 
years later a grant of about six thousand acres, including 
this place, was made to Seth Wales and seventeen others. 
In 179 7 the place was incorporated as "Cockburne" and in 
1804 "Wales' Location" was annexed to it. The name was 
changed to Columbia in 1811. Coos county, second congres- 
sional, first councilor and second senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 619. 

Conway was granted and incorporated in 1765 in two sec- 
tions, the first of twenty-three thousand and forty acres and 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 29 

the second of two thousand additional acres. Daniel Foster 
and others were the grantees. James Osgood, Benjamin Os- 
good, John Doloff and Ebenezer Burbank settled the place in 
1764. The town was regranted in 1772 and in 1778 was 
annexed to Strafford county. In 1823 part of the town was 
annexed to Chatham. Conway was put into Carroll county in 
1840. First congressional, first councilor and fourth sena- 
torial districts. Population, 3,413. 

Cornish was granted in 176 3 to Reverend Saumel McClin- 
tock and sixty-nine others and named Cornish. The first 
settlements were made two years later by Samuel Chase and 
his two sons, Samuel and Dudley Chase; Daniel Putnam, Dyer 
Spaulding and others. In 176 7 a town meeting was held. 
In 1778 it was one of the towns that voted to unite with 
Vermont. In 1808 the boundary between Cornish and Grant- 
ham was established. The next year part of Croydon was an- 
nexed and in 1844 part of Grantham was annexed. Cornish 
was the national summer capitol during the first part of the 
presidency of Woodrow Wilson. It has a large colony of writ- 
ers and artists. Sullivan county, second congressional, fifth 
councilor and eighth senatorial districts. Population, 1,005. 

Croydon was granted in 1763 by Governor Benning Went- 
worth to Samuel Chase and sixty-four others. It contained 
23,040 acres, with the customary reservations for church and 
state. The first settlement was in 1766 by Moses Whipple, 
Seth Chase, David Warren, Ezekiel Powers and others, mostly 
from Grafton, Mass. The town was rechartered in 1768, and 
when the Revolution broke out there were one hundred and 
forty-three inhabitants. The town furnished fifty-five soldiers 
for the Revolutionary army and twelve more for the War of 
1812. In 1808 the northern part of the town was annexed to 
Grantham, and in 1809 another tract was annexed to Cornish. 
In 1820 there were 1,060 inhabitants. The town celebrated 
its one hundred fiftieth anniversary August 24, 1916. Sul- 
livan county, second congressional, fifth councilor and eighth 
senatorial districts. Ppoulation, 324. 

Dalton was granted in 1764 to James Avery and others as 
part of "Cheswick." Six years later it was regranted as "Ap- 
thorp" in honor of George Apthorp of England, one of the 
grantees, and in 1773 there were fourteen inhabitants. In 
1784, when New Hampshire became a state, the place was 
divided into two towns, the northern part becoming Dalton and 
the southern Littleton. Coos county, second congressional, 
first councilor and second senatorial districts. Population, 
475. 



30 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Danbury was made from a part of Alexandria and incor- 
porated in 1795. In 1808 the boundaries were established 
between Danbury and Hill ("New Chester") and Alexandria. 
In 1848 part of Wilmot was annexed and in 1858 part of Hill. 
Danbury was annexed to Merrimack county in 1874. Another 
part of Wilmot was annexed to Danbury in 1878. Merrimack 
county, second congressional, fifth councilor and seventh sena- 
torial districts. Population, 592. 

Danville was settled by Jonathan Sanborn in 1738 and was 
a part of Kingston until 1760, when it was incorporated as 
"Hawke." Part of Fremont ("Poplin") was annexed in 1783. 
In 1836 the name was changed to Danville and in 1877 a small 
part of Hampstead was annexed. Rockingham county, first 
congressional, second councilor and twenty-third senatorial 
districts. Population, 517. 

Deerfield was included in the grant of Nottingham in 1722 
to about two hundred men from Boston and vicinity by the 
governor of Massachusetts in payment for "services rendered 
and grievances endured." A petition to the governor by these 
men the previous year asked for a township to be named 
"New Boston," but the name actually given to it was Notting- 
ham. In 1750 a small settlement was made in the western 
part of Nottingham and this settlement was set off as a sep- 
arate parish. In 1756 this parish petitioned to be incor- 
porated, and while Governor Wentworth was considering this 
petition, a Mr. Batchelder killed a very large, fat deer in the 
settlement and gave it to the governor, which so pleased His 
Excellency tnat he named the town Deerfield. It was incor- 
porated in 1766. In 1762 four men, "with axe and gun," went 
into the wild, unsettled part of northern Nottingham and made 
clearings, one going as far as the "Narrows." "When this 
settlement had three hundred inhabitants, in 1773, it was 
chartered as Northwood. Rockingham county, first congres- 
sional, second councilor and twenty-second senatorial districts. 
Population, 917. 

Deering was chartered by Governor John Wentworth in 1774 
in honor of Lady Wentworth, whose maiden name was Frances 
Deering. It had been settled in 1765 by Alexander Robin- 
son, William McKean and others, and was known first as 
"Cumberland" and then as "Society Land." In 1842 the 
southwestern part of the town, together with parts of Green- 
field, Francestown and Hancock, formed the town of Benning- 
ton. Hillsborough county, second congressional, fourth coun- 
cilor and ninth senatorial districts. Population, 353. 

Derry was a part of Londonderry ("Nuffield") until its 
incorporation in 1827. The special telegraph line to Chester 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 31 

was laid in 18 77 and in 1892 telephone connection was estab- 
lished with Manchester. It is a shoe-manufacturing center. 
Rockingham county, first congressional, third councilor and 
twenty-second senatorial districts. Population, 7,000 (esti- 
mated). 

Dorchester was granted in 1761, 1766 and 1772. A spe- 
cial highway tax of two pence per acre was levied in 1791 
and a similar tax of three cents per acre in 1801. Grafton 
county, second congressional, first councilor and fifth sena- 
torial districts. Population, 241. 

Dublin was granted in 1749 to Matthew Thornton and thirty- 
nine others and was known as "Monadnock No. 3." The first 
settlement was made about 1752 by William Thornton. The 
town was incorporated in 1771. Part of it was annexed to 
Marlborough in 1818. In 1870 parts of Dublin and Nelson 
were incorporated into Harrisville. Cheshire county, second 
congressional, fourth councilor and eleventh senatorial dis- 
tricts. Population, 571. 

Dummer was granted in 1773 and incorporated in 1848, 
after petitions for and remonstrances against had been pre- 
sented to the legislature. Part of Stark was annexed to it in 
1868. Coos county, second congressional, first councilor and 
first senatorial districts. Population, 292. 

Dumbarton was granted in 1735 by Massachusetts to Capt. 
John Gorham's men and regranted by the Masonian Proprie- 
tors in 1748 and 1752 to Archibald Stark, father of Gen- 
eral John Stark, and was known as "Starktown" until its 
incorporation as Dunbarton in 1765. The first settlement 
was made by James Rogers and Joseph Putney some years 
prior to 1746. They built log houses at "Great Meadow" 
and during subsequent years were raided by Indians. Major 
Caleb Stark opened the first store in town, and his customers 
came from the Connecticut river and places more than fifty 
miles distant. In 1822 part of the town was incorporated 
into Hooksett. The boundary between Dunbarton and Goffs- 
town was established in 1853. Merrimack county, second con- 
gressional, fifth councilor and fourteenth senatorial districts. 
Population, 513. 

Durham was originally a part of Dover and was known as 
"Oyster River" from its settlement before 1640 until its in- 
corporation as Durham in 1732. It was a frontier town, which 
suffered severely from Indian attacks. The western part of 
the town was set off and incorporated as Lee in 1766. The 
boundary on the south side was established in 1818. Part of 
Durham was annexed to Newmarket in 1870. The state col- 



32 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

lege has its home here. Strafford county, first congressional, 
second councilor and twenty-first senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 823. 

East Kingston was set off from Kingston and incorporated 
in 1738. The line was established between the two towns in 
1740 and re-established in 179 8. Part of East Kingston was 
annexed to South Hampton in 1824 and another part was an- 
nexed to Newton in 1845. Rockingham county, first con- 
gressional, second councilor and twenty-third senatorial dis- 
tricts. Population, 413. 

Easton was originally part of Lincoln, then of Landaff, and 
in 1876 a valley six miles long was set off from Landaff and 
incorporated. Grafton county, second congressional, first 
councilor and third senatorial districts. Population, 226. 

Eaton was granted in 1760 to Clement March and sixty-five 
associates; and in 1795 five tracts of land, each of two thou- 
sand acres, were annexed. The boundary between Tamworth 
and Eaton was established in 1796 and revised in 1808. In 
1852 the western part of Eaton was set off and incorporated 
as Madison. Carroll county, first congressional, first coun- 
cilor and fourth senatorial districts. Population, 380. 

Effingham was granted in 1749 in two sections and the char- 
ter renewed in 1766, and it was known as "Leavitt's Town" 
until its incorporation in 1778. "Wakefield Gore" was an- 
nexed in 1820, and in that same year part of "Ossipee Gore" 
was annexed. In 1831 the northern part of Effingham was set 
off and incorporated as "North Effingham," which later became 
Freedom. Carroll county, first congressional, first councilor 
and fourth senatorial districts. Population, 558. 

Ellsworth was known as "Trecothick" from the time it was 
granted in 1769 until its incorporation in 1802. The town 
was settled in 179 by Jonathan T. Downing of Gilmanton. 
Grafton county, second congressional, first councilor and fifth 
senatorial districts. Population, 53. 

Enfield was granted in 1761 and regranted in 1768 as "Rel- 
han." The grant was repealed in 1784. In 1781 a com- 
mittee was authorized to establish the lines of the town of 
"Enfield, alias Relhan." The committee's report was adopted 
in 1802. In 1837 part of Grantham was annexed. Grafton 
county, second congressional, first councilor and fifth sena- 
torial districts. Population, 1,448. 

Epping was part of Exeter until its incorporation in 1741. 
The boundary between Epping and Lee was established in 
1818. One of its residents, William Plumer, was four times 




EXECVTIVE'QOVNCIL 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 33 

elected governor between 1812 and 1818. Epping is a brick- 
maufacturing center. Rockingham county, first congressional, 
second councilor and twenty-third senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 1,649. 

Epsom was granted in 1727 to Theodore Atkinson and 
others. The first meeting of the grantees was held that year 
in the ferry house at Newcastle, and the first meeting held 
in Epsom was in 1743. In 1841 a Pittsfield school district 
and Epsom school district No. 6 were united to form "Repub- 
lican School district." Merrimack county, first congressional, 
fifth councilor and fourteenth senatorial districts. Popula- 
tion, 725. 

Errol was granted in 1774 to people residing in Salem, 
Mass., and Danvers, Mass. There were few settlers prior to 
18 00 and only twenty-six inhabitants in 182 0. The town was 
incorporated in 1836 and the population in 18 80 was 161. It 
is well known for its fishing and hunting. Coos county, sec- 
ond congressional, first councilor and first senatorial districts. 
Population, 211. 

Exeter was settled in 1638 by Rev. John Wheelwright, who 
received a grant of one hundred and thirty miles north and 
northwest from the Merrimack river, with the exception of 
Dover and Portsmouth. This territory had been previously 
known as "Squamscott Falls," and Reverend Wheelwright 
gave the name of Exeter to this and all surrounding country 
when he settled with some twenty or thirty other men. The 
town became established in 16 39 and maintained a system 
of self-government. Land which now includes the town of 
Hampton was purchased that same year by Exeter people from 
the Indians. In 1641 Exeter went under the jurisdiction of 
Massachusetts and became a part of Norfolk county of Massa- 
chusetts Bay colony. Reverend Wheelwright's son, grandson 
and great grandson were chosen councilors. About 16 56 the 
Massachusetts legislature cut down the territory of Exeter to 
about one half its original dimensions. At the same time one 
Thomas Wiggin gave some land on the southern end, one 
mile wide and three miles long, to the town. Newmarket was 
set off from Exeter and incorporated in 172 7, Brentwood in 
1742 and Epping in 1741, so that the town contained less 
than seventeen square miles, or one twentieth of the original 
grant or purchase of Wheelwright from the Indians. This is 
the home of Phillips Exeter academy, the oldest academy in 
the state. Exeter was the state capital during the Revolution 
and all sessions of the provincial congress or convention and 
colonial legislature were held here. The state legislature met 
here frequently until about 1800. Rockingham county, first 



34 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

congressional, second councilor and twenty-third senatorial 
districts. Population, 4,897. 

Farmington was incorporated out of Rochester in 1798. 
Fourteen years later Henry Wilson, who became vice-presi- 
dent, was born here. It was known previously as "Farming- 
ton Dock." Strafford county, first congressional, second 
councilor and twentieth senatorial districts. Population, 
2,621. 

Fitzwilliam was granted in 1752 as "Monadnock No. 4," and 
was incorporated in 1773 as Fitzwilliam. In 1815 four thou- 
sand acres in the northern part of the town were set off and 
incorporated as Troy. The boundary between Fitzwilliam and 
Rindge was established in 1847. Cheshire county, second 
congressional, fourth councilor and eleventh senatorial dis- 
tricts. Population, 1,148. 

Francestown was granted by the Masonian Proprietors in 
1752 and incorporated in 1772 from "New Boston Addition" 
and a portion of "Society Land." In 1792 part of Greenfield, 
then known as "Lyndeborough Addition," was annexed, and 
in 1802 another portion of "Society Land." In 1842 part of 
the town, together with parts of Deering, Greenfield and Han- 
cock, was incorporated as Bennington. In 1872 part of Green- 
field was annexed. Hillsborough county, second congressional, 
fourth councilor and ninth senatorial districts. Population, 
602. 

Franconia was granted in 1764 and regranted in 1772. It 
was known as "Morristown" from the latter date until 1782, 
when it was changed back to Franconia. The famous natural 
curiosity, "The Old Man of the Mountain," is in Franconia. 
Grafton county, second congressional, first councilor and sec- 
ond senatorial districts. Population, 504. 

Freedom was formerly the northern part of "Leavitt's 
Town," which became Effingham in 1778. Freedom was in- 
corporated as "North Effingham" in 1831 and put into Straf- 
ford county. The following year the name was changed to 
Freedom, and in 1840 it was put into the new county of Car- 
roll. First congressional, first councilor and fourth senatorial 
districts. Population, 542. 

Fremont was a part of Brentwood until its incorporation in 
1764 as "Poplin." The southern part of "Poplin" was author- 
ized by the legislature of 1783 to join Danville, which was 
then known as "Hawke." The name of "Poplin" was changed 
to Fremont in 1854. Rockingham county, first congressional, 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 35 

second councilor and twenty-third senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 622. 

Gilford was originally a part of Gilmanton when that town 
was formed in 1727 out of "Gunstock Parish." It was settled 
in 1781 by James Ames and Captain Samuel F. Gilman. In 
1812 the legislature, on petition of Moses Rowell and one hun- 
dred forty-eight others, set "Gunstock Parish" off and incor- 
porated it into Gilford, a name bestowed upon it by Captain 
Lemuel B. Mason, a soldier in the Revolution, who fought at 
the Battle of Gilford Court House in South Carolina, where 
he derived the name. Six islands in Winnipesaukee lake were 
annexed in 1826. Part of Gilmanton was annexed in 1851. 
Part of Gilford was annexed to Laconia in 1874 and part of 
Laconia to Gilford in 1876. Belknap county, first congres- 
sional, second councilor and sixth senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 744, 

Gilmanton was granted in 1727 by Governor John Went- 
worth. It was settled in 1761 by Benjamin Mudgett. It was 
set off from Rockingham county in 1771 and became a part of 
Strafford county. "Governor's Island" was annexed in 179 9. 
"Gunstock Parish" was set off and incorporated as Gilford in 
1812. Gilmanton ranked as the second town in the state in 
1827, Londonderry being first. Gilmanton was embraced in 
the new county of Belknap in 1840. In 1851 part of the town 
was annexed to Gilford. In 1859 part of the town was set off 
and incorporated as "Upper Gilmanton," which later became 
Belmont. First congressional, second councilor and sixth 
senatorial districts. Population, 968. 

Gilsum was granted in 1752 to Joseph Osgood and seventy 
others as "Boyle." A regrant was made in 1763 to Samuel 
Gilbert and Thomas Sumner, who settled the place and took 
the first syllables of their names to form the word Gil-sum. 
Part of Gilsum was combined with part of Westmoreland in 
1769 to form the town of Surry. In 1787 part of Gilsum, 
with other territory, was incorporated into Sullivan. Part of 
Sullivan was annexed to it in 1874. Cheshire county, second 
congressional, fourth councilor and tenth senatorial districts. 
Population, 470. 

Goffstown was granted by Massachusetts in 1733 and known 

as Narragansett No. 4. It was regranted by the Masonian 
Proprietors in 1748 to Rev. Thomas Parker of Dracut, Mass., 
and others, and was sometimes called "Shove's-town." It 
was incorporated in 1761 and named after Col. John Goffe. 
The charter was renewed in 1763. Part of the town, together 
with parts of Dunbarton and Chester, went into the incorpora- 
tion of Hooksett in 1822. Some islands in the Merrimack 



36 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

river were annexed in 1825. Part of New Boston was an- 
nexed in 1836. In 1853 the boundary between Dunbarton 
and Goffstown was established and part of Goffstown was an- 
nexed to Manchester. Hillsborough county, first congres- 
sional, fourth councilor and fourteenth senatorial districts. 
Population, 2,579. 

Gorham was granted in 1770 to Mark Hunking Wentworth 
and others and was called "Shelburne Addition." The first 
settlements were in 1803 by Bezaleel Bennett, who came from 
Conway (at that time called "Pigwacket") and remained but 
a short time. Stephen Messer of Andover, Mass., came in 
1805 and was the first permanent settler. The Jackson and 
Goodnow families came two years later, and Joseph Jackson 
purchased the present site of Gorham Village. The first school 
was opened in 1832 and the teacher, Miss Salome Mason of 
"Gilead," received a salary of $1 a week. In 1836 the town 
was incorporated and the name changed to Gorham. The At- 
lantic and Saint Lawrence railroad was built to Gorham in 
1850 and began running trains the next year. This town is 
eight hundred twelve feet above sea level and is the nearest 
village to Mount Washington. There are twelve mountain 
peaks of an average height of more than five thousand feet, 
whose bases are within an eight-mile radius. It is a rendez- 
vous of mountain climbers. In 19 02 an electric railroad 
from Gorham to Berlin was built. Coos county, second con- 
gressional, first councilor and first senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 2,200. 

Goshen was erected out of parts of Newbury, Sunapee, 
Newport, Unity and Lempster and incorporated in 1791. The 
earliest settlement had been made in 1769. Part of Unity was 
annexed in 1837. Sullivan county, second congressional, fifth 
councilor and eighth senatorial districts. Population, 329. 

Grafton was granted in 1761 and the grant was surrendered 
the following year. In 1769 a regrant was made and in 1772 
Captain Joseph Hoyt of Fremont made the first settlement. 
The town was incorporated in 1778. Grafton county, second 
congressional, first councilor and fifth senatorial districts. 
Population, 641. 

Grantham was granted in 1761 and regranted as New 
Grantham in 1767. The westerly part of this town and the 
easterly part of Plainfield were made the parish of Meriden 
in 1780. In 1788 the town was incorporated as New Grant- 
ham, and in 1818 was incorporated as Grantham. A tract of 
land was severed from Grantham and annexed to Enfield in 
1837 and a part was annexed to Cornish in 1844. In 1856 
a portion of the town was annexed to Plainfield and in 1858 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 37 

a part of the gore between Grantham and Springfield was an- 
nexed to the town of Grantham. Sullivan county, second con- 
gressional, fifth councilor and eighth senatorial districts. 
Population, 286. 

Greenfield was incorporated in 1791 from parts of Peter- 
borough, Lyndeborough, "Society Land" and "Lyndeborough 
Gore." The first town meeting was called in that year by 
Daniel Emerson of Hollis. Later in the year the boundaries 
were established, and in 1792 the two eastern ranges of lots 
of land, which had been known previous to incorporation as 
"Lyndeborough Addition," were annexed to Francestown. 
The first settlements in Greenfield were in 1771 by Captain 
Alexander Parker, Major A. Whittemore, Simeon Fletcher and 
others, mostly English and Scotch-Irish, coming from London- 
derry, Andover, Mass., Chelmsford, Mass., and Marblehead, 
Mass. In 1842 part of Greenfield, together with parts of Deer- 
ing, Francestown and Hancock, was incorporated into Ben- 
nington. In 1872 part of Greenfield was annexed to Frances- 
town. Hillsborough county, second congressional, fourth 
councilor and twelfth senatorial districts. Population, 574. 

Greenland was set off from Portsmouth and established in 
1704. In 1721 more of Portsmouth was annexed. Part of 
Stratham was annexed in 1805 and another part in 1847. The 
boundaries were fully established in 1859 and 1860. Rock- 
ingham county, first congressional, second councilor and 
twenty-fourth senatorial districts. Population, 575. 

Greenville was incorporated in 1872 from a part of Mason 
and the boundaries were established the following year. Part 
of Greenville was included in the first grant of New Ipswich 
in 1735 and was settled in 1752. Hillsborough county, second 
congressional, fourth councilor and twelfth senatorial districts, 
Population, 1,374. 

Groton was granted in 1761 as "Cockermouth," and re- 
granted in 1766. It was settled in 1770. Part of the town 
was erected, together with part of Plymouth, into the town of 
Hebron in 1792. In 1796 the name of "Cockermouth" was 
changed to Groton, and in 1845 part of Hebron was annexed 
to it. Grafton county, second congressional, first councilor 
and fifth senatorial districts. Population, 319. 

Hampstead was formerly part of Amesbury, Mass., and 
Haverhill, Mass., and was known as "Timberlane," and was 
settled in 1728. It was incorporated as Hampstead in 1749. 
Part of Atkinson was annexed to it in 1859. In 1877 part of 
Hampstead was annexed to Danville. Rockingham county, 
first congressional, second councilor and twenty-third sena- 
torial districts. Population, 796. 



38 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Hampton was granted by the Massachusetts Colony in 1635 
to Rev. Stephen Bachiler and others. It was purchased from 
the Indians by Exeter people that same year. The original 
name was "Winnacunnet," which means in Indian, "The Beau- 
tiful Place of the Pines." The name Hampton was given at 
the request of the grantees in 1639. The first settlers in 
1638 were Stephen Bachiler, Christopher Hussey, Mary Hussey, 
Thomas Cromwell, Samuel Skullard, John Osgood, John Cross, 
Samuel Greenfield, John Molton, Thomas Molton, William Es- 
tow, William Palmer, William Sargeant, Richard Swayne, Wil- 
liam Sanders, Robert Tucke, with divers others. The town 
was incorporated in 1639; in 1694 part of the town went to 
make up Kingston, including East Kingston, Danville and part 
of Sandown; in 1718 part was set off to make Hampton Falls, 
including Kensington and part of Seabrook; in 1738 that part 
of Hampton known as "North Hill Parish" was set off and four 
years later incorporated as North Hampton. Hampton is on 
the seacoast and has one of the finest beaches in New England. 
Its area is eight thousand acres. Rockingham county, first 
congressional, second councilor and twenty-third senatorial 
districts. Population, 1,215. 

Hampton Falls was formerly part of Hampton and in 1685 
there were two hundred twelve inhabitants in it. The town 
was set off from Hampton in 1718 and incorporated in 1726. 
The western part was set off and incorporated as Kensington 
in 1737 and the southern part as Seabrook in 1768. Part of 
Hampton Falls was annexed to Seabrook in 1816. Rocking- 
ham county, first congressional, second councilor and twenty- 
third senatorial districts. Population, 552. 

Hancock was settled in 1765 by John Grimes and was in- 
corporated in 1779. Part of "Society Land" was annexed in 
1794 and part of Antrim in 1849. In 1842 part of the town, 
together with parts of Deering, Greenfield and Francestown, 
was incorporated into Bennington. Hillsborough county, sec- 
ond congressional, fourth councilor and eleventh senatorial 
districts. Population, 642. 

Hanover was granted in 1761 to Edmund Freeman, Jr., and 
settled in 1765 by Col. Edmund Freeman of Mansfield, Conn. 
Twenty families were living there in log houses when Dart- 
mouth college was chartered and given a grant of part of the 
town in 1769. Additional grants were given of five hundred 
acres in 1771 and two thousand in 1775. The legislature met 
here in 179 5. Grafton county, second congressional, first 
councilor and fifth senatorial districts. Population, 2,075. 

Harrisville was incorporated in 1870 from parts of Dublin 
and Nelson. It was settled in 1762 by Thomas Packer of 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 39 

Portsmouth. Cheshire county, second congressional, fourth 
councilor and eleventh senatorial districts. Population, 623. 

Hart's Location was granted in 1772 to Thomas Chadbourne 
and included the long valley of the Saco river, from Jackson 
to the "White Mountain Notch." The "Willey House" was 
built in 1792, and in 1826 the "Willey House Slide" occurred. 
A gore of land between Hart's Location and Bartlett was an- 
nexed in 1861. A small part of the Location was annexed to 
Bartlett in 1878. Carroll county, first congressional, first 
councilor and fourth senatorial districts. Population, 85. 

Haverhill was originally a favorite Indian resort known as 
"Lower Coos." It was granted in 1763 to John Hazzen and 
seventy-four other residents of Haverhill, Mass., and the name 
was changed on that account. Hazzen had begun a settlement 
two years previous on a promise of a charter. Other promi- 
nent early settlers were John Hurd, John Page, Asa Porter, 
Ezekiel Ladd, James Woodward and Charles Johnston. Since 
1773 the town has been the seat of Grafton county and the 
principal village in town, known as Woodsville, contains the 
court house, almshouse and house of correction. Haverhill 
was divided into two parishes in 1815. Second congressional, 
first councilor and third senatorial districts. Population, 
3,498. 

Hebron was incorporated in 1792 from parts of "Cocker- 
mouth" and Plymouth. The line between Hebron and Orange 
was established in 1804 and again in 1808. A part of Hebron 
was annexed to Plymouth in 1845 and another piece to Groton 
the same year. Grafton county, second congressional, first 
councilor and fifth senatorial districts. Population, 213, 

Henniker was granted in 1735 to John Whitman and others 
who resided in Stowe and Marlborough, two Massachusetts 
towns. In 1752 it was regranted to William Todd and others 
and sometimes called "Todd's-town." No settlements were 
made and no name given to the place until 1760, when a 
number of people came there to live from Marlborough and 
called it "New Marlborough." Reverend James Scales and 
James Peters were the first settlers. Three years later, 1763, 
Eliakim Howe, Amos Gould and Thomas Stone moved there 
from Marlborough, Jonas Bowman moved from Lexington, 
Mass.; William Peters, son of the first settler, moved from 
Hopkinton, and Josiah Ward and family moved from Marl- 
borough. Mrs. Ward was the first white woman who ever 
came into town over "Craney Hill." Her husband cut a 
large maple tree to build a log cabin with and she per- 
suaded him to leave a considerable stump, which he did, 
and for years this stump was their only table. Mr. Ward 



40 NEW HAMPSHIKE MANUAL. 

became a butter-maker and carried his product to Amherst 
and Nashua ("Dunstable") over a road that has been ever 
since known as "Butter Road." In 1764 Deacon Ebenezer 
Hathorn and several families came, and in 1766 many families 
from Marlborough, Stowe, Danville and Pembroke. In 1768 
there were thirty-one families living there, and they got the 
town incorporated and wanted to name it "New Marlborough," 
but Governor Wentworth insisted that it be named Henniker 
in honor of his friend, John Henniker of London, England, a 
wealthy merchant. The regrant of the town in 1752 made 
it six miles square, and no territory has ever been annexed 
to it or severed from it. Merrimack county, second congres- 
sional, fifth councilor and ninth senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 1,395. 

Hill was granted in 1753 to Matthew Thornton and his asso- 
ciates. In 1768 it was settled by Carr Huse and Captain Cut- 
ting Favour. In 1778 the town was incorporated and named 
"New Chester." In 1788 the northern part of the town was 
incorporated into Bridgewater. In 1808 the boundary be- 
tween "New Chester" and Danbury was established. In 1819 
that part of "New Chester" north of Smith river, together with 
part of Bridgewater, was incorporated into a new town, which 
became Bristol later. In 1820 part of Alexandria was an- 
nexed to "New Chester," and in 1832 part of "New Chester" 
was annexed to Wilmot. In 1837 "New Chester" changed 
its name to Hill. In 1858 part of Hill was annexed to Dan- 
bury. In 1868 the town was changed from Grafton county 
to Merrimack county. Second congressional, fifth councilor 
and seventh senatorial districts. Population, 556. 

Hillsborough was granted in 1735 and regranted in 1748 
to John Hill and others, and incorporated in 1772. It is the 
birthplace of Franklin Pierce, who became President. Hills- 
borough county, second congressional, fourth councilor and 
ninth senatorial districts. Population, 2,168. 

Hinsdale was granted in 1687 by Chief Nawellet of the 
Squakheag Indians to the proprietors of the town of North- 
field, Mass. This town and Vernon, Vt, continued to be em- 
braced in the Northfield township until 1741, when the Mas- 
sachusetts-New Hampshire boundary was established, and a 
tract of land four miles long and one hundred ninety-seven 
rods wide was cut off from Northfield and put into New Hamp- 
shire and named "Fort Dummer." Hinsdale was a part of 
the grant of Winchester in 1733 by Massachusetts. The 
charter of the town was issued in 17 53, when New Hamp- 
shire regranted it to Ebenezer Alexander and his associates, 
and included territory between the east boundary of Winches- 



MW HAMPSHIKE MANUAL. 41 

ter and the Connecticut river. The first settlement was in 1737 
by Daniel Shattuck, and other early settlers were Peter Evans, 
Robert Cooper, John Evans and Colonel Ebenezer Hinsdale. 
The colonel was the son of a Deerfield woman, who was carried 
captive to Canada by the Indians. He later became chaplain 
of Fort Dummer, and himself built Fort Hinsdale in 1742. 
In the same year of the incorporation the colonel and others 
petitioned for a division of the town, which was granted; and 
the western part was renamed Hinsdale after the leading peti- 
tioner. For several years Hinsdale embraced territory on 
both sides of the river, including Vernon. Horrible warfare 
with Indians was carried on by the settlers. Forts Hinsdale, 
Dummer and Shattuck were defensive points. A resident of 
this town, William Haile, was the first governor elected by the 
Republican party (1857). Cheshire county, second congres- 
sional, fourth councilor and eleventh senatorial districts. 
Population, 1,673. 

Holderness was granted in 1751 to John Shepard and oth- 
ers and regranted in 1761 to Major John Wentworth and 
others. It was originally called "New Holderness" in honor 
of the Earl of Holderness. In 1782 the town was changed 
from Strafford to Grafton county. In 1816 the name was 
changed to Holderness. The southern part of the town was 
cut off in 186 8 and incorporated into Ashland. Second con- 
gressional, first councilor and third senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 652. 

Hollis was originally part of "Dunstable," which was granted 
by Massachusetts in 16 73. It was organized in 1739 as "West 
Parish of Dunstable" and incorporated as Hollis in 1746. In 
1763 "One Pine Hill" was annexed to it. In 1769 the west- 
ern part of Hollis, together with "Mile Slip," was incorporated 
into the town of Brookline ("Raby"). Part of Monson was 
annexed in 1770. Part of "Dunstable" (Nashua) was annexed 
in 1773, and in 1786 and 1787 parts of Hollis were annexed to 
Brookline. Hillsborough county, second congressional, fourth 
councilor and twelfth senatorial districts. Population, 9 35. 

Hooksett was incorporated in 1822 from parts of Chester, 
Dunbarton and GOffstown. The Chester portion had been 
known as "Chester Woods" or "White Pine Country." "Hook- 
sett Pinnacle" and the village were known in colonial days as 
"Hanna-Ko-Kees Hills." In 18 53 part of Hooksett was an- 
nexed to Allenstown. Merrimack county, first congressional, 
third councilor and fourteenth senatorial districts. Popula- 
tion, 1,528. 

Hopkinton was granted in 1735 as "No. 5" in the "line of 
towns." The boundaries were established in 1741 and the 



42 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

place was regranted in 1750 to Henry Mellen and others. In 
1763 it was granted town privileges, and part of Bow was an- 
nexed. It was incorporated in 1765. It was named after 
Hopkinton, Mass., by John Jones, one of the grantees. It 
was a shire town of Hillsborough county until Merrimack 
county was formed in 1823. The legislature met in Hopkin- 
ton in 1798, 1801, 1806 and 1807. Merrimack county, sec- 
ond congressional, fifth councilor and ninth senatorial dis- 
tricts. Population, 1,578. 

Hudson was part of "Dunstable" in the grant by the govern- 
ment of Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1673. It was incor- 
porated as "Nottingham" in 1722. In 1746 it was incor- 
porated as "Nottingham West," which was changed in 1830 
to the name of Hudson. In 1778 part of Londonderry was 
annexed. The first settlement on the banks of the river in 
1710 was by families named Hill, Cummings and Blodgett. 
Hillsborough county, first congressional, fourth councilor and 
twenty-second senatorial districts. Population, 1,344. 

Jackson was originally made up from a number of state 
grants that were issued to soldiers who served in the French 
and Indian wars, and were known as the Wentworth, Tread- 
well, Gilman, Gridley and Rogers grants; and the first name of 
the town was "New Madbury." Benjamin Copp made the 
first settlement in 1778, and for twelve years he and his 
family lived there alone. In 179 five other families, Joseph 
Pinkham, Joseph D. Pinkham, Clement Meserve, Jonathan Me- 
serve and John Young settled there. The Meserves petitioned 
to have the town incorporated in 1796, 1797, 1799 and 1800, 
and the fourth request was granted. Upon incorporation the 
name of the town was changed to "Adams" in honor of John 
Adams, who was president. In 1806 the state granted three 
hundred acres of land to the town for school purposes. In 
1819 part of the town was annexed to Bartlett, and in 1822 
part of Bartlett was annexed to "Adams." The name was 
changed to Jackson on the Fourth of July in 1829 in honor of 
Andrew Jackson, who was then president. Part of Bartlett 
was annexed in 1839. Carroll county, first congressional, 
first councilor and fourth senatorial districts. Population, 
452. 

Jaffrey was granted in 1749 by the Masonian Proprietors to 
Jonathan Hubbard and others, and was known as "Monad- 
nock No. 2," "Middle Monadnock" and "Middletown." The 
grant was renewed in 1767, and the town was incorporated in 
1773 and named Jaffrey in honor of George Jaffrey. The 
first settlements were made in 1752 by Moses Stickney and 
others, who soon abandoned the place; but six years later 
permanent settlements were made by John Grout and others. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 43 

Cheshire county, second congressional, fourth councilor and 
eleventh senatorial districts. Population, 1,89 5. 

Jefferson was granted in 1765 to Colonel John Goffe and 
others, and was known as "Dartmouth." It was regranted 
in 1772 to Theodore Atkinson and others, and settlements were 
then made by Colonel Joseph Whipple and Samuel Hart of 
Portsmouth. The town was incorporated in 1796 and named 
Jefferson in honor of Thomas Jefferson, who was that year 
elected vice-president. Part of Kilkenny was annexed in 1842. 
Coos county, second congressional, first councilor and second 
senatorial districts. Population, 1,061. 

Kensington was part of Hampton from 1638 to 1718, when 
Hampton Falls was set off and Kensington was set off from 
Hampton Falls and incorporated in 1737 and named after an 
English town, Rev. Jeremiah Fogg was the first minister, 
1737-89. Rockingham county, first congressional, second 
councilor and twenty-third senatorial districts. Population, 
417. 

Kingston was partly included in the original grant of Hamp- 
ton, and was set off and granted in 1694 to James Prescott 
and others, and was called "King's-town" until about 1800, 
when the spelling was changed to its present form. The early 
settlers made a peace treaty with the Indians in 1713. East 
Kingston was set off and incorporated in 1738, Sandown in 
1756 and Danville in 1760. Part of Kingston was annexed 
to Plaistow in 1831. Rockingham county, first congressional, 
second councilor and twenty-third senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 1,015. 

Lancaster was granted in 1763 to David Page and others and 
incorporated. It had been known as "Upper Coos," and was 
given its new name after Lancaster, Mass. Settlements were 
begun the following year by the grantee and others, and in 
1769 the charter was renewed. "Barker's Location" was 
annexed in 1819, part of Stark in 1840 and part of Kilkenny 
in 1842. In 1914 the town celebrated its one hundred fiftieth 
anniversary. Coos county, second congressional, first coun- 
cilor and second senatorial districts. Population, 3,054. 

Landaff was granted in 1764 to James Avery and others and 
regranted in 1770 to Dartmouth college, after which settle- 
ments were made. In 1774 the place was incorporated. 
After the Revolution the first grantees forced the college to 
give up its title. In 1845 part of Lincoln was annexed. In 
1859 all of Landaff lying northwest of the Ammonoosuc river 
was annexed to Lisbon. In 1876 part of Landaff was set off 
and incorporated as Easton. Grafton county, second congres- 



44 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

sional, first councilor and third senatorial districts. Popula- 
tion, 526. 

Langdon was made up from parts of Charlestown and Wal- 
pole and incorporated in 1787 in honor of John Langdon, gov- 
ernor. Settlements had been made as early as 1773 by Seth 
Walker, and the next year by Nathaniel Rice and Jonathan 
Willard. In 1795 the town refused to extend its territory to 
the Connecticut river. Sullivan county, second congressional, 
fifth councilor and eighth senatorial districts. Population, 
340. 

Lebanon was granted in 1761 to Nehemiah Estabrook and 
others, some of whom came from Lebanon, Connecticut, for 
which the town was named. Early settlers were William 
Dana, William Downer, Silas Waterman and Nathaniel Por- 
ter, and the place was the first settled on the Connecticut 
river north of Charlestown. Lebanon at one time voted to 
become a part of Vermont. Grafton county, second congres- 
sional, first councilor and fifth senatorial districts. Popula- 
tion, 5,718. 

Liee was set off from Durham and incorporated in 1766, and 
the line between these two towns was established in 1818. 
Strafford county, first congressional, second councilor and 
twenty-first senatorial districts. Population, 479. 

Lempster was granted in 1735 by Massachusetts Colony as 
"No. 9." It was regranted by New Hampshire in 1753 to Sam- 
uel C. Pain and others, and was called "Dupplin." It was 
regranted in 1761 to Benadam Gallop and others and in- 
corporated as Lempster. Another regrant was made in 1767 
to Dudley Woodbridge and others, and in 1770 some Connecti- 
cut people settled the place. The charter was renewed in 
1772. Part of Lempster was included in the incorporation 
of Goshen in 1791. The line between Lempster and Washing- 
ton was established November 27, 1812. Sullivan county, 
second congressional, fifth councilor and eighth senatorial dis- 
tricts. Population, 383. 

Lincoln was granted in 1764 to James Avery and others. 
In 1845 part of the town was annexed to Landaff and most of 
this territory later became parts of Lisbon and Easton. Lin- 
coln is a lumber center. In 1901 the legislature authorized 
the annexation of part of Livermore, and this was completed 
in 1908. Grafton county, second congressional, first coun- 
cilor and third senatorial districts. Population, 1,278. 

Lisbon was granted in 1763 to Joseph Burt and others and 
was known as "Concord." The following year it was granted 
to John Fansher and others and called "Chiswick." In 1768 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 45 

it was granted to Leonard Whiting and others and called 
"Gunthwaite." Settlements under the various grants led to 
a controversy. In 1824 the name was changed to Lisbon, and 
in 1859 all of Landaff northwest of the Ammonoosuc river was 
annexed to Lisbon. Grafton county, second congressional, first 
councilor and third senatorial districts. Population, 2,460. 

Litchfield was originally a part of "Old Dunstable" and was 
known as "Naticook." Massachusetts Colony granted the 
place in 1729 and gave it the name "Brenton's Farm." In 
1734 the name was changed to Litchfield and in 1749 it was 
incorporated. People from Billerica and Chelmsford, Mass., 
made the first settlement in 1720. Hillsborough county, first 
congressional, fourth councilor and twenty-second senatorial 
districts. Population, 255. 

Littleton was granted in 1764 to James Avery and others 
as a part of "Cheswick." It was regranted in 1770 to Moses 
Little and others and called "Apthorp," in honor of George 
Apthorp of England, one of the grantees. In 1784, when New 
Hampshire became a state, the northern part of "Apthorp" 
was incorporated as Dalton and the southern part as Littleton, 
in honor of Moses Little, the principal grantee. Captain Na- 
than Caswell was the first settler in 1770. In the western 
part of the town, at "Pattenville", is the site of an old fort, 
where the soldiers in the Revolutionary war left their women 
and children when they crossed into Vermont to take part, 
under command of Ethan Allen, at Fort Ticonderoga. Graf- 
ton county, second congressional, first councilor and third 
senatorial districts. Population, 4,069. 

Livermore was made up of grants to Elkins, Sargent and 
Elkins, Hatch and Cleaves, Raymond, and Bean and Gil- 
man in 1876, and named in honor of the Livermore family. 
In 1901 the legislature authorized the annexation of part of 
the town to Lincoln, and this annexation was completed in 
19 08. Grafton county, second congressional, first councilor 
and fourth senatorial districts. Population, 64. 

Londonderry was formerly known as "Nutfield," and was 
granted in 1722 to John Moor, and called Londonderry after 
the Irish town. In 1740 the town was divided into two par- 
ishes. In 1741 part of it was set off and incorporated as 
Windham. In 1751 the northwestern part was put into "Der- 
ryfield" (Manchester). In 1777 parr was annexed to Wind- 
ham, and part to Hudson in 1778. The line between Lon- 
donderry and Windham was established in 1782, and in 1805 
another part of Londonderry was annexed to Windham. In 
1827 the eastern part of the town was set off and incorporated 
as Derry. At that time Londonderry ranked as the first town 



46 NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 

in the state. Rockingham county, first congressional, third 
councilor and twenty-second senatorial districts. Population, 
1,533. 

Loudon was set off from Canterbury in 1765 and incor- 
porated in 1773, and named in honor of the Earl of Loudon. 
Jethro Bachelder, Abraham Bachelder and Moses Ordway 
were the first settlers in 1760. Part of Loudon was annexed 
to Concord in 1784 and part of Canterbury annexed to Lou- 
don in 1853. Merrimack county, first congressional, fifth 
councilor and fourteenth senatorial districts. Population, 
838. 

Lyman was granted in 1761 to eleven men named Lyman 
and fifty-two others. The charter was renewed in 1769, but 
there were few settlements there before the Revolution. In 
1854 that part of the town west of Gardner's mountain was 
set off and incorporated into Monroe. Grafton county, second 
congressional, first councilor and third senatorial districts. 
Population, 374. 

Lyme was granted in 1761 to John Thompson and others. 
The first settlements were three years later by William Sloan, 
John Sloan and "Walter Fairfield, who named the town for 
Lyme, Connecticut. The charter was renewed in 1770. 
Grafton county, (second congressional, first councilor and 
fifth senatorial districts. Population, 1,007. 

Lyndeborough was granted in 1735 by Massachusetts Col- 
ony to Captain Samuel King and others and called "Salem- 
Canada." The Masonian Proprietors granted the place in 
1753 to Benjamin Lynde, for whom the town was named, and 
in 1764 it was incorporated. The first settlements were 
made in 1750. Part of Lyndeborough was set off and incor- 
porated with other territory as Greenfield in 1791, part was 
annexed to Temple in 1796, part to Mont Vernon in 1853 and 
part to Milford in 1873. Hillsborough county, second con- 
gressional, fourth councilor and twelfth senatorial districts. 
Population, 660. 

Madbury was made up from parts of Dover and Durham. 
It became an incorporated parish in 1755 and a town in 1768. 
An attempt to incorporate in 1743 had proven unsuccessful. 
Strafford county, first congressional, second councilor and 
twenty-first senatorial districts. Population, 331. 

Madison was granted in 1760 as part of the town of Eaton 
to Clement March and sixty-five associates. In 1785 the first 
house was built by John Banfill. In 1852 Eaton was divided 
and the town of Madison incorporated out of one part and 
named in honor of James Madison, former president. Car- 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 47 

roll county, first congressional, first councilor and fourth 
senatorial districts. Population, 507. 

Marlborough was granted in 1752 by the Masonian Pro- 
prietors to James Morrison and others, and was known as 
"Monadnock No. 5." Early settlers came from Marlbor- 
ough, Mass., and called the place "New Marlborough." It 
was incorporated as Marlborough in 1776. The first settlers 
in 1760 were Abel Woodward, Benjamin Tucker, Daniel 
Goodenough and others. Part of Swanzey was annexed in 
1794. Part of Marlborough with other territory was incor- 
porated into Roxbury in 1812 and another part into Troy in 
1815. Part of Dublin was annexed in 1818 and part of Swan- 
zey in 1842. In 1870 part of Troy was annexed. Cheshire 
county, second congressional, fourth councilor and eleventh 
senatorial districts. Population, 1,478. 

Marlow was granted in 1753 to Elias Alexander and oth- 
ers and was called "Addison." It was regranted in 1761 to 
William Noyes and others and named Marlow after an Eng- 
lish town. The charter was renewed in 1772. Thomas 
Gustin, Samuel Gustin, Elisha Mack, Solomon Mack, Jasper 
Huntley, Nathan Huntley and Joseph Tubbs were the first 
settlers. All of Marlow east of the "curve line" was an- 
nexed to Stoddard in 1797. Cheshire county, second con- 
gressional, fourth councilor and tenth senatorial districts. 
Population, 425. 

Mason was granted in 1749 by the Masonian Proprietors to 
William Lawrence and others and was called "No. 1." In 
1768 the place was incorporated and the inhabitants voted 
to call it "Sharon," but the governor named it Mason in 
honor of Captain John Mason. Part of the town was set off 
and incorporated as Greenville in 1872. Hillsborough 
county, second congressional, fourth councilor and twelfth 
senatorial districts. Population, 825. 

Meredith was granted in 1748 by the Masonian Proprietors 
to Samuel Palmer and others and was called "Palmer's town." 
Early settlers came from Salem and changed its name to 
"New Salem." It was incorporated in 1768 as Meredith and 
in 1799 "Stone-dam" and "Bear Islands" were annexed. Part 
of the town was set off in 1855 and incorporated as Laconia. 
Part of Meredith was annexed to Center Harbor in 1873. 
Belknap county, first congressional, fifth councilor and sixth 
senatorial districts. Population, 1,800 (estimated). 

Merrimack was part of the grant of "Old Dunstable" and 
was originally named "Naticook" by the Indians. In 1729 
the land north of the Souhegan river, a strip three miles 



48 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

wide, was granted to Captain Joseph Blanchard and others. 
In 1733 these previous grants, lying north of Pennichuck 
Brook and including a part of "Narragansett No. 5" (now 
Amherst, granted to the soldiers of King Philip's war) were 
incorporated into a township and named "Souhegan East." 
Later the name was changed to "Rumford" and then to "Mer- 
rimac." In 1746 the legislature chartered the town and it 
contained 19,361 acres of land. In 1750 an addition of that 
part of the town lying north of the Souhegan river was 
granted. The first settlements in town were in 1722 by the 
Usher, Hassell, Blanchard, Chamberlain and other families. 
In this town was discovered and developed the making of 
"leghorn bonnets" and other grass work, the Misses Burwap 
engaging in this industry before 1820. Edward Goldstone 
Lutwyche, a wealthy English gentleman, lived in this town 
when the Revolution broke out at what was then called "Lut- 
wyche's Ferry," and was a colonel in the army. He joined 
the British in the Revolution and the state confiscated his 
estate and changed the name to "Thornton's Ferry," in honor 
of Matthew Thornton, a signer of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, who lived here. Hillsborough county, first congres- 
sional, fourth councilor and twelfth senatorial districts. 
Population, 1,039. 

Middleton was granted in 1749 by the Masonian Proprie- 
tors to Ebenezer Barney and others and was called "Middle- 
town." The charter was renewed in 1770 and the place in- 
corporated as Middleton in 1778. The northern part of the 
town, after an unsuccessful attempt in 1785, was severed in 
1794 and incorporated into Brookfield. Strafford county, 
first congressional, second councilor and twentieth senatorial 
districts. Population, 291. 

Milan was granted in 1771 to Sir William Mayne and 
others and named "Paulsbourg" in honor of Paul Wentworth. 
It was incorporated as Milan in 1824. Coos county, second 
congressional, first councilor and first senatorial districts. 
Population, 924. 

Milford was granted by the Massachusetts Colony to of- 
ficers and soldiers who served the province in the Narra- 
gansett war, in the recognition of brave and patriotic deeds. 
The grants were made during the period from 1728 to 1733. 
Part of the present Milford was in the small town of "Mon- 
son," which was granted by Massachusetts and incorporated 
in 1746. In 1770 "Monson" was divided between Amherst 
and Hollis. In 1794 Milford was incorporated out of parts 
of Hollis, Amherst, "Mile Slip," "Monson," "Souhegan West" 
and "Duxbury School Farms." It was composed of five par- 
cels of land. The first settlements were in 1740 by William 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 49 

Peabody, John Shepard, Benjamin Hopkins, John Burns, Na- 
than Hutchinson, Abner Hutchinson, Elisha Towne, Caleb 
Jones, Andrew Bradford, Captain Josiah Crosby and William 
Wallace. Part of Milford was annexed to Amherst in 1842 
and part of Lyndeborough was annexed to Milford in 1873. 
Hillsborough county, second congressional, fourth councilor 
and twelfth senatorial districts. Population, 3,939. 

Milton was originally a part of Rochester, known as "Third 
Parish" or "Northeast Parish," and in 1802 it was set off 
and incorporated. The first settlement was by Jonathan 
Twombly, about 1760. The second settler was Richard 
Walker. Milton Mills was settled about 178 5. The town 
was called during the early settlements "Palmer's Mills" and 
"Three Ponds." The town furnished eight men for the Rev- 
olutionary army, fifty-four for the second war with England 
and one hundred fifty for the Civil War. In 18 58 part of 
Milton was annexed to Wakefield. Strafford county, first con- 
gressional, second councilor and twentieth senatorial districts. 
Population, 1,542. 

Monroe was set off from Lyman and incorporated in 1854, 
and comprised that part of Lyman west of Gardner's Moun- 
tain, the natural boundary today between the two towns. 
In 1897 part of Bath was annexed. Grafton county, second 
congressional, first councilor and third senatorial districts. 
Population, 500. 

Mont Vernon was set off from Amherst and incorporated 
in 1803. Part of Lyndeborough was annexed in 1853. Hills- 
borough county, second congressional, fourth councilor and 
twelfth senatorial districts. Population, 413. 

Moultonborough was granted to Colonel Jonathan Moulton 
and others, for whom it was named, in 1763, by the Mason- 
ian Proprietors. "Moultonborough Gore" was annexed in 
176 5 and Moultonborough was incorporated in 1777. "Long 
Island" was annexed in 1799. Carroll county, first congres- 
sional, first councilor and fourth senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 783. 

Nelson was granted in 1752 to John Hutchinson and oth- 
ers by the Masonian Proprietors, and was known as "Monad- 
nock No. 6." The grant was renewed in 1767, when the first 
settlements were made by Breed Batchellor and Nathaniel 
Breed. The grant was again renewed in 1774, when the 
town was incorporated and the name changed to "Packers- 
field" in honor of Thomas Packer. In 1777 an attempt was 
made to change the name to "Sullivan," but it was unsuccess- 
ful, and ten years later, in 1787, the northwestern part of 



50 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

"Packersfield" was incorporated, with other territory, into 
the town of Sullivan. In 1812 the southwestern corner was 
combined with other territory to make up the town of Rox- 
bury. In 1814 the name was changed to Nelson in honor of 
Lord Nelson, the hero of Trafalgar. The line between Nel- 
son and Roxbury was changed in 1820, Nelson losing a small 
tract. Part of Stoddard was annexed in 1835. In 1870 
parts of Nelson and Dublin were made into Harrisville. 
Cheshire county, second congressional, fourth councilor and 
tenth senatorial districts. Population, 231. 

New Boston was granted in 1735 by Massachusetts Colony 
to John Simpson and others, who were soldiers in the Canad- 
ian expedition of 169 0, or their heirs. It was named "Lane's 
town," and in 1751 it was regranted to Job Lewis and others. 
The next year an arrangement was made with the Masonian 
Proprietors by which they relinquished their claim to this 
territory and in addition gave a large tract to the west. In 
1763 the town was incorporated and the name changed to 
New Boston, after the capital of Massachusetts, and Colonel 
John Goffe of Bedford called the first town meeting. The 
western section was called "New Boston Addition" until 
1772, when it was incorporated, together with part of "So- 
ciety Land," into Francestown. Several of the grantees and 
early settlers came from Boston, Mass. Part of New Bos- 
ton, in the northeast corner, was annexed to Goffstown in 
1836. In 1887 forty buildings, comprising most of the vil- 
lage, were destroyed by fire. In 189 3 the railroad was ex- 
tended as far as this town. New Boston is the home of 
the "Molly Stark Gun," of Revolutionary war fame. Hills- 
borough county, second congressional, fourth councilor and 
fourteenth senatorial districts. Population, 982. 

Newbury was granted in 1753 by the Masonian Proprietors 
and was called "Dantzic." It was regranted in 1772 to 
John Fisher and others and incorporated in 1778 under the 
name of "Fishersfield" in honor of the grantee. The Ma- 
sonian grant of "Hereford" was included within "Fishers- 
field." Part of the town in 1791 went with other territory 
to incorporate Goshen. Part was annexed to Bradford in 
1796 and another part in 1859. The name of the town was 
changed to Newbury in 1837. It was taken from Cheshire 
county and annexed to Hillsborough county, and later became 
a part of Merrimack county. Second congressional, fifth 
councilor and ninth senatorial districts. Population, 402. 

Newcastle was a part of Portsmouth and commonly known 
as "Great Island" until 1693, when it was set off and incor- 
porated as Newcastle. It was probably named for the "cas- 
tle" on "Great Island," which was officially called Fort Wil- 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 51 

liam and Mary. The earliest settlers were David Thompson, 
Shadrach Walton, Captain Walter Neal, George Jaffrey, Theo- 
dore Atkinson, Shadrach Bell, John Amazeen, Richard Tarle- 
ton, Elias Stileman, James Randall, Nathaniel Fryer, William 
Seavey, James White, Sampson Sheafe and Francis Tucker. 
In 1726 part of Newcastle, together with other territory, was 
incorporated into Rye. The General Assembly or legislature 
met in Newcastle as early as 1684, and for many years this 
town was the seat of provincial government, and the resi- 
dence of the governor is still standing. The first important 
armed action of the revolutionary patriots took place in New- 
castle in 1774, when the "Sons of Liberty," under the com- 
mand of Major John Sullivan and Captain John Langdon, 
went to Fort William and Mary (now Fort Constitution) and 
captured Captain John Cochran and his garrison and carried 
away one hundred barrels of gunpowder to Durham, and this 
powder was afterwards used at the Battle of Bunker Hill. 
In 1791 that part of the town southwest of Little Harbor was 
annexed to Rye. In 1873 the ancient records of the town, 
from 1693 to 1726, were discovered in Hertfordshire in Eng- 
land and were returned to the town hall. Rockingham 
county, first congressional, second councilor and twenty-fourth 
senatorial districts. Population, 624. 

New Durham was granted in 1749 by the Masonian Pro- 
prietors to Jonathan Chesley and others and was called "Co- 
checo Township." It was settled by people from Durham, 
who changed its name to New Durham, and the town was 
incorporated in 1762. "New Durham Gore" was incorpo- 
rated as Alton in 1796. Strafford county, first congressional, 
second councilor and twentieth senatorial districts. Popula- 
tion, 523. 

Newfields was originally a part of Exeter and later (1727) 
of Newmarket. It was one of the four local divisions of New- 
market, those divisions being Newfields, Lamprey River, Pis- 
cassic and the Plains. The name of the division known as 
Newfields was first given in 1681. At that time Edward Hil- 
ton, Jr., and his wife, Ann (Dudley) Hilton, sold to John 
Folsom, Jr., sixteen acres of land, bounded in part by the field 
of the senior Edward Hilton, commonly called Mr. Hilton's 
new field. In 1849 the two divisions, Newfield and Piscassic, 
were incorporated as a town and named "South Newmarket." 
In 1852 part of the town was annexed to Newmarket and in 
1883 part of Newmarket was annexed to South Newmarket. 
Dr. John M. Brodhead of Washington, D. C, a native of New- 
fields, died in "South Newmarket" in 1880, and his will con- 
tained the following provision: "Ten thousand dollars to the 
town of South Newmarket, N. H., for the purpose of purchas- 
ing books for a town library, to be under the control of the 



52 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

selectmen, under the condition that the name of the town shall 
be legally changed to Newfields and so remain. On the same 
condition and for the same purpose I bequeath to said town 
my private library. Neither of these bequests shall take effect 
until the name of the town shall have been changed." The 
name was changed to Newfields in 189 5. Rockingham 
county, first congressional, second councilor and twenty-third 
senatorial districts. Population, 503. 

New Hampton was granted in 1765 to Jonathan Moulton 
and others, the proprietors of Moultonborough, and was named 
"Moultonborough Addition." The town was incorporated as 
New Hampton in 1777 and named after Hampton. Part of 
the town was set off and incorporated as Center Harbor in 
1797. Belknap county, first congressional, fifth councilor and 
fifth senatorial districts. Population, 821. 

Newington was a part of Dover, and settlements were made 
as early as 1670, and the place was commonly known as 
"Bloody Point." In 1713 it was set off from Dover and made 
a parish and the following year took the name of Newington. 
In 1764 it was incorporated. In 1821 part of the town was 
annexed to Portsmouth. Rockingham county, first congres- 
sional, second councilor and twenty-fourth senatorial districts. 
Population, 296. 

New Ipswich was granted in 1735 by the Massachusetts Col- 
ony to John Wainwright, John Choate and other inhabitants 
of Ipswich, Mass. It was regranted by the Masonian Propri- 
etors in 1750 to Reuben Kidder and others. It was incor- 
porated in 1762 as "Ipswich" and the name changed to New 
Ipswich in 1766. The first settlement was in 1738 by Abijah 
Foster, who had a son, Ebenezer Foster, born there; and they 
both died of the smallpox while serving as soldiers in the 
French and Indian war near Crown Point in 1759. The sec- 
ond academy in the state was incorporated in this town in 
1789 as "New Ipswich Academy," eight years after Phillips Ex- 
eter acadmemy in Exeter. The name of "New Ipswich Acad- 
emy" was later changed to Appleton academy. This town was 
originally laid out six miles square, but a piece of "Townsend" 
was annexed to its eastern side and a mile strip was cut off 
from its northern side, so that it is now diamond-shaped. In 
1900 Governor Frank W. Rollins took part in the celebration 
of the town's one hundred fiftieth anniversary. Hillsborough 
county, second congressional, fourth councilor and twelfth 
senatorial districts. Population, 927. 

New London was granted in 1753 by the Masonian Propri- 
etors and named "Heidleburg." It was regranted in 1773 
to Jonas Minot and others and the name changed to "Alex- 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 53 

mdria Addition." In 1779 it was incorporated and the name 
changed to New London after London, England. Part of 
'Kearsarge Gore" was annexed in 179 3, part of Sunapee in 
L804 and another part of Sunapee in 1817. The northern 
?art of New London, together with part of "Kearsarge Gore," 
vas set off and incorporated into Wilmot in 1807. Merrimack 
jounty, second congressional, fifth councilor and seventh sena- 
;orial districts. Population, 805. 

Newmarket was set off from Exeter in 1727 and incorpor- 
ited as a parish. It was granted town privileges in 1737. 
rhe boundary line was changed in 1805, 1807 and 1818. The 
southern part of the town was set off and incorporated in 1849 
is "South Newmarket" (Newfields). Part of "South Newmar- 
iet" was annexed in 1852 and part of Durham in 1870. 
[n 1883 part of Newmarket was annexed to "South Newmar- 
let." Rockingham county, first congressional, second coun- 
cilor and twenty-fourth senatorial districts. Population, 
J, 348. 

Newport was granted in 1753 to Isaac Pennell and others 
md was called "Grenville." It was regranted in 1761 to 
Mathaniel Fish and others and incorporated and named after 
Newport, R. I. Only one of sixty-three grantees was an actual 
settler. The desirable qualities of the valley of the Sugar 
•iver were made known to the people of Killingworth, Conn., 
>y one Eastman, a hunter and trapper, who made expeditions 
lp the Connecticut river. In 1765 and 1766 a family party 
Torn Killingworth settled the town, and in 1769 the charter 
vas permanently renewed. Newport sent forty soldiers to the 
Revolutionary army and twenty to fight in the second war with 
England. Two hundred and forty men went to the Civil War, 
ind one young resident, Andre Champollion, was killed in the 
European war in a trench in northern France, March 23, 
L915. In 1791 part of Newport, together with parts of Suna- 
)ee, Lempster, Newbury and Unity, went into the incorporation 
)f Goshen. Newport was the home of Dexter Richards, who 
established Richard's High School and Richard's Free Library; 
VTrs. Sarah J. Hale, the author of "Mary Had a Little Lamb"; 
Rear Admiral George E. Belknap and Austin Corbin, who es- 
ablished Corbin Park, the largest game preserve in the coun- 
ty. Newport has always been the seat of Sullivan county 
since its creation in 1827. Sullivan county, second congres- 
sional, fifth councilor and eighth senatorial districts. Popu- 
atin, 4,000 (estimated). 

Newton was set off from Hampton in 1749 and incorporated 
md named "Newtown." Captain Josiah Bartlett called the 
irst town meeting. Part of South Hampton was annexed to 
Newton in 1749, and in 1772 the boundary between these 



54 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

towns was established. Part of East Kingston was annexed 
in 1845 and the name was changed to Newton in 1846. Rock- 
ingham county, first congressional, second councilor and 
twenty-third senatorial districts. Population, 962. 

Northfield was set off from Canterbury and incorporated in 
1780. It had been settled about twenty years before. 
Part of Northfield was combined with other territory to make 
up Franklin in 1828, but the same territory was reannexed to 
Northfield in 1830 and put back again into Franklin in 1858. 
Additional land was annexed to Franklin in 1861. Merrimack 
county, first congressional, fifth councilor and seventh sena- 
torial districts. Population, 1,474. 

North Hampton was originally the northern part of Hamp- 
ton and was probably settled in 1690 by two brothers, Samuel 
Dearborn and John Dearborn. The house built by the latter 
is used as a residence to this day. In it was born in 1751 a 
grandson of the builder, Henry Dearborn, who became senior 
major general of the army at the outbreak of the second war 
with England in 1812. The movement to separate the north- 
ern part of Hampton began in 1719, but was unsuccessful until 
1738, when the parish of "North Hill" was established. Four 
years later this parish was incorporated as a town and the 
name changed to North Hampton. The boundary between 
North Hampton and Rye was established in 1792. Rocking- 
ham county, first congressional, second councilor and twenty- 
third senatorial districts. Population, 783. 

Northumberland was granted in 1761 to John Hogg and 
others and was known as "Stonington." It was regranted in 
1771 to Daniel Warner and others and in 1779 was incor- 
porated and its name changed to Northumberland after an 
English town. The first settlements were in 1767 by Thomas 
Burnside and Daniel Spaulding. Parts of Stark were annexed 
in 1855 and 1863. Coos county, second congressional, first 
councilor and second senatorial districts. Population, 2,184. 

Northwood was set off from Nottingham and made a parish 
in 1773. It was originally called "North-woods." The first 
settlements were in 1763 by Increase Bachelder, John Bach- 
elder and Moses Godfrey of North Hampton and Solomon 
Bickford of Durham. The first town meeting was called by 
Benjamin Johnson in 1773 and held at the home of Valentine 
Kenneson. Rockingham county, first congressional, second 
councilor and twenty-second senatorial districts. Population, 
1,059. 

Nottingham was granted by Massachusetts to two hundred 
Boston men and incorporated in 1722 and named after an 
English town, although its inhabitants desired to have the town 
named "New Boston." The first meeting was held at the home 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 55 

f Major John Gilman the same year. Part of the town was 
it off and incorporated into Deerfleld in 1766 and another 
art into Northwood in 1773. Rockingham county, first con- 
ressional, second councilor and twenty-second senatorial dis- 
icts. Population, 607. 

Orange was granted in 1769 to Isaac Fellows and others and 
imed "Cardigan." In 1779 the inhabitants petitioned to 
ive the town incorporated and named "Bradford"; in 1783, 
Middleton"; and in 1789, "Liscomb." In the last petition 
le word "Liscomb" was crossed out and the name Orange in- 
srted, and the town was incorporated in 1790 as Orange, 
art of the town was annexed to Hebron and part of Hebron 
i Orange in 1804, and the line between the two towns was 
itablished in 1808. Part of Orange was annexed to Alex- 
ldria in 182 0. Grafton county, second congressional, first 
tuncilor and fifth senatorial districts. Population, 176. 

Orford was granted in 1761 to Jonathan Moulton, Jr., and 
hers. The previous year several inhabitants of Hampton 
et at the residence of Lieutenant Jonathan Leavitt, an inn- 
)lder, and petitioned Governor Benning Wentworth for a 
iwnship on the eastern bank of the Connecticut river at 
Sugar River." The governor gave to sixty-three proprietors 
deed "unto our loving subjects" for a tract of land six miles 
tuare, beginning at the northwestern corner of Lyme and 
iving its western boundary the river. The river townships 
ere numbered after the early forts built as defense against 
e Indians, and Orford was "No. 7." The name of Orford 
as after an English town and is the only place in America 

that name. The first settlements were made in 1765 by 
miel Cross, General Israel Morey, John Mann and others, 
ho came from Connecticut. The charter was renewed in 
r 72 and in 1778 the town voted to unite with Vermont, 
irt of Orford was annexed to Wentworth in 1837. Grafton 
unty, second congressional, first councilor and fifth sena- 
rial districts. Population, 799. 

Ossipee was named for a tribe of Indians who once lived 
ere and was known originally as "Ossipee Gore" and "New 
irden." It was incorporated as Ossipee in 1785, and in 1820 
at part of "Ossipee Gore" which was not included in Ossi- 
e was annexed to Effingham. Part of Ossipee was annexed 
Tamworth in 1837 and part of this territory was reannexed 
Ossipee in 1859. Carroll county, first congressional, first 
uncilor and fourth senatorial districts. Population, 1,354. 
Pelham was made up from parts of "Old Dunstable," Lon- 
•nderry and Dracut, Mass., and incorporated in 1746 and 
,med in honor of Thomas Pelham Holies, Duke of Newcastle, 
le first permanent settlements were in 1721 and 1722 by 



56 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

John Butler and families by the names of Wyman, Hamblett, 
Jacques and others. For many years title to the town was 
disputed on account of an old Masonian grant, and settlement 
was delayed. In 1774 the Masonian Proprietors confirmed the 
original charter. The town was divided in 1787 into two par- 
ishes and reunited in 1792. In 1824 it was taken from Rock- 
ingham county and annexed to Hillsborough county. In 1830 
a gore of land between Pelham and Windham was annexed to 
Pelham. Beaver brook, running through the town, is spanned 
by three stone bridges, "built with the public money" received 
during the Jackson administration, amounting to $3,800. The 
town has a library, five school districts, two churches, and 
electric railways. First congressional, fourth councilor and 
twenty-second senatorial districts. Population, 826. 

Pembroke was granted in 1728 by the Massachusetts Col- 
ony to Captain John Lovewell and others and was known as 
"Suncook" and "Lovewell's-town." It was incorporated in 
1759 and the name changed to Pembroke in honor of the Earl 
of Pembroke. Walter Bryant called the first town meeting. 
In 1763 the town was divided into two parishes. In 1798 a 
dispute between Pembroke and Allenstown was settled by 
extending the boundary of Pembroke to the Suncook river. 
In 1804 all of Bow lying east of the Merrimack river was 
annexed to Pembroke and Concord. Merrimack county, first 
congressional, fifth councilor and fourteenth senatorial dis- 
tricts. Population, 3,062. 

Peterborough was granted in 1737 by the Massachusetts 
Colony to Samuel Hayward and others and was known as 
"Souhegan." It was incorporated in 1760 and the name 
changed to Peterborough in honor of the Earl of Peterbor- 
ough. The charter was renewed in 1762. The first perma- 
nent settlements were made in 1749. Part of the southeast- 
ern corner of the town was annexed to Temple in 1789. Part 
of Peterborough was included in the territory which went into 
the incorporation of Greenfield in 1791. Hillsborough county, 
second congressional, fourth councilor and eleventh senatorial 
districts. Population, 2,277. 

Piermont was granted in 1764 to John Temple and others 
and was incorporated the same year. Four years later the 
first settlements were made by Daniel Tyler, Levi Root, Ebe- 
nezer White and David Tyler. In 1787 part of the town was 
annexed to Wentworth, but in 1819 and 1822 was reunited 
to Piermont. Grafton county, second congressional, first 
councilor and third senatorial districts. Population, 592. 

Pittsburg was formerly known as "Indian Stream Terri- 
tory" until its incorporation in 1840. Its boundary line was 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 57 

stablished in 1848. It is the largest in territory and the 
lost northern town in the state. Coos county, second con- 
ressional, first councilor and second senatorial districts, 
'opulation, 624. 

Pittsfield was set off from Chichester and incorporated in 
782, and John Cram called the first town meeting. In 1841 
, Pittsfield school district and Epsom school district No. 6 were 
mited to form "Republican School District." In 1870 a fire 
Listrict was established. Merrimack county, first congres- 
ional, fifth councilor and fourteenth senatorial districts. 
Population, 2,222. 

Plainfield was granted in 1761 to Benjamin Hutchins and 
►thers and named for Plainfield, Connecticut. It was settled 
hree years later. Part of the town went with part of Grant- 
lam in 1780 to form the "Parish of Meriden." The Grant- 
lam part of this parish was annexed to Plainfield in 1856. 
Sullivan county, second congressional, fifth councilor and 
ughth senatorial districts. Population, 9 87. 

Plaistow was originally part of Haverhill, Mass., and was 
ncluded in a purchase from the Indians in 1642. It was 
lamed after Plaistow in England. The first settlement in 
L642 was by Captain Charles Bartlett, Nicholas White, Esq., 
Dea. Benjamin Kimball and J. Harriman. The town was in- 
corporated in 1749. Part of it was set off in 1767 and incor- 
porated into Atkinson. Part of Kingston was annexed in 
1831. Rockingham county, first congressional, second coun- 
cilor and twenty-third senatorial districts. Population, 1,173. 

Plymouth was granted in 1763 to Joseph Blanchard and 
others and was sometimes called "New Plymouth." The first 
settlements were in 176 4 by Zachariah Parker, James Hobart, 
Stephen Webster, David Webster and others. The town was 
organized and the first meeting held at the home of Stephen 
Webster in 1766. Parts of Plymouth, with other territory, 
went into the incorporation of Hebron in 179 2. A tract of 
land on the north side was severed by a boundary committee 
and restored in 1793, and other land owned by Nathaniel 
Peabody was annexed at the same time. Part of Hebron was 
annexed in 1845 and the southwestern part of Campton in 
1860. Grafton county, second congressional, first councilor 
and third senatorial districts. Population, 2,200. 

Randolph was granted in 1772 to John Durand and his son, 
Edward Perry, Thomas Brown and Charles Henzell, and was 
named "Durand" in honor of its principal proprietor. In 
1824 the town was incorporated and the name changed to 
Randolph in honor of John Randolph. Coos county, second 



58 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

congressional, first councilor and first senatorial districts. 
Population, 137. 

Raymond was purchased in 1717 from an Indian by Colonel 
Stephen Dudley and was called "Freetown." It was part of 
Chester from the incorporation of that town in 1722 until 
1764, when it was set off and incorporated as a parish and 
named Raymond. Samuel Emerson called the first town meet- 
ing that year. In 1848 the boundary between Raymond and 
Candia was established. Rockingham county, first congres- 
sional, third councilor and twenty-second senatorial districts. 
Population, 1,203. 

Richmond was granted in 1735 by the Massachusetts Col- 
ony to Captain Joseph Sylvester's men and was named "Syl- 
vester-Canada." In 1752 it was granted to Joseph Blanchard 
and others in seventy-one shares and was incorporated and 
its name changed to Richmond. The charter was renewed in 
1760. The northern part of the town was annexed to Swan- 
zey in 1762. Another part was combined with parts of Marl- 
borough, Fitzwilliam and Swanzey to make up the incorpora- 
tion of Troy in 1815. The northwestern corner was annexed 
to Winchester in 1850. Cheshire county, second congres- 
sional, fourth councilor and eleventh senatorial districts. 
Population, 393. 

Rindge was granted in 1736 by the Massachusetts Colony 
to some inhabitants of Rowley, Mass., who engaged in the 
Canadian expedition, and named the town "Rowley-Canada." 
The Masonian Proprietors granted the town in 1749 to Solo- 
mon Stewart and others, who changed the name to "Monad- 
nock No. 1," and later to "South Monadnock." In 1754 it was 
settled by Abel Platts, Joseph Platts, Joel Russell, Nathaniel 
Russell, Ezekiel Jewett, George Hewitt and Jonathan Stanley. 
In 1768 the town was incorporated and the name changed to 
Rindge in honor of Daniel Rindge. The boundary between 
Rindge and Fitzwilliam was established in 1847. Cheshire 
county, second congressional, fourth councilor and eleventh 
senatorial districts. Population, 706. 

Rollinstford was set off from Somersworth and incorporated 
in 1849 and named in honor of the Rollins family. The busi- 
ness part of the town is known as "Salmon Falls." Part of 
Rollinsford was annexed to Dover in 1879. Strafford county, 
first congressional, second councilor and twenty-first senatorial 
districts. Population, 1,836. 

Roxbury was made up from parts of Nelson, Keene and 
Marlborough and incorporated in 1812. In 1868 the question 
of annexation to Keene was submitted to popular vote and de- 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 59 

eated. Cheshire county, second congressional, fourth coun- 
ilor and tenth senatorial districts. Population, 66. 

Rumney was granted in 1761 to Samuel Olmstead and oth- 
srs. The first settlements were in 1765 by Daniel Brainard, 
ronathan Cummings, James Heath and Moses Smart, and in 
1767 the town was regranted to Daniel Brainard and others, 
rhe Union School District of Rumney and Wentworth was 
established in 1842 and its boundaries defined in 1847. 
>rafton county, second congressional, first councilor and fifth 
senatorial districts. Population, 850. 

Rye was originally known as "Sandy Beach" and was set- 
led in 1635. It was a part of Portsmouth until 1693, when 
t became part of the territory incorporated into Newcastle, 
[n 1726 it was cut off from Newcastle and with parts of Ports- 
mouth and Hampton was incorporated into Rye. That part 
)f Newcastle southwest of Little Harbor was annexed in 1791. 
'Gosport" or "Star Island" in the Isle of Shoals was annexed 
in 1876. Rockingham county, first congressional, second 
councilor and twenty-fourth senatorial districts. Population, 
1,014. 

Salem was originally a part of Haverhill, Mass. In 1725 
that part of Haverhill which includes the present town of 
Salem was set off and incorporated by the Massachusetts Col- 
ony into Methuen, Mass. In 1750 Salem was severed from 
Methuen, joined to New Hampshire and incorporated as a 
town. The first settlers were Haverhill people, and among 
them were the Ayer, Peaslee, Dow, Eaton, Clement, Hall, 
Kelly, Woodbury, Wheeler, Webster, Merrill, Pattee, Duston, 
Sanders, Ober, Eastman, Kimball, Hastings, Bayley, Emerson, 
Taylor, Wilson, Rowell, Corning, Austin, Jones, Tenney, Mes- 
ser, Wright, Thorn, Betton and Clendenin families. The 
boundary between Salem and Windham was established in 
1752. The Masonian Proprietors confirmed the charter of 
Salem in 1759. Rockingham county, first congressional, third 
councilor and twenty-second senatorial districts. Population, 
2,117. 

Salisbury was granted in 1736 by the Massachusetts Colony 
and named "Baker's-town." It was regranted in 1749 by the 
Masonian Proprietors to Ebenezer Stevens and others and the 
name changed to "Steven's-town." The name was later 
changed to "Gerrishtown" and then to "New Salisbury," and 
in 1768 it was incorporated with the name of Salisbury. The 
first settlements were about 1750 by Ebenezer Webster, John 
Webster, Edward Eastman, Nathaniel Meloon and Philip Call. 
In 1828 the eastern part of the town, together with parts of 
Andover, Northfield and Sanbornton, was incorporated into 



60 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Franklin. In 1869 part of Franklin was annexed to Salis- 
bury. Merrimack county, second congressional, fifth coun- 
cilor and ninth senatorial districts. Population, 478. 

Sanbornton was granted in 1748 by the Masonian Proprie- 
tors to John Sanborn of Hampton and others, and called 
"Sanborntown," twelve of the sixty grantees being San- 
borns. The northwestern corner of the land claimed by 
Massachusetts was within the limits of the town until 1739, 
and the township is referred to as "Crotchtown" in the Massa- 
chusetts records because of its situation in the fork of the 
Winnepesaukee and Pemigewassett rivers. The activities of 
the Indians prevented permanent settlement until 1764, when 
clearings were begun by Moses and Thomas Danforth, Solo- 
mon Copp, Daniel Fifield, Samuel Sheppard and Andrew 
Rowen. In 1770 Sanbornton was incorporated, having at the 
time "upwards of forty families." In 1827 Sanbornton 
ranked as the third town in the state, Londonderry and Gil- 
manton standing first and second. In 182 8 part of the town 
was cut off to form Franklin, and in 1869 the part of the 
town known as "Sanbornton Bridge" was set off and incor- 
porated as Tilton. In 1870 part of Tilton was annexed to 
Sanbornton and in 1870-1872 parts of Sanbornton were an- 
nexed to Tilton. Belknap county, first congressional, fifth 
councilor and sixth senatorial districts. Population, 9 00. 

Sandown was set off from Kingston and incorporated in 
1756. Colonel Ebenezer Stevens called the first town meet- 
ing. In 1775 the population was 6 35, of whom thirty-four 
men were in the Revolutionary army. Rockingham county, 
first congressional, second councilor and twenty-third sena- 
torial districts. Population, 380. 

Sandwich was granted in 1763 to Samuel Gilman, Jr., and 
others and incorporated. The following year "Sandwich Addi- 
tion" was granted. In 1785 the boundaries between Sand- 
wich, Tamworth and Moultonborough were adjusted, and in 
1808 the boundaries between Sandwich, Tamworth, Eaton and 
Albany. Part of Waterville was annexed in 1864. Carroll 
county, first congressional, first councilor and fourth sena- 
torial districts. Population, 928. 

Seabrook was originally part of Hampton and later of 
Hampton Falls. It was set off and incorporated in 1768. 
Part of Hampton Falls was annexed in 1816 and part of South 
Hampton in 1822, when the western boundary was fixed. 
Rockingham county, first congressional, second councilor and 
twenty-third senatorial districts. Population, 1,428. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 61 

Sharon was made up from a part of "Peterborough Slip" 
id incorporated in 1791, after an unsuccessful attempt to 
Lcorporate had been made in 1777. The question of annexa- 
on to Peterborough was submitted in 1867 to popular vote, 
it was never adopted. Hillsborough county, second congres- 
onal, fourth councilor and eleventh senatorial districts, 
opulation, 71. 

Shelburne was granted in 1668, and regranted in 1769 by 
ing George III to Mark H. Wentworth, Daniel Peirce, Daniel 
ogers and John, Daniel, Isaac and Jotham Rindge. In 
770 the same proprietors received a grant of "Shelburne Ad- 
tion," now the town of Gorham. Theodore Atkinson, sec- 
tary of the province, surveyed the grant in 1771. The first 
ittlers were Hope Austin, Benjamin Ingalls and Daniel In- 
ills, who came in 1770. Two years later came Thomas Green 
^heeler, Nathaniel Porter and Peter Poor, who was later 
illed by the Indians. Mr. Austin and his wife and three chil- 
ren tramped in five feet of snow for twelve miles to make a 
sttlement. In 1820 the town was incorporated, with a popu- 
tion of 205. The Androscoggin river joined by the Rattle 
ver passes through the town. Mt. Moriah, 4,771 feet high, 
the highest elevation, and in 1879 a signal station was 
itablished. In 1836 "Shelburne Addition" was set off and 
icorporated into Gorham. Coos county, second congres- 
onal, first councilor and first senatorial districts. Popula- 
on, 305. 

South Hampton was made up from parts of Amesbury and 
ilisbury, two towns in Massachusetts, and incorporated in 
742. The eastern part of the town was annexed to Hamp- 
>n Falls that same year. Another part of the town was an- 
3xed to Newton in 1749 and the line between South Hampton 
id Newton was established in 1772. Part of South Hampton 
as annexed to Seabrook in 1822. Part of East Kingston 
as annexed in 1824. Rockingham county, first congres- 
onal, second councilor and twenty-third senatorial districts, 
opulation, 279. 

Springfield was granted in 1769 to John Fisher of Ports- 
outh and others and called "Protectworth." The first set- 
ement was in 1772. The town was incorporated in 1794 and 
le name changed to Springfield. "Heath's Gore" was an- 
sxed in 1817. Sullivan county, second congressional, fifth 
mncilor and eighth senatorial districts. Population, 422. 

Stark was granted in 1774 to Jacob Walden and others and 
illed "Percy" in honor of the king's chaplain, Thomas Percy. 

was incorporated in 179 5 with the name "Piercy." Part of 
tratford and all of "General John Winslow's Grant" was 



62 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

annexed in 1832 and the name changed to Stark in honor of 
General John Stark. Part of the town was annexed to Lan- 
caster in 1840, parts to Northumberland in 1855 and 1863, 
and part to Dummer in 1868. Coos county, second congres- 
sional, first councilor and second senatorial districts. Popu- 
lation, 448. 

Stewartstown was granted in 1770 to Sir James Cockburne, 
Sir George Colebrooke and John Stuart of London and John 
Nelson of the Island of Grenada, and was named "Stuart" or 
"Stuart-town" in honor of one of the grantees. It was incor- 
porated in 179 5 and again in 1799 as "Stuart." There were 
no permanent settlements until after the Revolutionary War. 
During the second war with England, in 1812, a fort was built 
in town. Coos county, second congressional, first councilor 
and second senatorial districts. Population, 1,128. 

Stoddard was granted in 1752 by the Masonian Proprietors 
to Colonel Sampson Stoddard and others and was named 
"Monadnock No. 7," which was later changed to "Limerick." 
The charter was renewed in 1767. The town was incor- 
porated in 1774 and the name changed to Stoddard in honor 
of the original grantee. The first settlements were in 1769 by 
John Taggart and others. The southwestern part of the town, 
together with parts of Gilsum, Keene and Nelson, went to 
make up the incorporation of Sullivan in 1787. The lines 
between Stoddard and Gilsum and Marlow were established in 
1797, and all of Marlow east of the "curve line" was annexed. 
Part of the town was annexed to Nelson in 1835. Cheshire 
county, second congressional, fourth councilor and tenth sena- 
torial districts. Population, 257. 

Strafford was set off from Barrington and incorporated in 
182 and named after an English town. Strafford county, 
first congressional, second councilor and twentieth senatorial 
districts. Population, 786. 

Stratford was granted in 1762 to John Prindle and others 
and incorporated with the name "Woodbury." The charter 
was renewed in 1770. In 1773 the town was granted to 
Joshua Wentworth and others and the name changed to Strat- 
ford after an English town. In 1779 it was reincorporated. 
The first settlers were Isaac Johnson, Archippus Blodgett and 
others. The southeastern part of the town was annexed to 
Stark in 1832. Coos county, second congressional, first coun- 
cilor and second senatorial districts. Population, 844. 

Stratham was granted in 1629 to Edward Hilton and was 
called "Winnicott," being a part of "the Squamscott Patent." 
In 1716 the town was incorporated and the name changed to 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 63 

itratham after Lady Stratham of England, who gave the bell 
or the first church for the privilege of naming the town. Part 
f Stratham was annexed to Greenland in 1805 and another 
art in 1847. The line between Stratham and Newmarket was 
hanged in 1805 and again in 1807. In 1916 the town held 
bicentennial celebration of its charter. Rockingham county, 
rst congressional, second councilor and twenty-fourth sena- 
Drial districts. Population, 6 02. 

Sullivan was made up and incorporated in 1787 out of the 
orners of Stoddard, "Packersfield" (now Nelson), Keene and 
ilsum, and was named in honor of General John Sullivan of 
le Revolutionary army. The first settlements were in 1768 
y Stephen Griswold and Benjamin Olcott. William Comstock 
Bttled in 1770. A small part of Keene was annexed in 1794 
nd in 1874 a few rods of land in Sullivan were annexed to 
ilsum. Cheshire county, second congressional, fourth coun- 
llor and tenth senatorial districts. Population, 266. 

Sunapee was originally called "Corey's-town" in honor of 
liver Corey, to whom it was granted in 1768. The name was 
iter changed to "Saville." In 1781 the town was incor- 
orated and the next year the name changed to "Wendell" in 
onor of John Wendell of Portsmouth, one of the grantees, 
he southern part of the town, together with parts of New- 
ort, Newbury, Lempster and Unity, was incorporated as 
oshen in 1791. Parts of "Wendell" were annexed to New 
ondon in 1804 and 1817. The town changed its name to 
unapee in 1850. It is a popular summer resort. Sullivan 
junty, second congressional, fifth councilor and eighth sena- 
>rial districts. Population, 1,071. 

Surry was incorporated and granted in 1769 out of 12,212 
cres of the towns of Westmoreland and Gilsum, the West- 
Loreland part being previously known as "Westmoreland 
eg." It was named after an English town. Obadiah Wil- 
3x was the first member of the legislature in 1776 and he 
so represented Alstead and Marlow. Early settlers in the 
iwn were Peter Haywood, who called the first town meeting; 
aptain Thomas Harvey, Moses Field, Lemual Holmes and 
bner Skinner. At one time Surry voted to be a part of 
ermont. Cheshire county, second congressional, fourth 
mncilor and tenth senatorial districts. Population, 213. 

Sutton was granted in 1749 by the Masonian Proprietors to 
oadiah Perry and fifty-nine others and named "Perry's- 
>wn." The charter was renewed in 1752 and 1773. The 
>wn was incorporated in 1784 and the name changed to Sut- 
>n after a Massachusetts town. David Peaslee and his son, 
imuel, who settled there in 1767, found traces of an Indian 



64 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

village on the west side of Kezar's pond. Merrimack county, 
second congressional, fifth councilor and ninth senatorial dis- 
tricts. Population, 698. 

Swanzey was granted in 1733 by the Massachusetts Colony 
to Nathaniel Hammond and others and named "Lower Ashue- 
lot." Settlements were made, but in 1747 they were 
abandoned on account of the withdrawal of guards on the 
frontier. Settlers returned in 1750, and in 1753 they had 
the town incorporated, and changed its name to Swanzey after 
a Massachusetts town. Part of Richmond was annexed in 
1762. Part of Swanzey was annexed to Marlborough in 1794, 
another part in 1842 and part to Keene in 1812. Part of the 
town was taken by the incorporation of Troy in 1815. 
Cheshire county, second congressional, fourth councilor and 
eleventh senatorial districts. Population, 1,656. 

Tamworth was granted in 1766 to Lieutenant John Web- 
ster and others and was named after an English town. The 
first settlements were made in 1771 by William Eastman, 
Richard Jackman, David Philbrick and Jonathan Choate. The 
boundaries between Tamworth and Sandwich were adjusted 
in 178 5, between Tamworth and Albany and Eaton in 1796, 
and between Tamworth and Sandwich, Albany and Eaton in 
1808. Part of Ossipee was annexed in 1837 and taken back 
again by Ossipee in 1859. Part of Albany was annexed to 
Tamworth in 1857. Carroll county, first congressional, first 
councilor and fourth senatorial districts. Population, 993. 

Temple was granted in 1750 by Masonian Proprietors and 
called "Peterborough Slip," which was later changed to "Slip- 
town." This included what is now Sharon. The town was 
incorporated in 1768 and the name changed to Temple in 
honor of John Temple. Ephraim Heald called the first town 
meeting in 1768, and for many years there was disputed land 
between Temple and New Ipswich, which was finally annexed 
to Temple. "Borland's Farm" was annexed in 1781, part of 
Peterborough in 1789 and part of Lyndeborough in 1796. 
Hillsborough county, second congressional, fourth councilor 
and twelfth senatorial dsitricts. Population, 284. 

Thornton was granted in 1763 to Matthew Thornton and 
others and named in his honor. It was regranted in 1768 
and additional territory annexed to it. The first settlements 
were in 1770. The town was incorporated in 1781 and Moses 
Baker called the first meeting. The town's bounds were estab- 
lished in 1808. "Blanchard's Gore" was annexed in 1807 
and "Waterville Gore" in 1842. Grafton county, second con- 
gressional, first councilor and third senatorial districts. 
Population, 553. 



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NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 65 

Tilton was formerly known as "Sanbornton Bridge." It 
as set off from Sanbornton and incorporated in 1869 and 
amed in honor of Nathaniel Tilton, who was the first settler 
l 1768. Part of Tilton was annexed to Sanbornton in 1870 
id part of Sanbornton to Tilton in 1870-72. Belknap county, 
rst congressional, fifth councilor and seventh senatorial dis- 
icts. Population, 1,866. 

Troy was incorporated in 1815 from parts of Marlborough, 
itzwilliam, Swanzey and Richmond and named in honor of 
ie ancient city. The first person to settle on territory now 
ithin the town was William Barker, a native of Westborough, 
ass., who came in 1761 and settled in the west part. Some 
Lree or four years later Silas Fife came from Bolton, Mass., 
id settled in the east part. As the inhabitants increased, 
lite a settlement was made on the border between Fitzwil- 
im and Marlborough, which was easier of access than the 
inter of these towns and more convenient for transacting 
isiness, so that about 1781 the question of forming a new 
wn was agitated. The agitation kept recurring, and each 
me was vigorously opposed by the towns interested until 
SI 5, when they allowed the act of incorporation to go 
irough. The town comprises an area of a little more than 
felve miles. Since the formation of the town eleven persons 
ive served as treasurer, the present incumbent since 1874; 
id seventeen persons as town clerk, the last since 1888. 
tie boundary between Troy and Marlborough was established 
1847, and in 1870 part of Troy was annexed to Marlbor- 
lgh. Cheshire county, second congressional, fourth coun- 
lor and eleventh senatorial districts. Population, 1,331. 

Tuftonboro was granted in 1750 by the Masonian Proprie- 
ts to John Tufton Mason and named "Tuftonborough" in 
s honor. Later the name was changed. Woodbury Lang- 
Dn once purchased a large part of the town. No settle- 
ents were made until during the Revolutionary War in 
780 to 1785. An inventory in 1788 contained the names of 
tirteen settlers, including Phineas Graves, Benjamin Bean, 
dward Moody, Obadiah Brown, William C. Warren, Hanson 
ibbey, Jonathan Brown, James Whitehouse, William Melling, 
Lisha Abbott, Benjamin Young and Grafton Nutter. In 1790 
iere were one hundred nine residents, and in 179 5 the town 
as incorporated. The first meeting was held the following 
3ar in the home of William Copp. A road from Wolfeboro 
i Tuftonboro was laid out in 1796. Cow Island was annexed 
i 1799. Four more islands were annexed in 1858. A small 
act of land was set off to Wolfeboro in 1858. Another 
land was annexed in 1863. In 1800 a Congregational 
mrch was organized, and later merged with the Methodist 
lurch. The town house was built in 1819; the first Christian 



66 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

church established in 1820; the Free Baptist in 1837, and the 
second Christian in 1864. The town furnished one hundred 
twenty-eight soldiers for the Civil War. Carroll county, first 
congressional, first councilor and fourth senatorial districts. 
Population, 612. 

Unity was granted in 1753 to John Bissell and others and 
named "Buckingham" in honor of the Duke of Buckingham. 
It was regranted in 1764 to Timothy Goodwin and others and 
incorporated with the name Unity. Part of the town went to 
make up the incorporation of Goshen in 1791, part was an- 
nexed to Charlestown in 1810, part was annexed to Goshen in 
1837, and the northwestern corner was annexed to Claremont 
in 1828. Sullivan county, second congressional, fifth coun- 
cilor and eighth senatorial districts. Population, 504. 

Wakefield was granted in 1749 by the Masonian Proprietors 
to John Ham and others and was named "Ham's-town." This 
was later changed to "East-town" and later to "Watertown." 
In 1774 the town was incorporated and the name again 
changed to Wakefield. In 1820 that part of the town north 
of "Province Pond" was annexed to Effingham. Part of Mil- 
ton was annexed in 18 58. Carroll county, first congressional, 
second councilor and fourth senatorial districts. Population, 
1,543. 

Walpole was granted in 1736 by the Massachusetts Colony 
to John Flint and others and was known as "No. 3" in the line 
of towns on the eastern bank of the Connecticut river. The 
first settlement was in 1749 by John Kilburn and his family. 
It was regranted by New Hampshire in 1752 to Benjamin Bel- 
lows and others and incorporated with the name Walpole, after 
an English town. It was sometimes known as "Great Falls" 
or "Bellows-town." The charter was renewed in 1761. In 
1773 Mr. Bellows was given ferry privileges across the Con- 
necticut. In 1783 the right to build a toll bridge at Bellows 
Falls was granted Colonel Enoch Hale. Part of Walpole, to- 
gether with part of Charlestown, was incorporated into Lang- 
don in 1787. Cheshire county, second congressional, fourth 
councilor and tenth senatorial districts. Population, 2,668. 

Warner was granted in 1735 by the Massachusetts Colony 
to Thomas Stevens and others and was known as "No. 1" in 
the line of towns between the Merrimack and Connecticut 
rivers. Early settlers came from Amesbury, Mass., and named 
this place "New Amesbury." In 1749 the Masonian Proprie- 
tors regranted the town to Richard Jenness and other inhabi- 
tants of Rye, who changed the name to "Jennesstown" and 
later to "Ryetown." In 1767 it was regranted to Jonathan 
Barnard and others. In 1774 it was incorporated and the 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 67 

name changed to Warner in honor of Colonel Jonathan 
Warner of Portsmouth. "Kearsarge Gore" was annexed in 
7 818. Merrimack county, second congressional, fifth coun- 
cilor and ninth senatorial districts. Population, 1,226. 

Warren was granted in 1763 to John Page and others and 
named in honor of Admiral Sir Peter Warren of the British 
Navy. It was incorporated that same year and the charter 
was renewed, with additional territory, in 1770. The first 
settlement was in 176 7 by Joseph Patch. The boundaries 
were established in 1784. Grafton county, second congres- 
sional, first councilor and fifth senatorial districts. Popula- 
tion, 701. 

Washington was granted in 1735 by the Massachusetts Col- 
ony and called "No. 8" in the line of towns between the Mer- 
rimack and Connecticut rivers. The Masonian Proprietors 
granted it in 1752 to Captain Peter Prescott and others, and 
regranted it in 176 8 to Reuben Kidder and others. The char- 
ter was renewed in 1772. The name was changed from 
"Monadnock No. 8" to "New Concord," then to "Camden," 
and finally, in 1776, to Washington, and it was incorporated 
in honor of George Washington. This was the first town in 
the country to take the name of the first president. The 
first settlers in Washington came in 1768 from New Ipswich 
and other places, some of them from Massachusetts. Among 
the early settlers whose descendants still live in the town, or 
did until recently, were Jacob Burbank, Ebenezer Spaulding, 
David Lowell, Ephraim Severence, John Safford, Samuel Cope- 
land, Jonathan Brockway and Simeon Farnsworth. The town 
was in Cheshire county until 182 7, when it went into the new 
county of Sullivan. Part of the town, together with "New 
Bradford" and "Washington Gore," made up the incorporation 
of Bradford in 1787. The boundary between Washington and 
Lempster was established in 1812. Sullivan county, second 
congressional, fifth councilor and eighth senatorial districts. 
Population, 36 0. 

Waterville was granted as a part of the Gillis and Foss 
Grant to John Raymond. The first settlement was in 1819 by 
Moses Foss. In 1829 the town was incorporated as Water- 
ville. Part of it was annexed to Sandwich in 1864. Graf- 
ton county, second congressional, first councilor and fourth 
senatorial districts. Population, 16. 

Weare was granted in 1735 by the Massachusetts Colony to 
Robert Hale on behalf of the soldiers of Captain John Ray- 
mond. It was named "Beverly-Canada," later changed to 
"Halestown." In 1749 the Masonian Proprietors granted the 
town to Ichabod Robie and others and changed the name to 



68 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

"Robie's-town," later to "Weare's-town." In 1764 it was 
incorporated as Weare in honor of Meshech Weare, first gov- 
ernor (president) of the state. The boundary between Weare 
and Dunbarton was established in 1853. Hillsborough county, 
second congressional, fourth councilor and fourteenth sena- 
torial districts. Population, 1,325. 

Webster was set off from Boscawen and incorporated in 
1860. It was named in honor of Daniel Webster. Merri- 
mack county, second congressional, fifth councilor and ninth 
senatorial districts. Population, 445. 

Wentworth was granted in 1766 to John Page and others 
and incorporated and named in honor of Governor Benning 
Wentworth. It was regranted in 1772 to Asa Porter and 
others. Part of Piermont was annexed in 1787 and reunited 
to Piermont in 1819 and 1822, and part of Orford annexed in 
1837. The Union School district of Rumney and Wentworth 
was established in 1842 and its boundaries defined in 1847. 
Grafton county, second congressional, first councilor and fifth 
senatorial districts. Population, 59 5. 

Wentworth's Location became a town in 1881, being the 
youngest town in the state. Coos county, second congres- 
sional, first councilor and first senatorial districts. Popula- 
tion, 51. 

Westmoreland was granted in 1735 by the Massachusetts 
Colony and was known as "No. 2" in the line of towns east 
of the Connecticut river. It was later called "Great Meadows." 
In 1752 New Hampshire granted it to Thomas Chamberlain 
and others, who incorporated it as Westmoreland. The charter 
was renewed in 1760. The first settlements were in 1741 by 
Daniel How, Jethro Wheeler, Philip Alexander and Thomas 
Orissen, who came in canoes from Northfield. For many years 
the Indians were active in that vicinity. Part of the town, 
known as "Westmoreland Leg," went into the incorporation 
of Surry in 1769. Cheshire county, second congressional, 
fourth councilor and tenth senatorial districts. Population, 
758. 

Whitefield was granted in 1774 to Josiah Moody and oth- 
ers, who named it "Whitefields." In 1801 the first settle- 
ments were made by Colonel Joseph Kimball, Major John 
Burns and John McMaster. In 1804 it was incorporated and 
the name changed to Whitefield. The first town meeting was 
held the following year at the home of Major Burns. In 
1824 the postoffice was established and William Dodge was 
the first postmaster. Coos county, second congressional, first 
councilor and second senatorial districts. Population, 1,635. 



NEW HAMPSHIKE MANUAL. 69 

Wilmot was incorporated in 1807 from parts of New Lon- 
don and "Kearsarge Gore." Part of Hill was annexed in 1832. 
Parts of Wilmot were annexed to Danbury in 1848 and 1878. 
Merrimack county, second congressional, fifth councilor and 
seventh senatorial districts. Population, 614. 

Wilton was granted in 1749 by the Masonian Proprietors 
to Thomas Read and others and was known as "No. 2." The 
first settlements were in 1739 by James Putnam, Ephraim 
Putnam and John Badger, the last named being a son of an 
English nobleman. In 1744 a petition signed by several resi- 
dents, including John Cram, John Dale, Joseph Cram, Jona- 
than Cram, Ephraim Putnam, Samuel Putnam, Benjamin Cram 
and John Stephens, was presented to Governor Wentworth, 
praying for protection against the Indians. The town was 
surveyed originally as five miles square, divided into ten 
ranges of twenty lots of land each. Each lot was 160 by 
80 rods. In 1762 the town was incorporated and the name 
changed to Wilton after an English town. In 1768 the tenth 
range of the town was taken to help make the incorporation 
of Temple. Ancestors of Reverend Lyman Abbott of New 
York City, a famous editor and preacher, lived in Wilton as 
early as 1765, one member of the family inventing a machine 
for making starch in 1811 and conducting a business in Wil- 
ton. The Masonian Proprietors at an unknown date annexed 
part of Lyndeborough to Wilton. In 1869 a freshet carried 
away every bridge in town, with mill and dams, and did a 
damage of $150,000. Hillsborough county, second congres- 
sional, fourth councilor and twelfth senatorial districts. Pop- 
ulation, 1,490. 

Winchester was granted in 1733 by the Massachusetts Col- 
ony to Josiah Willard and others, and was first called "Earling- 
ton." Later, for some cause yet undiscovered, the name was 
changed to "Arlington," which later was changed to "Win- 
chester," after an English city, from which some of the an- 
cestors of the grantees are said to have come. As originally 
granted, the township was of the contents of six miles square, 
and it was shaped like the block letter L, and "lay to the 
eastward and northward of Northfield." Its southeastern 
corner was established practically as it now is, while its 
northwestern corner was at the Connecticut river, where Brat- 
tleboro, Vt., now is, and at the present corner of Hinsdale and 
Chesterfield at this point. In 1744 "the New Province line" 
was established between Massachusetts and New Hampshire. 
This line severed from Winchester about two thousand acres, 
which later became a part of Warwick, Mass., and divided the 
township of Northfield nearly in the middle, leaving a portion 
in each province. In 1753 New Hampshire granted to Josiah 
Willard and his associates all that territory lying between 



70 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Winchester's east line and the Connecticut river, under the 
name of Winchester, with the proviso that the township so 
incorporated might be divided. This provision was promptly 
(in the same year) acted upon; and upon the petition of Col. 
Ebenezer Hinsdale and others the township of Hinsdale was 
set off. The southwesterly corner of Winchester was fixed 
at a point in the New Province line eighty rods eastwardly from 
the Connecticut river, and thence Winchester's westerly line 
ran due north, "by the needle," till it intersected the original 
east and west line on the north boundary. By this, Winches- 
ter received a large portion of the old Northfield grant on its 
southwest corner and lost a considerable area on its north- 
westerly border. This allotment of territory continued un- 
changed for ninety-seven years. In 1850 a small triangular 
corner was taken from the northwest corner of Richmond and 
annexed to Winchester. Cheshire county, second congres- 
sional, fourth councilor and eleventh senatorial districts. 
Population, 2,282. 

Windham was set off from Londonderry and incorporated 
in 1741 and named after an English town. The first grant 
of land in what is now Windham was one of five hundred 
acres made by the legislature of Massachusetts to Rev. 
Thomas Cobbett of Ipswich, Mass., in 1662. The exact lo- 
cation is not known, but it was on the shore of what is now 
Cobbett's Pond. The first settlement was made about 1720. 
John Waddell occupied the first house. David Gregg and 
Alexander McCoy settled the following year. The line be- 
tween Windham and Salem was established in 1752, part of 
Windham being annexed to Salem. Part of Londonderry was 
annexed in 1777 and another part the following year. The 
line between Londonderry and Windham was established in 
1782 and an additional part of Londonderry was annexed in 
1805. Rockingham county, first congressional, third coun- 
cilor and twenty-second senatorial districts. Population, 656. 

Windsor was formerly known as "Campbell's Gore," and in 
1797 "Wheeler's Gore" was annexed to it. The next year the 
town was incorporated and the name changed to Windsor 
after an English town. It is one of the smallest towns, both 
in area and population. Hillsborough county, second con- 
gressional, fourth councilor and ninth senatorial districts. 
Population, 24. 

Wolfeboro was granted in 1759 by the Masonian Proprie- 
tors to William E. Treadwell and others. This grant was taken 
from a large tract of land called "Kingswood" and named 
■"Wolfborough" in honor of General Wolfe, the hero of Que- 
bec. Nearly a century afterwards, by special act of congress, 
the spelling was changed to Wolfeboro. Four additions have 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 71 

since been made to the town on the sides now bounded by 
towns of Alton, Wakefield and Tuftonboro. Wolfeboro was 
incorporated in 1770. Not until 1768 were there any perma- 
nent inhabitants. Among the early settlers were Benjamin 
Blake, William Fullerton, Ruben Libby, Ebenezer Meader, 
Thomas Piper and Henry Rust. In 18 58 a small part of 
Tuftonboro was annexed. Wolfeboro was the summer 
home of John Wentworth, the last provincial governor, and 
he did much for this new settlement. The foundations of his 
commodious mansion still remain and are visited by tourists. 
Brewster Free academy, a preparatory school of recognized 
standing, is located in Wolfeboro. Carroll county, first con- 
gressional, first councilor and fourth senatorial districts. 
Population, 2,224. 

Woodstock was granted in 1763 to Eli Demerit and others 
and incorporated with the name "Peeling." It was regranted 
in 1771 to Nathaniel Cushman and others and the name 
changed to "Fairfield." In 1840 the name was changed to 
Woodstock. Grafton county, second congressional, first coun- 
cilor and third senatorial districts. Population, 1,083. 



UNINCORPORATED PLACES. 

In 1831 the legislature authorized the governor and coun- 
cil to appoint a land commissioner to sell the public lands, 
and James Willey of Conway was appointed to that office. 
The following is a list of all the grants that have been made. 

Bean's Grant was made by Commissioner Willey to Charles 
Bean of Maine in 1835 and it contained about 3,300 acres. 

Bean's Purchase was made by Commissioner Willey to Al- 
pheus Bean of Bartlett in 1832 for $1,023 and contained 
about 33,000 acres. 

Cambridge was granted in 1773 by King George the Third 
to Nathaniel Rogers and others and contained about 23,160 
acres. 

Chandler's Purchase was made by Commissioner Willey to 
Jeremiah Chandler of Conway in 1835 for $300 and contained 
about 10,000 acres. 

Crawford's Purchase was made by Commissioner Willey to 
Thomas Abbott, Nathaniel Abbott and Ethan A. Crawford in 
1834 for $8,000 and contained about 15,712 acres. 

Cutt's Grant was made by the legislature to Thomas Cutts 
Df Maine in 1810. 



72 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Dixville was granted by the legislature to Timothy Dix, Jr., 
in 1805 and contained about 29,340 acres and the price was 

$4,500. 

Dix's Grant was made by the legislature to Timothy Dix, 
Jr., in 1809. 

Erving's Grant was made by King George Third to William 
Erving of Boston, a captain in the French and Indian war, in 
1775 and contained about 3,468 acres. 

Green's Grant was made by King George Third to Francis 
Green of Boston, a lieutenant in the French and Indian war, 
in 1774 and contained about 2,032 acres. 

Gilmanton and Atkinson Academy Grant was made by the 
legislature to Gilmanton academy and Atkinson academy in 
equal shares in 1809 and contained about 13,000 acres. 

Hadley's Purchase was sold by Commissioner Willey to 
Henry G. Hadley of Eugene City, Oregon, in 1834 and con- 
tained about 8,371 acres. The price was $500. 

Kilkenny was granted by King George Third to Jonathan 
Warner and many others in 1774 and contained about 26,911 
acres. 

Low and Burbank's Grant was made by the legislature 
through State Treasurer Abner B. Kelly to Clovis Low of 
Jefferson and Barker Burbank of Shelburne in 1832. 

Martin's Location was granted by King George Third to 
Thomas Martin of Portsmouth, a conductor of artillery stores 
in the French and Indian war, in 1773 and contained about 
2,000 acres. 

Millsfield was granted by King George the Third to George 
Boyd and others in 1774 and was named in honor of Thomas 
Mills. It contained about 23,200 acres. 

Odell was sold by Commissioner Willey to Richard Odell 
of Conway in 1834 and contained about 23,751 acres. The 
price was $1,863. 

Pinkham's Grant was made by the legislature to Daniel 
Pinkham in 1835. 

Sargent's Purchase was sold by Commissioner Willey to 
Jacob Sargent of Thornton and others for $300. 

Second College Grant was made by the legislature to Dart- 
mouth college in 1807 and contained a tract six miles square. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 73 

Success was granted by King George Third in 1773 and con- 
tained about 30,472 acres. The grantees were Benjamin 
Mackay and about seventy others. 

Thompson and Meserve's Purchase was sold by Commis- 
sioner Willey to Samuel W. Thompson of Conway and George 
P. Meserve of Jackson in 1835 for $500 and contained about 
12,000 acres. 

Hale's Location was granted by King George Third to Sam- 
uel Hale of Portsmouth in 1771 and contained about 1,215 



NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE FLAG. 

The state flag was adopted in 1909 by act of the legislature 
(chapter 16, Laws of 1909). The body or field of the flag is 
blue and bears upon its center in suitable proportion and colors 
a representation of the state seal. The motto on the flag in- 
cludes the date 1784, when the government was established. 
The seal is surrounded by a wreath of laurel leaves with nine 
stars interspersed. 

The flag is displayed above the state house when the legisla- 
ture is in session and during meetings of the executive council 
and upon such other ocasions as the governor designates. 

THE STATE HOUSE. 

The seat of government is at the state house in Concord and 
has been for over 110 years although the present capitol build- 
ing is only 105 years old and has been twice remodelled. Twice 
have strenuous efforts been made to remove the capitol to Man- 
chester, the largest city in the State. 

During the Eevolutionary war the seat of government was at 
Exeter and all the sessions of the provincial congress or con- 
vention and the colonial house of representatives were held in 
that academic town. The first six sessions of the state legisla- 
ture assembled at Exeter also. In 1777 the legislature met at 
Portsmouth for a change and again in 1780, but all the other 
meetings took place at Exeter until 1782, when Concord became 
the capitol. From then until 1807 the legislature met at various 
places, including Concord, Exeter, Portsmouth, Hopkinton, 
Charlestown, Dover and Amherst. Concord sessions in those 
days and in the later period from 1807 to 1819 took place in the 
old town house that stood on the site of the Merrimack county 
building of today. 



74 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

The state house was built in 1816 to 1819 and cost $82,000. 
The lot of land, consisting of about two acres, was given by the 
town and the stone for the building was taken out of "Rattle- 
snake Hill" and dressed by convicts at the state prison. At the 
first legislature that sat in it there were twelve senators and 
one hundred and ninety-four representatives. 

During the Civil War the state house was too small to ac- 
commodate the legislature and officials. Manchester offered to 
build a new one to cost $500,000 and give it to the state for the 
honor of becoming the seat of government and one of the 
greatest and closest battles in the history of the legislature was 
fought over this proposition. Manchester was defeated and in- 
stead of moving, the state decided to enlarge and remodel the 
old building, which was done in 1864-66. 

The building was remodelled after the architecture of the 
Hotel Des Invalides in Paris and from that day to this it has 
been regarded as one of the most meritorious structures from 
an architectural viewpoint that there is in the country. The 
government outgrew the building again in 1909 so that an addi- 
tion was built on, which placed the state house in its present 
form. Before the addition was made Manchester made its 
second attempt to become the capitol by offering $1,000,000 to 
build a new building. The struggle between the two cities was 
fought all over again with the same result, that Concord won. 

The cost of the first remodelling of the building was about 
$200,000, and of the second, $400,000. It is not probable that 
further changes in the building will be made for many years, 
the accommodations now being ample for legislature and of- 
ficials. 

One of the interesting attractions in the state house is the 
gallery of portraits in the principal offices and corridors. These 
portraits are of famous sons of the state, including the heroes 
of civil and military life, former governors, senators, secretaries 
of state and others. 

STATISTICAL SECTION. 

The following tables give the state's population by cities and 
towns as shown by the state census in 1775 and the United States 
censuses 1790-1910, and the number of representatives of each 
town returned to the general court in 1784, and at each decen- 
nial period, 1791-1911. This table includes only existing towns. 
Each town is entered under the county to which it now belongs. 
If at the date of any census it belonged to another county this 
fact is indicated in the population column. 

In the representative column * stands for classed town and f 
for a town sending a representative "a proportionate part of 
the time." A blank in this column signifies that in the given 
year the town failed to return a representative. 

The population and political statistics of New Hampshire 
are presented in tables made up for census and legislative rec- 
ords. Page 76 illustrates the growth of the larger communi- 
ties, page 77 the growth by counties. 



76 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



GROWTH OF CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Population of Places of Over 2,500 at Last Three Censuses. 



Cities. 

Berlin 

Concord 

Dover 

Franklin 

Keene 

Laconia . 

Manchester 

Nashua 

Portsmouth . 
Rochester . . 
Somersworth 
Towns. 
Claremont . . 

Conway 

Derry 

Exeter 

Farmington . 
Goffstown . . 
Haverhill . . . 
Lancaster . . 
Lebanon .... 

Littleton 

Milf ord 

Newmarket . 

Newport 

Pembroke . . . 
Walpole 



County 

Coos 

Merrimack . . . 

Strafford 

Merrimack ... 

Cheshire 

Belknap 

Hillsborough . 
Hillsborough . 
Rockingham .. 

Strafford 

Strafford 

Sullivan 

Carroll 

Rockingham . . 
Rockingham . . 

Strafford 

Hillsborough 

Grafton 

Coos 

Grafton 

Grafton 

Hillsborough . 
Rockingham . 

Sullivan 

Merrimack . . . 
Cheshire 



1910. 



1900. 



11,780 


8,886 


3,729 


21,497 


19,632 


17,004 


13,247 


13,207 


12,790 


6,132 


5,846 


4,085 


10,068 


9,165 


7,446 


10,183 


8,042 


6,143 


70,063 


56,987 


44,126 


26,005 


23,898 


19,311 


11,269 


10,637 


9,827 


8,868 


8,466 


7,396 


6,704 


7,023 


6,207 


7,529 


6,498 


5,565 


3,413 


3,154 


2,331 


5,123 


3,583 


2,604 


4,897 


4,922 


4,284 


2,621 


2,265 


3,064 


2,579 


2,528 


1,981 


3,498 


3,414 


2,545 


3,054 


3,190 


3,373 


5,718 


4,965 


3,763 


4,069 


4,066 


3,365 


3,939 


3,739 


3,014 


3.348 


2,892 


2,742 


3,705 


3,126 


2,628 


3,062 


3,183 


3,172 


2,668 


2,693 


2,163 



1890. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



77 



POPULATION STATISTICS. 

Figures for each county and state as a whole at each census. 



Counties. 



The State . 

Belknap 

Carroll 

Cheshire 

Coos 

Grafton 

Hillsborough 
Merrimack . 
Rockingham 
Strafford — 
Sullivan 



1910. 



430,572 
21,309 
16,316 
30,659 
30,753 
41,652 

126,072 
53,335 
52,188 
38,951 
19,337 



1900. 


1890. 


1880. 


1870. 


411,588 


376,530 


346,991 


318,300 


19,526 


20,321 


17,948 


17,681 


16,895 


18,124 


18,224 


17,332 


31,321 


29,579 


28,734 


27,265 


29,468 


23,211 


18,580 


14,932 


40,844 


37,217 


38,788 


39,103 


112,640 


93,247 


75,684 


64,238 


52,430 


49,435 


46,300 


42,151 


51,118 


49,650 


49,064 


47,297 


39,337 


38,442 


35,558 


30,243 


18,009 


17,304 


18,161 


18,058 



1860. 

326,073 
18,549 
20,465 
27,43* 
13,161 
42,260 
62,140 
41,408 
50,122 
31,493 
19,041 



Counties. 


1850. 


1840. 


1830. 1820. 


1810. 


1800. 


1790. 




317,976 
17,721 
20,157 

. 30,144 
11,853 
42,343 
57,478 
40,337 
49,194 
29,374 
19,375 


284,574 

26,429 
9,849 
42,311 
42,494 
36,253 
45,771 
61,127 
20,340 


269,328 244.161 


214,460 

40,988 

3,991 

28,462 

49,249 

50,175 
41,595 


183,858 

38,825 

23,093 
43,899 

45,427 
32,614 


141,885 




27,016 
8,388 
38,682 
37,724 
34,614 
44,325 
58 910 


45,376 
5,549 

32,989 
53,884 

55,246 

51 117 










28,772 








13 472 


Hillsborough 

Merrimack 

Rockingham 


32,871 

43,169 
23,601 




19 669 











78 



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CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE, 

1916. 

PART FIRST. 

BILL OF RIGHTS. 

Article 1. All men are born equally free and independent; 
therefore all government of right originates from the people, is 
founded in consent, and instituted for the general good. 

Art. 2. All men have certain natural, essential, and inherent 
rights, among which are the enjoying and defending life and 
liberty, acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and, in a 
word, of seeking and obtaining happiness. 

Art. 3. When men enter into a state of society they sur- 
render up some of their natural rights to that society in order 
to insure the protection of others ; and, without such an 
equivalent, the surrender is void. 

Art. 4. Among the natural rights, some are in their very 
nature unalienable, because no equivalent can be given or re- 
ceived for them. Of this kind are the rights of conscience. 

Art. 5. Every individual has a natural and unalienable right 
to worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience 
and reason ; and no subject shall be hurt, molested or restrained, 
in his person, liberty or estate, for worshiping God in the 
manner and season most agreeable to the dictates of his own 
conscience, or for his religious profession, sentiments or per- 
suasion, provided he doth not disturb the public peace or disturb 
others in their religious worship. 

Art. 6. As morality and piety, rightly grounded on evangel- 
ical principles, will give the best and greatest security to gov- 
ernment, and will lay in the hearts of men the strongest obliga- 
tions to due subjection, and as the knowledge of these is most 
likely to be propagated through a society by the institution of 
the public worship of the Deity and of public instruction in 
morality and religion, therefore, to promote these important 
purposes, the people of this state have a right to empower, and 
do hereby fully empower, the legislature to authorize, from 
time to time, the several towns, parishes, bodies corporate, or 
religious societies within this state to make adequate provision, 
at their own expense, for the support and maintenance of pub- 
lic Protestant teachers of piety, religion, and morality. Pro- 
vided, notwithstanding, that the several towns, parishes, bodies 
corporate or religious societies shall at all times have the exclu- 

106 



NEW HAMPSHIKE MANUAL. 107 

sive right of electing- their own public teachers, and of con- 
tracting with them for their support and maintenance. And no 
person of any one particular religious sect or denomination shall 
ever be compelled to pay towards the support of the teacher or 
teachers of another persuasion, sect or denomination. And 
every denomination of Christians, demeaning themselves quietly 
and as good subjects of the state, shall be equally under the 
protection of the law; and no subordination of any one sect 
or denomination to another shall ever be established by law. 
And nothing herein shall be understood to affect any former 
contracts made for the support of the ministry ; but all such 
contracts shall remain and be in the same state as if this consti- 
tution had not been made. 

Art. 7. The people of this state have the sole and exclusive 
right of governing themselves as a free, sovereign, and inde- 
pendent state, and do, and forever hereafter shall, exercise and 
enjoy every power, jurisdiction, and right pertaining thereto 
which is not or may not hereafter be by them expressly dele- 
gated to the United States of America in congress assembled. 

Art, 8. All power residing originally in, and being derived 
from, the people, all the magistrates and officers of government 
are their substitutes and agents, and at all times accountable 
to them. 

Art. 9. No office or place whatsoever in government shall be 
hereditary, the abilities and integrity requisite in all not being 
transmissible to posterity or relations. 

Art. 10. Government being instituted for the common bene- 
fit, protection, and security of the whole community, and not 
for the private interest or emolument of any one man, family, 
or class of men, therefore, whenever the ends of government 
are perverted and public liberty manifestly endangered, and all 
other means of redress are ineffectual, the people may, and of 
right ought to, reform the old or establish a new government. 
The doctrine of non-resistance against arbitrary power and op- 
pression is absurd, slavish, and destructive of the good and 
happiness of mankind. 

Art. 11. All elections ought to be free; and every inhabitant 
of the state, having the proper qualifications, has equal right to 
elect and be elected into office ; but no person shall have the 
right to vote, or be eligible to office under the constitution of 
this state, who shall not be able to read the constitution in the 
English language, and to write, provided however, that this pro- 
vision shall not apply to any person prevented by a physical dis- 
ability from complying with its requisitions, nor to any person 
who now has the right to vote, nor to any person who shall be 
sixty years of age or upwards on the first day of January, A. D. 
1904, and provided further, that no person shall have the right 
to vote, or be eligible to office under the constitution of this 
state who shall have been convicted of treason, bribery, or any 



108 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



wilful violation of the election laws of this state or of the 
United States ; but the Supreme Court may, on notice to the 
attornej^-general restore the privileges of an elector to any per- 
son who may have forfeited them by conviction of such offenses. 

Art. 12. Every member of the community has a right to be 
protected by it in the enjoyment of his life, liberty and prop- 
erty. He is, therefore, bound to contribute his share in the ex- 
pense of such protection, and to yield his personal service, when 
necessary, or an equivalent. But no part of a man's property 
shall be taken from him or applied to public uses without his 
own consent or that of the representative body of the people. 
Nor are the inhabitants of this state controllable by any other 
laws than those to which they or their representative body have 
given their consent. 

Art. 13. No person who is conscientiously scrupulous about 
the lawfulness of bearing arms shall be compelled thereto, pro- 
vided he will pay an equivalent. 

Art. 14. Every subject of this state is entitled to a certain 
remedy, by having recourse to the laws, for all injuries he may 
receive in his person, property or character ; to obtain right and 
justice, freely, without being obliged to purchase it ; completely 
and without any denial; promptly, and without delay; con- 
formably to the laws. 

Art. 15. No subject shall be held to answer for any crime or 
offense until the same is fully and plainly, substantially and 
formally, described to him, or be compelled to accuse or furnish 
evidence against himself. And every subject shall have a right 
to produce all proofs that may be favorable to himself, to meet 
the witnesses against him face to face, and to be fully heard in 
his defense by himself and counsel. And no subject shall be 
arrested, imprisoned, despoiled, or deprived of his property, im- 
munities, or privileges, put out of the protection of the law, 
exiled or deprived of his life, liberty, or estate, but by the judg- 
ment of his peers or the law of the land. 

Art. 16. No subject shall be liable to be tried, after an ac- 
quittal, for the same crime or offense ; nor shall the legislature 
make any law that shall subject any person to a capital punish- 
ment (excepting for the government of the army and navy, and 
the militia in actual service) without trial by jury. 

Art. 17. In criminal prosecutions, the trial of facts in the 
vicinity where they happen is so essential to the security of the 
life, liberty, and estate of the citizen, that no crime or offense 
ought to be tried in any other county than that in which it is 
committed, except in cases of general insurrection in any par- 
ticular county, when it shall appear to the judges of the supe- 
rior court that an impartial trial cannot be had in the county 
where the offense may be committed, and, upon their report, 
the legislature shall think proper to direct the trial in the near- 
est county in which an impartial trial can be obtained. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 109 

Art. 18. All penalties ought to be proportioned to the nature 
of the offense. No wise legislature will affix the same punish- 
ment to the crimes of theft, forgery, and the like, which they 
do to those of murder and treason. Where the same undistin- 
guishing severity is exerted against all offenses, the people are 
led to forget the real distinction in the crimes themselves and 
to commit the most flagrant with as little compunction as they 
do the lightest offenses. For the same reason, a multitude of 
sanguinary laws is both impolitic and unjust, the true design of 
all punishments being to reform, not to exterminate, mankind. 

Art. 19. Every subject hath a right to be secure from all un- 
reasonable searches and seizures of his person, his houses, his 
papers, and all his possessions. Therefore, all warrants to 
search suspected places or arrest a person for examination or 
trial, in prosecutions for criminal matters, are contrary to this 
right, if the cause or foundation of them be not previously sup- 
ported by oath or affirmation, and if the order, in a warrant to 
a civil officer, to make search in suspected places or to arrest 
one or more suspected persons or to seize their property, be 
not accompanied with a special designation of the person or 
object of search, arrest, or seizure ; and no warrant ought to 
be issued but in cases and with the formalities prescribed by law. 

Art. 20. In all controversies concerning property and in all 
suits between two or more persons, except in cases in which it 
has been heretofore otherwise used and practiced, and except 
in cases in which the value in controversy does not exceed one 
hundred dollars and title of real estate is not concerned, the 
parties have a right to trial by jury ; and this method of pro- 
cedure shall be held sacred, unless, in cases arising on the high 
seas and such as relate to mariners' wages, the legislature shall 
think it neecssary hereafter to alter it. 

Art. 21. In order to reap the fullest advantage of the ines- 
timable privilege of trial by jury, great care ought to be taken 
that none but qualified persons should be appointed to serve ; 
and such ought to be fully compensated for their travel, time, 
and attendance. 

Art. 22. The liberty of the press is essential to the security 
of freedom in a state ; it ought, therefore, to be inviolably pre- 
served. 

Art. 23. Eetrospective laws are highly injurious, oppressive, 
and unjust. No such laws, therefore, should be made, either 
for the decision of civil causes or the punishment of offenses. 

Art. 24. A well-regulated militia is the proper, natural, and 
sure defense of a state. 

Art. 25. Standing armies are dangerous to liberty, and ought 
not to be raised or kept up without the consent of the legis- 
lature. 

Art. 26. In all cases and at all times, the military ought to 



110 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

be under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil 
power. 

Art. 27. No soldier, in time of peace, shall be quartered in 
any house without the consent of the owner ; and, in time of 
war, such quarters ought not to be made but by the civil mag- 
istrate, in a manner ordained by the legislature. 

Art. 28. No subsidy, charge, tax, impost, or duty shall be es- 
tablished, fixed, laid, or levied, under any pretext whatsoever, 
without the consent of the people or their representatives in the 
legislature, or authority derived from that body. 

Art. 29. The power of suspending the laws or the execution 
of them ought never to be exercised but by the legislature, or 
by authority derived therefrom, to be exercised in such par- 
ticular cases only as the legislature shall expressly provide for. 

Art. 30. The freedom of deliberation, speech, and debate in 
either house of the legislature is so essential to the rights of 
the people, that it cannot be the foundation of any action, com- 
plaint, or prosecution in any other court or place whatsoever. 

Art. 31. The legislature shall assemble for the redress of 
public grievances and for making such laws as the public good 
may require. 

Art. 32. The people have a right, in an orderly and peace- 
able manner, to assemble and consult upon the common good, 
give instructions to their representatives, and to request of the 
legislative body, by way of petition or remonstrance, redress 
of the wrongs done them, and of the grievances they suffer. 

Art. 33. No magistrate or court of law shall demand exces- 
sive bail or sureties, impose excessive fines or inflict cruel or 
unusual punishments. 

Art. 34. No person can in any case be subjected to law mar- 
tial or to any pains or penalties by virtue of that law, except 
those employed in the army or navy, and except the militia in 
actual service, but by authority of the legislature. 

Art. 35. It is essential to the preservation of the rights of 
every individual, his life, liberty, property, and character, that 
there be an impartial interpretation of the laws and adminis- 
tration of justice. It is the right of every citizen to be tried by 
judges as impartial as the lot of humanity will admit. It is, 
therefore, not only the best policy, but for the security of the 
rights of the people, that the judges of the supreme judicial 
court should hold their offices so long as they behave well, sub- 
ject, however, to such limitations on account of age as may be 
provided by the constitution of the state ; and that they should 
have honorable salaries, ascertained and established by standing 
laws. 

Art. 36. Economy being a most essential virtue in all states, 
especially in a young one, no pension should be granted but in 
consideration of actual services ; and such pensions ought to 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. Ill 

be granted with great caution by the legislature, and never for 
more than one year at a time. 

Art. 37. In the government of this state, the three essential 
powers thereof — to wit, the legislative, executive, and judicial — 
ought to be kept as separate from, and independent of, each 
other as the nature of a free government will admit or as is 
consistent with that chain of connection that binds the whole 
fabric of the constitution in one indissoluble bond of union and 
amity. 

Aet. 38. A frequent recurrence to the fundamental principles 
of the constitution and a constant adherence to justice, moder- 
ation, temperance, industry, frugality, and all the social virtues, 
are indispensably necessary to preserve the blessings of liberty 
and good government. The people ought, therefore, to have a 
particular regard to all those principles in the choice of their 
officers and representatives ; and they have a right to require of 
their lawgivers and magistrates an exact and constant observ- 
ance of them in the formation and execution of the laws 
necessary for the good administration of government. 

PART SECOND. 

FORM OF GOVERNMENT. 

Article 1. The people inhabiting the territory formerly 
called The Province of New Hampshire do hereby solemnly and 
mutually agree with each other to form themselves into a free, 
sovereign, and independent body politic, or state, by the name 
of The State of New Hampshire. 

GENERAL COURT. 

Art. 2. The supreme legislative power within this state shall 
be vested in the senate and house of representatives, each of 
which shall have a negative on the other. 

Art. 3. The senate and house shall assemble biennially, on 
the first Wednesday of January and at such other times as they 
may judge necessary, and shall dissolve and be dissolved seven 
days next preceding the said first Wednesday of January bien- 
nially, and shall be styled The General Court of New Hamp- 
shire. 

Art. 4. The general court shall forever have full power and 
authority to erect and constitute judicatories and courts of 
record or other courts, to be holden in the name of the state, 
for the hearing, trying, and determining all manner of crimes, 
offenses, pleas, processes, plaints, actions, causes, matters, and 
things whatsoever, arising or happening within this state, or 
between or concerning persons inhabiting, or residing, or 



112 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



brought within the same, or whether the same be criminal or 
civil, or whether the crimes be capital or not capital, and 
whether the said pleas be real, personal, or mixed, and for the 
awarding and issuing execution thereon ; to which courts and 
judicatories are hereby given and granted full power and au- 
thority, from time to time, to administer oaths or affirmations 
for the better discovery of truth in any matter in controversy 
or depending before them. 

AliT. 5. And, further, full power and authority are hereby 
given and granted to the said general court, from time to time 
to make, ordain, and establish all manner of wholesome and 
reasonable orders, laws, statutes, ordinances, directions, and in- 
structions, either with penalties or without, so as the same be 
not repugnant or contrary to this constitution, as they may 
judge for the benefit and welfare of this state and for the 
governing and ordering thereof and of the subjects of the same, 
for the necessary support and defense of the government there- 
of ; and to name and settle biennially, or provide by fixed laws 
for the naming and settling all civil officers within this state, 
such officers excepted the election and appointment of whom are 
hereafter in this form of government otherwise provided for; 
and to set forth the several duties, powers, and limits of the 
several civil and military officers of this state, and the forms 
of such oaths or affirmations as shall be respectively admin- 
istered unto them for the execution of their several offices and 
places, so as the same be not repugnant or contrary to this 
constitution ; and, also, to impose fines, mulcts, imprisonments, 
and other punishments ; and to impose and levy proportional and 
reasonable assessments, rates, and taxes upon all the inhab- 
itants of, and residents within, the said state, and upon all es- 
tates within the same, to be issued and disposed of by warrant, 
under the hand of the governor of this state for the time being, 
with the advice and consent of the council, for the public serv- 
ice, in the necessary defense and support of the government of 
this state and the protection and preservation of the subjects 
thereof, according to such acts as are or shall be in force within 
the same. Provided, that the general court shall not authorize 
any town to loan or give its money or credit, directly or indi- 
rectly, for the benefit of any corporation having for its object 
a dividend of profits, or in any way aid the same by taking its 
stock or bonds. 

Art. 6. The public charges of government or any part there- 
of may be raised by taxation upon polls, estates, and other 
classes of property, including franchises and property when 
passing by will or inheritance ; and there shall be a valuation of 
the estates within the state taken anew once in every five years, 
at least, and as much oftener as the general court shall order. 

Art. 7. No member of the general court shall take fees, be 
of counsel or act as advocate in any cause before either branch 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 113 

of the legislature ; and, upon due proof thereof, such member 
shall forfeit his seat in the legislature. 

Art. 8. The doors of the galleries of each house of the legis- 
lature shall be kept open to all persons who behave decently, 
except when the welfare of the state, in the opinion of either 
branch, shall require secrecy. 

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

Art. 9. There shall be, in the legislature of this state, a rep- 
resentation of the people, biennially elected, and founded upon 
principles of equality, and, in order that such representation 
may be as equal as circumstances will admit, every town, or 
place entitled to town privileges, and wards of cities having six 
hundred inhabitants by the last general census of the state, 
taken by authority of the United States, or of this state, may 
elect one representative ; if eighteen hundred such inhabitants, 
may elect two representatives ; and so proceeding in that pro- 
portion, making twelve hundred such inhabitants the mean in- 
creasing number for any additional representative : provided, 
that no town shall be divided or the boundaries of the wards of 
any city so altered as to increase the number of representatives 
to which such town or city may be entitled by the next preceding 
census ; and provided, further, that, to those towns and cities 
which since the last census have been divided or had their boun- 
daries or ward lines changed, the general court, in session next 
before these amendments shall take effect, shall equitably ap- 
portion representation in such manner that the number shall 
not be greater than it would have been had no such division or 
alteration been made. 

Art. 10. Whenever any town, place, or city ward shall have 
less than six hundred such inhabitants, the general court shall 
authorize such town, place or ward to elect and send to the 
general court a representative such proportionate part of the 
time as the number of its inhabitants shall bear to six hundred ; 
but the general court shall not authorize any such town, place 
or ward to elect and send such representative, except as herein 
provided. 

Art. 11. The members of the house of representatives shall 
be chosen biennially, in the month of November, and shall be 
the second branch of the legislature. 

Art. 12. All persons qualified to vote in the election of sen- 
ators shall be entitled to vote, within the district where they 
dwell, in the choice of representatives. 

Art. 13. Every member of the house of representatives shall 
be chosen by ballot, and, for two years, at least, next preceding 
his election, shall have been an inhabitant of this state; shall 
be, at the time of his election, an inhabitant of the town, parish, 
or place he may be chosen to represent ; and shall cease to rep- 



114 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

resent such town, parish, or place immediately on his ceasing 
to be qualified as aforesaid. 

Aet. 14. The presiding- officers of both houses of the legisla- 
ture shall severally receive out of the state treasury as compen- 
sation in full for their services, for the term elected, the sum 
of two hundred and fifty dollars, and all other members thereof 
seasonably attending and not departing without license, the 
sum of two hundred dollars, exclusive of mileage : provided, 
however, that when a special session shall be called by the gov- 
ernor, such officers and members shall receive for attendance an 
additional compensation of three dollars per day for a period 
not exceeding fifteen days, and the usual mileage. 

Art. 15. All intermediate vacancies in the house of represen- 
tatives may be filled up from time to time in the same manner 
as biennial elections are made. 

Art. 16. The house of representatives shall be the grand in- 
quest of the state, and all impeachments made by them shall be 
heard and tried by the senate. 

Art. 17. All money bills shall originate in the house of repre- 
sentatives, but the senate may propose or concur with amend- 
ments, as on other bills. 

Art. 18. The house of representatives shall have power to ad- 
journ themselves, but no longer than two days at a time. 

Art. 19. A majority of the members of the house of repre- 
sentatives shall be a quorum for doing business, but, when less 
than two thirds of the representatives elected shall be present, 
the assent of two thirds of those members shall be necessary to 
render their acts and proceedings valid. 

Art. 20. No member of the house of representatives or senate 
shall be arrested or held to bail on mesne process during his 
going to, returning from, or attendance upon, the court. 

Art. 21. The house of representatives shall choose their own 
speaker, appoint their own officers, and settle the rules of pro- 
ceedings in their own house, and shall be judge of the returns, 
elections, and qualifications of its members, as pointed out in 
this constitution. They shall have authority to punish by im- 
prisonment every person who shall be guilty of disrespect to 
the house, in its presence, by any disorderly and contemptuous 
behavior, or by threatening or ill treating any of its members, 
or by obstructing its deliberations ; every person guilty of a 
breach of its privileges in making arrests for debt, or by 
assaulting any member during his attendance at any session ; 
in assaulting or disturbing any one of its officers in the execu- 
tion of any order or procedure of the house ; in assaulting any 
witness or other person ordered to attend by, and during his 
attendance of, the house, or in rescuing any person arrested by 
order of the house, knowing them to be such. 

Art. 22. The senate, governor, and council shall have the 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 115 

iame powers in like cases, provided, that no imprisonment by 
:ither for any offense exceed ten days. 

Art. 23. The journals of the proceedings and all public acts 
)f both houses of the legislature shall be printed and published 
mmediately after every adjournment or prorogation, and, upon 
notion made by any one member, the yeas and nays upon any 
mestion shall be entered on the journal, and any- member of the 
;enate or house of representatives shall have a right, on motion 
nade at the time for that purpose, to have his protest or dis- 
sent, with the reasons, against any vote, resolve, or bill passed, 
mtered on the journal. 

SENATE. 

Art. 24. The senate shall consist of twenty-four members, 
who shall hold their office for two years from the first Wednes- 
lay of January next ensuing their election. 

Art. 25. And, that the state may be equally represented in 
the senate, the legislature shall, from time to time, divide the 
state into twenty-four districts, as nearly equal as may be with- 
out dividing towns and unincorporated places ; and, in making 
this division, they shall govern themselves by the proportion of 
iirect taxes paid by the said districts, and timely make known 
to the inhabitants of the state the limits of each district. 

Art. 26. The free holders and other inhabitants of each dis- 
trict qualified as in this constitution is provided, shall, bien- 
nially give in their votes for a senator at some meeting holden 
in the month of November. 

Art. 27. The senate shall be the first branch of the legisla- 
ture, and the senators shall be chosen in the following manner, 
viz. : every male inhabitant of each town, and parish with town 
privileges, and places unincorporated, in this state, of twenty- 
one years of age and upward, excepting paupers and persons 
excused from paying taxes at their own request, shall have a 
right, at the biennial or other meetings of the inhabitants of 
said towns and parishes, to be duly warned and holden bienni- 
ally, forever, in the month of November, to vote, in the town or 
parish wherein he dwells, for the senator in the district whereof 
he is a member. 

Art. 28. Provided, nevertheless, that no person shall be capa- 
ble of being elected a senator who is not of the age of thirty 
years, and who shall not have been an inhabitant of this state 
for seven years immediately preceding his election ; and, at the 
time thereof, he shall be an inhabitant of the district for which 
he shall be chosen. 

Art. 29. And every person qualified as the constitution pro- 
vides shall be considered an inhabitant, for the purpose of elect- 
ing and being elected into any office or place within this state, 
in the town, parish, and plantation where he dwelleth and hath 
his home. 



116 IEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Art. 30. And the inhabitants of plantations and places unin- 
corporated, qualified as this t constitution provides, who are or 
shall be required to assess taxes upon themselves towards the 
support of government, or shall be taxed therefor, shall have the 
same privilege of voting for senators, in the plantations and 
places wherein they reside, as the inhabitants of the respective 
towns and parishes aforesaid have. And the meetings of such 
plantations and places, for that purpose, shall be holden bien- 
nially in the month of November, at such places respectively 
therein as the assessors thereof shall direct; which assessors 
shall have like authority for notifying the electors, collecting 
and returning the votes, as the selectmen and town clerks have 
in their several towns by this constitution. 

Aet. 31. The meetings for the choice of governor, council, 
and senators shall be warned by warrant from the selectmen, 
and governed by a moderator, who shall, in the presence of the 
selectmen (whose duty it shall be to attend), in open meeting, 
receive the votes of all the inhabitants of such towns and par- 
ishes present and qualified to vote for senators ; and shall, in 
said meetings, in presence of the said selectmen and of the town 
clerk in said meetings, sort and count the said votes, and make 
a public declaration thereof, with the name of every person 
voted for and the number of votes for each person ; and the 
town clerk shall make a fair record of the same, at large, in the 
town book, and shall make out a fair attested copy thereof, to 
be by him sealed up and directed to the secretary of the state, 
with a superscription expressing the purport thereof; and the 
said town clerk shall cause such attested copy to be delivered 
to the sheriff of the county in which said town or parish shall 
lie thirty days, at least, before the first Wednesday of January, 
or to the secretary of the state at least twenty days before the 
said first Wednesday of January ; and the sheriff of each county 
or his deputy shall deliver all such certificates by him received 
into the secretary's office at least twenty days before the first 
Wednesday of January. 

Art. 32. And, that there may be a due meeting of senators 
on the first Wednesday of January, biennially, the governor and 
a majority of the council for the time being shall, as soon as 
may be, examine the returned copies of such records, and, four- 
teen days before the first Wednesday of January, he shall issue 
his summons to such persons as appear to be chosen senators 
by a plurality of votes to attend and take their seats on that 
day: provided, nevertheless, that, for the first year, the said re- 
turned copies shall be examined by the president and a majority 
of the council then in office; and the said president shall, in 
like manner, notify the persons elected to attend and take their 
seats accordingly. 

Art. 33. And in case there shall not appear to be a senator 
elected by a plurality of votes for any district, the deficiency 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 117 

all be supplied in the following- manner, viz. : the members of 
e house of representatives and such senators as shall be de- 
ired elected shall take the names of the two persons having 
e highest number of votes in the district, and out of them 
all elect, by joint ballot, the senator wanted for such district; 
d, in this manner, all such vacancies shall be filled up in every 
strict of the state ; all vacancies in the senate arising by death, 
moval out of the state, or otherwise, except from failure to 
;ct, shall be filled by a new election by the people of the dis- 
ict, upon the requisition of the governor, as soon as may be 
ter such vacancies shall happen. 

Art. 34. The senate shall be final judges of the elections, 
turns and qualifications of their own members, as pointed out 
this constitution. 

Art. 35. The senate shall have power to adjourn themselves, 
ovided such adjournment do not exceed two days at a time ; 
ovided, nevertheless, that, whenever they shall sit on the trial 
any impeachment, they may adjourn to such time and place 
they may think proper, although the legislature be not 
isembled on such day or at such pla^e. 

JArt. 36. The senate shall appoint their president and other 

icers, and determine their own rules of proceedings. And not 

than thirteen members of the senate shall make a quorum 

doing business ; and, when less than sixteen senators shall 

present, the assent of ten, at least, shall be necessary to 

nder their acts and proceedings valid. 

Art. 37. The senate shall be a court, with full power and 

thority to hear, try and determine all impeachments made by 

house of representatives against any officer or officers of the 

ite, for bribery, corruption, malpractice or maladministration 

office, with full power to issue summons or compulsory 

ocess for convening witnesses before them ; but, previous to 

trial of any such impeachment, the members of the senate 

ill respectively be sworn truly and impartially to try and 

bermine the charge in question according to evidence. And 

ry officer impeached for bribery, corruption, malpractice or 

ladministration in office shall be served with an attested 

3y of the impeachment and order of senate thereon, with 

h citation as the senate may direct, setting forth the time 

place of their sitting to try the impeachment; which 

vice shall be made by the sheriff or such other sworn officer 

the senate may appoint, at least fourteen days previous to 

time of trial ; and, such citation being duly served and re- 

ned, the senate may proceed in the hearing of the impeach- 

nt, giving the person impeached, if he shall appear, full 

rty of producing witnesses and proofs and of making his 

'ense by himself and counsel ; and may also, upon his refusing 

neglecting to appear, hear the proofs in support of the 

eachment, and render judgment thereon, his non-appearance 



118 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

notwithstanding-; and such judgment shall have the same force 
and effect as if the person impeached had appeared and pleaded 
in the trial. 

Art. 38. Their judgment, however, shall not extend further 
than removal from office, disqualification to hold or enjoy any 
place of honor, trust or profit under this state; but the party 
so convicted shall, nevertheless, be liable to indictment, trial, 
judgment and punishment, according to the laws of the land. 

Art. 39. Whenever the governor shall be impeached, the chief 
justice of the supreme judicial court shall, during the trial, 
preside in the senate, but have no vote therein. 

EXECUTIVE POWER. GOVERNOR. 

Art. 40. There shall be a supreme executive magistrate, who 
shall be styled Governor of the State of New Hampshire, and 
whose title shall be His Excellency. 

Art. 41. The governor shall be chosen biennially, in the 
month of November, and the votes for governor shall be re- 
ceived, sorted, counted, certified and returned in the same man- 
ner as the votes for senators ; and the secretary shall lay the 
same before the senate and house of representatives on the 
first Wednesday of January, to be by them examined ; and, in 
case of an election by a plurality of votes through the state, 
the choice shall be by them declared and published ; and the 
qualifications of electors of the governor shall be the same as 
those for senators ; and, if no person shall have a plurality of 
votes, the senate and house of representatives shall, by a joint 
ballot, elect one of the two persons having the highest number 
of votes, who shall be declared governor. And no person shall 
be eligible to this office unless, at the time of his election, he 
shall have been an inhabitant of this state for seven years next 
preceding, and unless he shall be of the age of thirty years. 

Art. 42. In cases of disagreement between the two houses 
with regard to the time or place of adjournment or proroga- 
tion, the governor, with advice of council, shall have the right 
to adjourn or prorogue the general court, not exceeding ninety 
days at any one time, as he may determine the public good may 
require ; and he shall dissolve the same seven days before the 
said first Wednesday of January. And, in case of any infectious 
distemper prevailing in the place where the said court at any 
time is to convene, or any other cause whereby dangers may 
arise to the health or lives of the members from their attend- 
ance the governor may direct the session to be holden at some 
other, the most convenient, place within the state. 

Art. 43. Every bill which shall have passed both houses of 
the general court shall, before it becomes a law, be presented to 
the governor ; if he approve, he shall sign it, but if not, he shall 
return it, with his objections, to that house in which it shall 



NEW HAMPSHIKE MANUAL. 119 



e originated, who shall enter the objections at large on 
r journal and proceed to reconsider it. If, after such re- 
?ideration, two thirds of that house shall agree to pass the 
it shall be sent, together with such objections, to the other 
se, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered ; and, if ap- 
?ed by two thirds of that house, it shall become a law. But, 
ill such cases, the votes of both houses shall be determined 
yeas and nays, and the names of the persons voting for or 
inst the bill shall be entered on the journal of each house 
actively. If any bill shall not be returned by the governor 
lin five days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been 
>ented to him, the same shall be a law in like manner as if 
bad signed it, unless the legislature, by their adjournment, 
fent its return, in which case it shall not be a law. 
rt. 44. Every resolve shall be presented to the governor, 
, before the same shall take effect, shall be approved by him, 
being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by the senate 
house of representatives, according to the rules and limita- 
s prescribed in the case of a bill. 

RT. 45. All judicial officers, the attorney-general, coroners, 
all officers of the navy and general and field officers of the 
tia, shall be nominated and appointed by the governor and 
icil ; and every such nomination shall be made at least three 
5 prior to such appointment ; and no appointment shall take 
e unless a majority of the council agree thereto. 
it. 46. The governor and council shall have a negative on 
other, both in the nominations and appointments. Every 
ination and appointment shall be signed by the governor 
council, and every negative shall be also signed by the gov- 

or council who made the same. 
t. 47. The captains and subalterns in the respective regi- 
s shall be nominated and recommended by the field officers 
le governor, who is to issue their commissions immediately 
eceipt of such recommendation ; provided, that no person 
be so nominated and recommended until he shall have been 
lined and found duly qualified by an examining board ap- 
ed by the governor. 

. 48. Whenever the chair of the governor shall become 

t, by reason of his death, absence from the state, or other- 

the president of the senate shall, during such vacancy, 

and exercise all the powers and authorities, which, by this 

itution, the governor is vested with when personally pres- 

but, when the president of the senate shall exercise the 

of governor, he shall not hold his office in the senate. 

ever the chair both of the governor and of the president 

e senate shall become vacant, by reason of their death, 

ce from the state, or otherwise, the speaker of the house 

during such vacancies, have and exercise all the powers 

authorities which, by this constitution, the governor is 



120 NEW HAMPSHIRE' MANUAL. 

vested with when personally present ; but when the speaker of 
the house shall exercise the office of governor, he shall not 
hold his office in the house. 

Art. 49. The governor, with advice of council, shall have full 
power and authority, in recess of the general court, to prorogue 
the same from time to time, not exceeding ninety days in any 
one recess of said court ; and, during the sessions of said court, 
to adjourn or prorogue it to any time the two houses may de- 
sire ; and to call it together sooner than the time to which it 
may be adjourned or prorogued, if the welfare of the state 
should require the same. 

Art. 50. The governor of this state, for the time being, shall 
be commander-in-chief of the army and navy and all the mili- 
tary forces of the state by sea and land ; and shall have full 
power, by himself or by any chief commander or other officer 
or officers, from time to time to train, instruct, exercise, and 
govern the militia and navy ; and for the special defense and 
safety of this state, to assemble in martial array and put in 
warlike posture the inhabitants thereof and to lead and con- 
duct them, and with them to encounter, repulse, repel, resist, 
and pursue by force of arms, as well by sea as by land, within 
and without the limits of this state ; and also to kill, slay, de- 
stroy, if necessary, and conquer, by all fitting ways, enterprise, 
and means all and every such person and persons as shall at 
any time hereafter, in a hostile manner, attempt or enterprise 
the destruction, invasion, detriment or annoyance of this state ; 
and to use and exercise over the army and navy and over the 
militia in actual service the law martial, in time of war, inva- 
sion, and also in rebellion declared by the legislature to exist, 
as occasion shall necessarily require ; and surprise, by all ways 
and means whatsoever, all and every such person or persons, 
with their ships, arms, ammunition, and other goods, as shall, 
in a hostile manner, invade, or attempt the invading, conquering, 
or annoying this state; and, in fine, the governor hereby is 
intrusted with all other powers incident to the office of captain- 
general and commander-in-chief and admiral, to be exercised 
agreeably to the rules and regulations of the constitution and 
laws of the land, provided, that the governor shall not at any 
time hereafter, by virtue of any power by this constitution 
granted, or hereafter to be granted to him by the legislature, 
transport any of the inhabitants of this state or oblige them to 
march out of the limits of the same without their free and vol- 
untary consent or the consent of the general court, nor grant 
commissions for exercising the law martial in any case without 
the advice and consent of the council. 

Art. 51. The power of pardoning offenses, except such as 
persons may be convicted of before the senate, by impeachment 
of the house, shall be in the governor, by and with the advice 
of council; but no charter of pardon, granted by the governor 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 121 

i advice of council, before conviction, shall avail the party 
-ding- the same, notwithstanding any general or particular 
ressions contained therein, descriptive of the offense or of- 
>es intended to be pardoned. 

rt. 52. No officer, duly commissioned to command in the 
tia, shall be removed from his office but by the address of 
i houses to the governor or by fair trial in court martial 
suant to the laws of the state for the time being. 
rt. 53. The commanding officers of the regiments shall ap- 
it their adjutants and quartermasters ; the brigadiers, their 
j-ade-majors ; the major-generals, their aids ; the captains and 
alterns, their non-commissioned officers. 

RT. 54. The division of the militia into brigades, regiments 

companies, made in pursuance of the militia laws now in 

^e, shall be considered as the proper division of the militia 

this state, until the same shall be altered by some future 

rt. 55. No moneys shall be issued out of the treasury of 
state and disposed of (except such sums as may be appro- 
ited for the redemption of bills of credit or treasurer's 
es or for the payment of interest arising thereon) but by 
•rant under the hand of the governor for the time being, by 
with the advice and consent of the council, for the neces- 

Y support and defense of this state and for the necessary 
tection and preservation of the inhabitants thereof, agree- 

Y to the acts and resolves of the general court. 

RT. 56. All public boards, the commissary-general, ail super- 

mding officers of public magazines and stores belonging to 

; state, and all commanding officers of forts and garrisons 

fiin the same shall, once in every three months, officially 

without requisition, and at other times when required by 

governor, deliver to him an account of all goods, stores, 

visions, ammunition, cannon with their appendages, and all 

ill arms with their accoutrements, and all other public prop- 

7 under their care respectively, distinguishing the quantity 

kind of each as particularly as may be, together with the 

dition of such forts and garrisons. And the commanding 

;er shall exhibit to the governor, when required by him, 

e and exact plans of such forts, and of the land and sea, or 

bor or harbors adjacent. 

RT. 57. The governor and council shall be compensated for 
lr services, from time to time, by such grants as the general 
rt shall think reasonable. 

ut. 58. Permanent and honorable salaries shall be estab- 
ed by law for the justices of the superior court. 



122 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



COUNCIL. 



Art. 59. There shall be biennially elected by ballot five coun- 
cilors, for advising the governor in the executive part of gov- 
ernment. The freeholders and other inhabitants in each county, 
qualified to vote for senators, shall, some time in the month of 
November, give in their votes for one councilor, which votes shall 
be received, sorted, counted, certified and returned to the secre- 
tary's office, in the same manner as the votes for senators, to 
be by the secretary laid before the senate and house of repre- 
sentatives on the first Wednesday of January. 

Art. 60. And the person having a plurality of votes in any 
county shall be considered as duly elected a councilor; but, if 
no person shall have a plurality of votes in any county, the 
senate and house of representatives shall take the names of the 
two persons who have the highest number of votes in each 
county and not elected, and out of those two shall elect, by 
joint ballot, the councilor wanted for the county ; and the 
qualifications for councilors shall be the same as for senator. 

Art. 61. If any person thus chosen a councilor shall be 
elected governor or member of either branch of the legislature 
and shall accept the trust, or if any person elected a councilor 
shall refuse to accept the office, or in case of the death, resigna- 
tion or removal of any councilor out of the state, the governor 
may issue a precept for the election of a new councilor in that 
county where such vacancy shall happen; and the choice shall 
be in the same manner as before directed ; and the governor 
shall have full power and authority to convene the council, from 
time to time, at his discretion ; and with them, or the majority 
of them, may and shall, from time to time, hold a council for 
ordering and directing the affairs of the state, according to the 
laws of the land. 

Art. 62. The members of the council may be impeached by 
the house and tried by the senate for bribery, corruption, mal- 
practice or maladministration. 

Art. 63. The resolutions and advice of the council shall be 
recorded by the secretary in a register, and signed by all the 
members present agreeing thereto ; and this record may be 
called for at any time by either house of the legislature ; and 
any member of the council may enter his opinion contrary to 
the resolution of the majority, with the reasons for such 
opinion. 

Art. 64. The legislature may, if the public good shall here- 
after require it, divide the state into five districts, as nearly 
equal as may be, governing themselves by the number of popu- 
lation, each district to elect a councilor ; and, in case of such 
division, the manner of the choice shall be conformable to the 
present mode of election in counties. 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 123 

rt. 65. And, whereas the elections appointed to be made by 
j constitution on the first Wednesday of January, biennially, 
the two houses of the legislature, may not be completed on 
t day, the said elections may be adjourned from day to day 
il the same be completed. And the order of the elections 
11 be as follows : The vacancies in the senate, if any, shall be 
t filled up; the governor shall then be elected, provided there 
11 be no choice of him by the people ; and afterwards, the 
i houses shall proceed to fill up the vacancy, if any, in the 
ncil. 

SECRETARY, TREASURER, COMMISSARY-GENERAL, ETC. 

rt. 66. The secretary, treasurer and commissary-general 
11 be chosen by joint ballot of the senators and represent- 
ees, assembled in one room. 

l rt. 67. The records of the state shall be kept in the office 
the secretary ; and he shall attend the governor and council, 
senate and representatives, in person or by deputy, as they 
y require. 

lRT. 68. The secretary of the state shall at all times have a 
>uty, to be by him appointed, for whose conduct in office he 
11 be responsible ; and, in case of the death, removal or in- 
lity of the secretary, his deputy shall exercise all the duties 
the office of secretary of this state until another shall be 
>ointed. 

RT. 69. The secretary, before he enters upon the business 
lis office, shall give bond, with sufficient sureties, in a reason- 
sum, for the use of the state, for the punctual perform- 
of his trust. 

COUNTY TREASURERS, ETC. 

RT. 70. The county treasurers, registers of probate, solicit- 

sheriffs and registers of deeds shall be elected by the in- 

itants of the several towns in the several counties in the 

te, according to the method now practiced and the laws of 

state ; provided, nevertheless, the legislature shall have au- 

rity to alter the manner of certifying the votes and the 

le of electing those officers, but not so as to deprive the 

pie of the right they now have of electing them. 

rt. 71. And the legislature, on the application of the major 

t of the inhabitants of any county, shall have authority to 

de the same into two districts for registering deeds, if to 

m it shall appear necessary, each district to elect a register 

deeds ; and, before they enter upon the business of their 

es, shall be respectively sworn faithfully to discharge the 

ies thereof, and shall severally give bond, with sufficient 

sties, in a reasonable sum, for the use of the county, for 

punctual performance of their respective trusts. 



124 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



JUDICIARY POWER. 



Art. 72. The tenure that all commissioned officers shall have 
by law m their offices shall be expressed in their respective 
commissions. All judicial officers, duly appointed, commissioned 
and sworn, shall hold their offices during good behavior, except- 
ing those concerning whom there is a different provision made 
in this constitution; provided, nevertheless, the governor, with 
consent of council, may remove them upon the address of both 
houses of the legislature. 

Akt. 73. Each branch of the legislature, as well as the gov- 
ernor and council, shall have authority to require the opinions 
of the justices of the superior court upon important questions 
of law and upon solemn occasions. 

Art. 74. In order that the people may not suffer from the 
long continuance in place of any justice of the peace who shall 
fail in discharging the important duties of his office with ability 
and fidelity, all commissions of justices of the peace shall be- 
come void at the expiration of five years from their respective 
dates; and upon the expiration of any commission, the same 
may, if neccessary, be renewed, or another person appointed, as 
shall most conduce to the well-being of the state. 

Art. 75. All causes of marriage, divorce and alimony, and 
all appeals from the respective judges of probate, shall be heard 
and tried by the superior court, until the legislature shall by 
law make other provision. 

Art. 76. The general court are empowered to give to justices 
of the peace jurisdiction in civil causes, when the damages de- 
manded shall not exceed one hundred dollars and title of real 
estate is not concerned, but with the right of appeal to either 
party to some other court. And the general court are further 
empowered to give to police courts original jurisdiction to try 
and determine, subject to right of appeal and trial by jury, all 
criminal causes wherein the punishment is less than imprison- 
ment in the state prison. 

Art. 77. No person shall hold the office of judge of any court, 
or judge of probate, or sheriff of any county, after he has 
attained the age of seventy years. 

Art. 78. No judge of any court or justice of the peace shall 
act as attorney, or be of counsel to any party, or originate any 
civil suit, in matters which shall come or be brought before him 
as judge or justice of the peace. 

Art. 79. All matters relating to the probate of wills and 
granting letters of administration shall be exercised by the 
judges of probate in such manner as the legislature have di- 
rected or may hereafter direct ; and the judges of probate shall 
hold their courts at such place or places, on such fixed days 
as the conveniency of the people may require and the legislature 
from time to time appoint. 



rt. 80. No judge or register of probate shall be of counsel, 

as advocate, or receive any fees as advocate or counsel, in 

probate business which is pending or may be brought into 

court of probate in the county of which he is judge or 

ister. 

CLERKS OF COURTS. 

rt. 81. The judges of the courts (those of probate ex- 
ted) shall appoint their respective clerks, to hold their office 
ing pleasure ; and no such clerk shall act as an attorney or 
Df counsel in any cause in the court of which he is a clerk, 
shall he draw any writ originating a civil action. 

ENCOURAGEMENT OF LITERATURE, ETC. 

RT. 82. Knowledge and learning generally diffused through 
immunity being essential to the preservation of a free gov- 
ment, and spreading the opportunities and advantages of 
cation through the various parts of the country being highly 
ducive to promote this end, it shall be the duty of the legis- 
ts and magistrates, in all future periods of this govern- 
tt, to cherish the interest of literature and the sciences, and 
seminaries and public schools ; to encourage private and 
lie institutions, rewards and immunities for the promotion 
igriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, manufactures 
natural history of the country ; to countenance and incul- 
the principles of humanity and general benevolence, public 
private charity, industry and economy, honesty and punc- 
ty, sincerity, sobriety and all social affections and generous 
iments, among the people ; provided, nevertheless, that no 
ey raised by taxation shall ever be granted or applied for 
use of the schools or institutions of any religious sect or 
)mination. Free and fair competition in the trades and 
istries is an inherent and essential right of the people and 
ild be protected against all monopolies and conspiracies 
m tend to hinder or destroy it. The size and functions of 
corporations should be so limited and regulated as to pro- 
fc fictitious capitalization, and provision should be made for 
supervision and government thereof : — Therefore, all just 
er possessed by the state is hereby granted to the general 
t to enact laws to prevent the operations within the state 
11 persons and associations, and all trusts and corporations, 
ign and domestic, and the officers thereof, who endeavor to 
i the price of any article of commerce or to destroy free and 
competition in the trades and industries through combina- 
conspiracy, monopoly or any other unfair means ; to con- 
and regulate the acts of all such persons, associations, 
orations, trusts and officials doing business within the state ; 
revent fictitious capitalization ; and to authorize civil and 



126 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

criminal proceedings in respect to all the wrongs herein de- 
clared against. 

OATHS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS. — EXCLUSION FROM OFFICES. — COMMIS- 
SIONS. — WRITS. — CONFIRMATION OF LAWS. — HABEAS CORPUS. — THE 

ENACTING STYLE. CONTINUANCE OF OFFICERS. PROVISION FOR A 

FUTURE REVISION OF THE CONSTITUTION. — ETC. 

Art. 83. Any person chosen governor, councilor, senator or 
representative, military or civil officer (town officers excepted), 
accepting the trust, shall, before he proceeds to execute the 
duties of his office, make and subscribe the following declara- 
tions, viz. : — 

I, A B, do solemnly swear that I will bear faith and true al- 
legiance to the state of New Hampshire and will support the 
constitution thereof. So help me God. 

I, A B, do solemnly and sincerely swear and affirm that I 
will faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the 

duties incumbent on me as , according to the best 

of my abilities, agreeably to the rules and regulations of this 
constitution and the laws of the state of New Hampshire. So 
help me God. 

Any person having taken and subscribed the oath of alle- 
giance, and the same being filed in the secretary's office, he 
shall not be obliged to take said oath again. 

Provided, always, when any person chosen or appointed as 
aforesaid shall be of the denomination called Quakers, or shall 
be scrupulous of swearing and shall decline taking the said 
oaths, such person shall take and subscribe them, omitting the 
word "swear" and likewise the words "So help me God" sub- 
joining instead thereof, "This I do under the pains and penalties 
of perjury." 

Art. 84. And the oaths or affirmations shall be taken and 
subscribed by the governor, before the president of the senate, 
in presence of both houses of the legislature ; and by the sena- 
tors and representatives first elected under this constitution, as 
altered and amended, before the president of the state and a 
majority of the council then in office, and forever afterward 
before the governor and council for the time being ; and by all 
other officers, before such persons and in such manner as the 
legislature shall from time to time appoint. 

Art. 85. All commissions shall be in the name of the state 
of New Hampshire, signed by the governor, and attested by the 
secretary or his deputy, and shall have the great seal of the 
state affixed thereto. 

Art. 86. All writs issuing out of the clerk's office, in any of 
the courts of law, shall be in the name of the state of New 
Hampshire, shall be under the seal of the court whence they 
issue, and bear teste of the chief, first or senior justice of the 
court ; but, when such justice shall be interested, then the writ 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 127 

ill bear teste of some other justice of the court, to which the 
ne shall be returnable ; and be signed by the clerk of such 
irt. 

LBT. 87. All indictments, presentments and information shall 
lclude, "against the peace and dignity of the state.'''' 
VRT. 88. The estate of such persons as may destroy their own 
>S shall not for that offense be forfeited, but descend or 
end in the same manner as if such persons had died in a 
;ural way. Nor shall any article which shall accidentally 
asion the death of any person be henceforth deemed a 
)dand, or in any wise forfeited on account of such misfortune. 
^rt. 89. All the laws which have heretofore been adopted, 
:d and approved in the province, colony or state of New 
mpshire, and usually practiced on in the courts of law, shall 
nain and be in full force until altered and repealed by the 
islature, such parts thereof only excepted as are repugnant 
the rights and liberties contained in this constitution ; pro- 
ed, that nothing herein contained, when compared with the 
enty-third article in the bill of rights, shall be construed to 
ect the laws already made respecting' the persons or estates 
absentees. 

^.rt. 90. The privilege and benefit of the habeas corpus shall 
enjoyed in this state in the most free, easy, cheap, ex- 
itious and ample manner, and shall not be suspended by the 
slature except upon the most urgent and pressing occasions, 

for a time not exceeding three months. 
RT. 91. The enacting style, in making and passing acts, 
tutes and laws, shall be, Be it enacted by the senate and house 
representatives in general court convened. 

rt. 92. No governor or judge of the supreme judicial court 
hold any office or place under the authority of this state, 
pt such as by this constitution they are admitted to hold, 
ing that the judges of the said court may hold the offices of 
ices of the peace throughout the state ; nor shall they hold 
place or office or receive any pension or salary from any 
r state, government or power whatever. 

rt. 93. No person shall be capable of exercising at the same 
more than one of the following offices within this state, 
judge of probate, sheriff, register of deeds ; and never 
e than two offices of profit, which may be held by appoint- 
t of the governor, or governor and council, or senate and 
e of representatives, or superior or inferior courts, military 
es and offices of justices of the peace excepted. 
it. 94. No person holding the office of judge of any court 
ept special judges) , secretary, treasurer of the state, at- 
ey-general, commissary-general, military officers receiving 
from the continent or this state (excepting officers of the 
ia occasionally called forth on an emergency), registers of 



128 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

deeds, sheriff or officers of the customs, including" naval of- 
ficers, collectors of excise and state and continental taxes here- 
after appointed, and not having settled their accounts with the 
respective officers with whom it is their duty to settle such 
accounts, members of congress or any person holding any office 
under the United States, shall at the same time hold the office 
of governor, or have a seat in the senate or house of repre- 
sentatives or council ; but his being chosen and appointed to 
and accepting the same shall operate as a resignation of their 
seat in the chair, senate or house of representatives or council, 
and the place so vacated shall be filled up. No member of the 
council shall have a seat in the senate or house of repre- 
sentatives. 

Art. 95. No person shall ever be admitted to hold a seat in 
the legislature, or any office of trust or importance under this 
government, who, in the due course of law, has been convicted 
of bribery or corruption in obtaining an election or appoint- 
ment. 

Art. 96. In all cases where sums of money are mentioned in 
this constitution, the value thereof shall be computed in silver 
at six shillings and eight pence per ounce. 

Art. 97. To the end that there may be no failure of justice 
or danger to the state by the alterations and amendments made 
in the constitution, the general court is hereby fully authorized 
and directed to fix the time when the alterations and amend- 
ments shall take effect, and make the necessary arrangements 
accordingly. 

Art. 98. It shall be the duty of the selectmen and assessors 
of the several towns and places in this state, in warning the 
first annual meetings for the choice of senators, after the ex- 
piration of seven years from the adoption of this constitution 
as amended, to insert expressly in the warrant this purpose 
among the others for the meeting, to wit, to take the sense 
of the qualified voters on the subject of a revision of the con- 
stitution ; and, the meeting being warned accordingly, and not 
otherwise, the moderator shall take the sense of the qualified 
voters present as to the necessity of a revision ; and a return 
of the number of votes for and against such necessity shall be 
made by the clerks, sealed up and directed to the general court 
at their then next session ; and if it shall appear to the general 
court by such return that the sense of the people of the state 
has been taken, and that, in the opinion of a majority of the 
qualified voters in the state present and voting at said meet- 
ings, there is a necessity for a revision of the constitution, it 
shall be the duty of the general court to call a convention for 
that purpose ; otherwise the general court shall direct the sense 
of the people to be taken, and then proceed in the manner 
before mentioned; the delegates to be chosen in the same man- 




OF THE SENATE 




PRE5IPENT ? 

te vy 



ARTHUR RMORRILL.R.II 

SPEAKER 
OF THE HOUSE 



CONSTITUTIONAL OFFICERS 



r 




J.WESLEY PLVHMEX'Rlfvf' 
STATE TREASURER / J 




EPWIIK.6EAN.R. 

SECRETARY OF STATE 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 129 

ner and proportioned as the representatives to the general 
court; provided, that no alteration shall be made in this con- 
stitution before the same shall be laid before the towns and 
unincorporated places and approved by two thirds of the quali- 
fied voters present and voting on the subject. 

Art. 99. And the same method of taking- the sense of the 
people as to a revision of the constitution, and calling* a con- 
vention for that purpose, shall be observed afterward, at the 
expiration of every seven years. 

Art. 100. This form of government shall be enrolled on 
parchment and deposited in the secretary's office, and be a part 
of the laws of the land, and printed copies thereof shall be 
prefixed to the books containing the laws of this state in all 
future editions thereof. 



THE STATE CONSTITUTION. 

The government of New Hampshire is founded upon a con- 
stitution. This constitution was established when the state 
came into being, after the Kevolutionary War, and has been 
remodelled and amended from time to time into its present form. 

It was in 1775 that the American Continental Congress, which 
was the governing body of the colonies during the Revolution, 
granted to the province of New Hampshire the right to set up 
its own government free and independent of English rule. 
Thereupon a call was issued to the cities and towns to send dele- 
gates to the Fifth Provincial Congress to "establish such a form 
of government as in their judgment will best produce the happi- 
ness of the people, and most effectually secure peace and good 
order in the province during the continuance of the present 
dispute between Great Britain and the colonies." This was in 
reality the first constitutional convention. 

General John Sullivan of the Revolutionary Army was the 
leading personality in the framing of the first form of govern- 
ment. Meshech Weare was head of the provincial government 
at the time and he called the congress to order at Exeter. The 
congress resolved itself into a house of representatives and chose 
an executive council. 

The first constitution was then drawn up and went into effect 
as organic law of the province in 1776. It provided for a bi- 
cameral legislature of a house of representatives and a council 
of twelve, with a president at the head of the council. No law 
should be passed except by vote of both houses and all money- 
raising bills should originate in the house of representatives. 
All officers were to be appointed by the two houses, with but 
few exceptions. 



130 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Declaeation of Independence. 

The first constitution was never voted upon by the people, 
but went into effect upon adoption by the congress. It was de- 
signed to govern the province until after the Revolution and it 
was similar to the organic laws of other revolting provinces. 
It continued in force over eight years. New Hampshire was the 
first state to have a written constitution. 

When the new legislature was not in session, government was 
vested in a committee of safety appointed by it. Courts were 
established in 1776 and the name of the Province of New Hamp- 
shire was changed to "State of New Hampshire." A declaration 
of state independence was made nineteen days before the na- 
tional Declaration of Independence on the Fourth of July. 

In 1778 the second constitutional convention met at Concord. 
A constitution was framed continuing a bi-cameral legislature 
to be known as the "general court" and the house of representa- 
tives was to be elected by the votes of taxpayers (male Protes- 
tants only). This document was submitted to a vote of the 
people and was rejected. 

Accordingly in 1781 the third constitutional convention met at 
Concord. A constitution was drawn up and submitted to the 
people and rejected, and the convention then met again in 1782 
and drew up another form. This was also rejected by popular 
vote and the convention was obliged to make a third try at it. 
The third draft was voted upon favorably by the people and went 
into effect. 

The new constitution was similar to that which had been 
adopted by Massachusetts. The first part of it consisted of a 
bill of rights of thirty-eight articles. Government was founded 
on the consent of the governed; it was divided into three 
branches — executive, legislative and judicial. The upper branch 
of the legislature was to be a senate of twelve and the lower 
branch a house of members elected from the towns, a member 
for each town with one hundred and fifty "polls," two members 
for towns having four hundred and fifty polls and an additional 
member for each additional three hundred polls. "President" 
was the title given the chief executive officer and he was given 
a seat and vote in the senate but he had no veto power. A 
council was created to act with the president in making ap- 
pointments, the council to be elected by the legislature, and to 
consist of two senators and three representatives. Judicial 
officers were to hold office during good behavior and to be re- 
moveable by address. Property and Protestant religious quali- 
fications were required of voters. The election of congressmen 
was by the legislature. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 131 

Constitution of 1784. 

Such was the constitution of 1784, and with many minor 
changes this constitution has remained in force ever since and 
is today the organic law of the state. This succeeded the first 
constitution or the constitution of 1776 and is the "second con- 
stitution," so called. 

This constitution provided among other things that in seven 
years the fourth constitutional convention might, if the people 
so voted, be assembled and this was done in 1791 at Concord. 
Seventy-two changes were proposed and submitted to popular 
vote. Forty-six of these were adopted by two-thirds vote of the 
people and twenty-six were rejected. The convention then drew 
up another set of amendments and these were later adopted by 
the people as a whole. 

For the next sixty years there was no change in the organic 
law, although a convention could have been called once in seven 
years if the people had desired. No other state has lived under 
a constitution without change for so long a period. 

The fifth constitutional convention met at Concord in 1850 
under the presidency of Franklin Pierce, later President of the 
United States. Fifteen amendments were submitted to popular 
vote and all were turned down. The convention then resub- 
mitted three of the rejected propositions. Only one of these, 
an amendment to do away with the property qualifications for 
voting, was adopted on the second try. The other two resub- 
mitted were to abolish the religious test for office and to provide 
a new method of amending the constitution. 

The Sixth Convention. 

The sixth constitutional convention met at Concord in 1876, 
over a quarter-century since the fifth. Thirteen amendments 
were submitted and eleven of them were adopted by popular 
vote. The basis of representation in the legislature was changed 
from that of ratable polls to that of population. The legisla- 
ture was to meet every other year instead of every year and the 
number of senators was to be increased from twelve to twenty- 
four. Sheriffs were to be elected by popular vote, the religious 
test was abolished and the time of holding the elections was 
changed from March to November. 

In 1889 the seventh convention met and submitted seven 
amendments, five of which were adopted. Prohibition and a 
proposition to make the bill of rights non-sectarian were de- 
feated, but the propositions adopted were to classify small 
towns for representation in the legislature, provide for the suc- 
cession of the speaker of the house to the governorship in the 
event of the death or removal of the governor and the president 



132 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

of the senate, new elections to fill vacancies in the senate, fixed 
salaries for legislators and legislative sessions in January 
instead of June. 

In 1902 the eighth constitutional convention met at Concord 
under the presidency of General Frank S. Streeter of that city. 
About seventy resolutions for amending the constitution were 
submitted and ten of them were adopted by the convention and 
voted upon by the people. 

An educational qualification for voting and holding office was 
ratified by 28,601 to 8,205. Examination of captains and subal- 
terns in the militia before appointment was ratified by 23,228 
to 7,377. Extension of the taxing power of the legislature was 
ratified by 20,917 to 10,306. Eegulations of trusts, monopolies 
and combinations in restraint of trade was ratified by 23,732 to 
8,659. 

An amendment to abolish the election of a commissary-general 
of the militia by the legislature was rejected by 17,951 to 10,082, 
two-thirds affirmative vote being necessary. Extension of the 
jurisdiction of police courts was rejected by 19,736 to 11,289. 
The elimination of the words "evangelical" and "Protestant" 
from the bill of rights was rejected by 16,611 to 15,727. Woman 
suffrage was rejected by 13,089 to 21,788, and reduction in the 
size of the house of representatives by changing the basis of 
representation by 20,295 to 13,069. The creation of voting pre- 
cincts was rejected by 16,747 to 13,391. 

Convention of 1912. 

The ninth constitutional convention met in 1912 at Concord 
under the presidency of Edwin F. Jones of Manchester and en- 
tertained sixty-one resolutions for amending the constitution. 
Twelve propositions were submitted to the people and four of 
them were adopted and became a part of the constitution.^ 

Disfranchisement for treason, bribery and wilful violation of 
the election laws was adopted by 22,383 to 8,322. The abolition 
of the majority vote requirements for the election of governor, 
councilors "and senators was carried by 21,120 to 9,801. Further 
extension of the jurisdiction of police courts was approved by 
18,606 to 8,291. The abolition of the property basis for repre- 
sentation in the executive council and the substitution of popu- 
lation as a basis was carried by 19,196 to 6,901. 

Increase in the size of the senate and the abolition of property 
basis for senatorial representation was defeated by 19,443 to 
13 931 Change in the basis of representation in the house of 
representatives was defeated by 21,399 to 10,952. Giving the 
legislature the right to classify property for purposes of taxation 
was defeated by 23,108 to 12,636. Graduation and classification 
of inheritance taxation was defeated by 18,432 to 9,699. Substitu- 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 133 



tion on an income tax for a direct tax on certain corporations 
was defeated by 19,200 to 10,151. Abolition of the word "Protes- 
tant" and other religious qualifications in the bill of rights was 
defeated by 16,555 to 14,315. Abolition of the one-year pension 
limits was defeated by 16,708 to 11,440. Extending- the authority 
of the governor in his veto power over appropriations was de- 
feated by 17,942 to 9,325. 

The next convention to revise the constitution will be the 
tenth. Once in seven years a referendum is taken as to the 
desire of the people to have a convention meet. The legislature 
of 1915 provided that such a vote should be polled at the election 
of 1916 and if the vote should be in favor of calling a tenth 
convention, delegates to it could be elected in 1918 and the con- 
vention could sit that year or the following. The constitution 
printed in this book is as amended by the nine conventions and 
vote of the people and is today the organic law of New Hamp- 
shire. 

BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT. 

The constitution divides the government into three branches. 
They are the executive branch, the legislative branch and the 
judicial branch. The executive department consists of the gov- 
ernor and council, the secretary of state, the deputy secretary 
of state, the treasurer, the commissary-general and such other 
officers as the legislature has established. The legislative branch 
consists of a senate and house of representatives. The judicial 
branch consists of a system of courts established by the legis- 
lature. The military establishment is part of the executive 
branch and the governor is commander-in-chief of the military 
establishment. 

In addition to the several constitutional officers mentioned 
above, the legislature has, from time to time, arranged and 
organized new offices so that the government now includes the 
following departments : 

Governor. 

Executive council. 

Department of state. 

Treasury. 

Militia. 

Legislature. 

Judiciary. 

Bank commission. 

Public service commission. 

Insurance department. 

Fish and game department. 

Department of public instruction. 

Department of agriculture. 



134 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Commission of pharmacy and practical chemistry. 

Tax commission. 

Department of health. 

Forestry department. 

Department of records. 

Dental board. 

Ballot law commission. 

Department of labor. 

Department of charities and corrections. 

Medical board. 

Veterinary examining- board. 

Printing commission. 

Excise commission. 

Highway department. 

Optometry board. 

Department of institutions. 

Department of motor vehicles. 

In subsequent chapters will be given brief sketches of the his- 
tories of these departments in order given, together with a list 
of the men who have occupied the more important posts in the 
government from the time of earliest provincial days to the 
present. Colonial government began in 1680 and state govern- 
ment under the constitution began in 1784. The colonial period 
included about ninety-five years down to the revolution in 1775. 
The revolutionary period included about nine years to the con- 
stitution and the history of the state is now in its one hundred 
and thirty-third year. 

THE GOVERNOR. 

The governor is the chief executive and his title is "his ex- 
cellency." Provincial governors were appointed by the king of 
England and they had various titles such as "president," "lieu- 
tenant-governor," "deputy-governor" and "governor." For the 
first eighty years governors frequently did not reside in the 
province. 

When the revolution broke out the royal governor withdrew, 
in 1775, and the province was ruled by a revolutionary conven- 
tion headed by a president. The next year a temporary con- 
stitution provided for a president of a council and chairman of 
a committee of safety to be the chief executive. The constitu- 
tion of 1784 provided for a president to be elected by popular 
vote and in 1792 the title was changed to governor. In 1913 the 
election of the governor was changed from the majority-vote 
system to the plurality-vote system. Previous to that the 
failure of a candidate to receive a majority vote threw the elec- 
tion into the legislature. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 135 

The following is a list of the seventy-five men who have been 
chief executives tog-ether with the title under which each served 
and the years in office. 

CHIEF EXECUTIVES 

Name and Residence. Title. Term. 

John Cutt, Portsmouth President 1680-81 

Richard Waldron, Dover Deputy-President 1681-82 

Edward Cranfield, London, Eng Lieutenant-Governor... 1682-85 

Walter Barefoote, London, Eng Deputy-Governor 1685-86 

Joseph Dudley, Roxbury, Mass President-Governor... 1686-87,1702-16 

Edmund Andros, London, Eng Governor 1687—89 

Simon Bradstreet, Salem, Mass Governor 1689-92 

John Usher, Boston, Mass Lieutenant-Governor... 1692—97 

William Partridge, Portsmouth Lieutenant-Governor. . . 1697-98, 1701-02 

Samuel Allen, London, Eng Governor 1698—99 

Earl of Bellomont, New York Governor 1699-1701 

Samuel Shute, Boston, Mass Governor 1716-23 

John Wentworth, Portsmouth Lieutenant-Governor... 1723-28 

William Burnet, Boston, Mass Governor 1728—30 

Jonathan Belcher, Boston, Mass Governor 1730—41 

Benning Wentworth, Portsmouth Governor 1741—66 

John Wentworth, Portsmouth Governor 1767-75 

Matthew Thornton, Merrimack President 1775-76 

Meshech Weare, Hampton Falls President 1776-85 

John Langdon, Portsmouth President, Governor... 1785-86,88-89 

1805-09, 10-12 

John Sullivan, Durham President, Governor... 1786-88,89-90 

Josiah Bartlett, Kingston ..President, Governor... 1790-94 

John T. Gilman, Exeter Governor 1794-1805,13-16 

Jeremiah Smith, Exeter Governor 1809-10 

William Plumer, Epping Governor 1812-13, 16-19 

Samuel Bell, Chester Governor 1819-23 

Levi Woodbury, Portsmouth Governor 1823-24 

David L. Morrill, Goffstown Governor 1824-27 

Benjamin Pierce, Hillsborough Governor 1827-28,29-30 

John Bell, Chester Governor 1828-29 

Matthew Harvey, Hopkinton Governor 1830-31 

Joseph M. Harper, Canterbury Acting Governor 1831 

Samuel Dinsmoor, Keene Governor 1831—34 

William Badger, Gilmanton Governor 1834—36 

Isaac Hill, Concord Governor 1836-39 

John Page, Haverhill Governor 1839-42 

Henry Hubbard, Charlestown Governor 1842—44 

John H. Steele, Peterborough Governor 1844—46 

Anthony Colby, New London Governor 1846—47 

Jared W. Williams, Lancaster Governor 1847-49 

Samuel Dinsmoor, Keene... Governor 1849—52 

Noah Martin, Dover Governor 1852—54 

Nathaniel B. Baker, Concord Governor 1854—55 

Ralph Metcalf, Concord Governor 1855-57 

William Haile, Hinsdale Governor 1857-59 

Ichabod Goodwin, Portsmouth Governor 1859-61 

Nathaniel S. Berry, Hebron Governor 1861-63 

Joseph A. Gilmore, Concord Governor 1863—65 

Frederick Smyth, Manchester Governor 1865—67 

Walter Harriman, Warner Governor 1867-69 

Onslow Stearns, Concord Governor 1869—71 

James A. Weston, Manchester Governor 1871—72,74—75 

Ezekiel A. Straw, Manchester Governor 1872-74 

Person C. Cheney, Manchester Governor 1875—77 

Benjamin F. Prescott, Epping Governor 1877-79 



136 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Name and Residence. Title. Term. 

Natt Head, Hooksett Governor 1879-81 

Charles H. Bell, Exeter Governor 1881-83 

Samuel W. Hale, Keene Governor 1883-85 

Moody Currier, Manchester Governor 1885—87 

Charles H. Sawyer, Dover Governor 1887-89 

David H. Goodell, Antrim Governor 1889-91 

Hiram A. Tuttle, Pittsfield Governor 1891-93 

John B. Smith, Hillsborough Governor 1893-95 

Charles A. Busiel, Laconia Governor 1895—97 

George A. Ramsdell, Nashua Governor 1897-99 

Frank W. Rollins, Concord Governor 1899-1901 

Chester B. Jordan, Lancaster Governor 1901—03 

Nahum J. Bachelder, Andover Governor 1903—05 

John McLane, Milford Governor 1905—07 

Charles M. Floyd, Manchester Governor 1907—09 

Henry B. Quinby, Laconia Governor 1909—11 

Robert P. Bass, Peterborough Governor 1911-13 

Samuel D. Felker, Rochester Governor 1913-15 

Rolland H. Spaulding, Rochester Governor 1915—17 

Henry W. Keyes, Haverhill Governor 1917- 

GUBERNATORIAL VOTES 



(t Indicates election by the people, * by the legislature.) 

Year. 

1784 Meshech Weare unanimously elected "president." 

(NOTE — There was no party alignment during the early years of the 
government. Followers of the national constitutional government, headed 
by John Sullivan and John T. Gilman were Federalists, and the opposition 
was known as the anti-Federalist party.) 

Total 
Year. Federalist. Anti-Federalist. Vote. 



1785 George Atkinson 

1786 John Sullivan... 



. . . 2,755 

. . . 4,309f 

1787 John Sullivan 3,642* 

. . . 3,664 

. . . 3,657* 



1788 John Sullivan 

1789 John Sullivan 

1790 John Pick ering 3. 

1791 

1792 

1793 John T. Gilman 

1794 John T. Gilman 7 

1795 John T. Gilman 9 

1796 John T. Gilman 7 

1797 John T. Gilman 



John Langdon 2,497* 

John Langdon 3,600 

John Langdon 4,034 



708 

829t 
340t 



John Langdon. 
Josiah Bartlett. 
Josiah Bartlett. 
Josiah Bartlett. 
Josiah Bartlett. 



4,421f 
968 
1,676* 
8,697t 
8,092t 
Josiah Bartlett 7,388f 



9,625t 



7,079 
8,567 
9,285 
8,838 
8,545 
7,762 
8,967 
8,389 
9,854 
10,470 
9,440 
10,775 
10,823 



(NOTE — The Republican party, or Republican-Democratic party, was or- 
ganized about this time by the supporters of Thomas Jefferson, vice- 
president and candidate for the presidency in 1796, 1800 and 1804.) 

Total 
Year. Federalist. Republican. Vote. 



1798 John T. Gilman 9,397f 

1799 John T. Gilman 10,138t 

1800 John T. Gilman 10,362f 

1801 John T. Gilman 10,898f 

1802 John T. Gilman 10,377t 

1803 John T. Gilman 12,263t 

1804 John T. Gilman 12,216t 

1805 John T. Gilman 12,287 

1806 John T. Gilman 1,553 



Oliver Peabody 1,189 



6,039 
5,249 
8,753 
9,011 
12,039 
16,097f 



Timothy Walker. 
Timothy Walker. 
John Langdon.... 

John Langdon 

John Langdon 

John Langdon. 



John Langdon 15,277f 



12,153 
11,738 
16,762 
16,639 
19,166 
21,317 
24,280 
28,443 
20,573 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



137 



Year. 
1807 

1808 
1809 
1810 
1811 
1812 
1813 
1814 
1815 
1816 
1817 
1818 
1819 
1820 
1821 
1822 



Federalist. 

John T. Gilman 

John T. Gilman 1, 

Jeremiah Smith 15, 



Jeremiah Smith... 
Jeremiah Smith... 
John T. Gilman. .. 
John T. Gilman... 
John T. Gilman... 
John T. Gilman. . . 

James Sheafe 

James Sheafe 

Jeremiah Mason. . 

William Hale 

William Hale 

William Hale 

David L. Morrill. 



926 
261 
610f 

166 

477 

613 

107t 

695t 

357t 

994 

029 

850 

660 

596 

207 

279 



Republican. 

John Langdon 13, 

John Langdon 12, 

John Langdon 15, 

John Langdon 16, 

John Langdon 17 

William Plumer 15 : 

William Plumer 17 

. 18 

. 17 

Plumer 20 

Plumer 19 

William Plumer 18 

Samuel Bell 13 

Bell 22 

Bell 22 

Bell 22 



William Plumer 
William Plumer 
William 
William 



Samuel 
Samuel 
Samuel 





Vote. 


,912f 


16,861 


,641f 


15,899 


,241 


30,983 


;,482f 


31,734 


,552t 


32,094 


.,492* 


31,982 


',410 


35,729 


1,794 


38,542 


',799 


36,194 


l,338f 


38,407 


i,088t 


35,375 


!,674t 


31,465 


:,76it 


24,265 


;,2i2t 


24,771 


!,582t 


24,448 


!,934t 


23,980 



(NOTE — In 1820 the Federalist party had disappeared and the Republicans 
were practically unopposed. In 1823 there was a split in the party, by which 
Samuel Dinsmoor, the regular nominee, was defeated by the insurgent can- 
didacy of Levi Woodbury.) 

Total 
Year. Regular Republicans. Insurgent Republicans. Vote. 



1823 Samuel Dinsmoor 12,718 Levi Woodbury. 



16,985t 29,943 



(NOTE — In the presidential campaign of 1824 the party split all over the 
country between the supporters of Andrew Jackson, who organized the 
Democratic party, and those of John Q. Adams, who called themselves Na- 
tional Republicans. Jackson received the most votes, but the election was 
thrown into congress, which chose Adams.) 

Total 
Year. Republican. Democrat. Vote. 



1824 David L. Morrill 14,899* 

1825 David L. Morrill 29,166t 

1826 David L. Morrill 17,578t 

1827 David L. Morrill 2,529 

1828 John Bell 21,149f 

1829 John Bell 19,583 

1830 Timothy Upham 19,040 

1831 Ichabod Bartlett 18,681 

1832 Ichabod Bartlett 14,920 

1833 Arthur Livermore 3,959 



Levi Woodbury 11,741 30,348 

Benjamin Pierce 194 29,729 

Benjamin Pierce 12,287 30,251 

Benjamin Pierce 23,695f 27.411 

Benjamin Pierce 18,672 39,897 

Benjamin Pierce 22,615f 42,246 

Matthew Harvey 23,214f 42,441 

Samuel Dinsmoor 23,503t 42,294 

Samuel Dinsmoor 24,167f 30,233 

Samuel Dinsmoor 28,2771 33,476 



(NOTE — When Jackson ran for the presidency a third time in 1832, his 
opponents dropped the name of Republican and took that of Whig.) 

Total 
Vote. 



Year. Whig. 

1834 Arthur Livermore 78 

1835 Joseph Healey 14,825 

1836 Joseph Healey 2,566 

1837 Joseph Healey 557 

1838 James Wilson, Jr 25,244 

1839 James Wilson, Jr 23,928 



1840 Enos Stevens 20,716 John Page. 



Democrat. 

William Badger 28,542f 

William Badger 25,767f 

Isaac Hill 24,904f 

Isaac Hill 22,361f 

Isaac Hill 28,697f 

John Page 30,518f 



29,521t 



30,173 
40,900 
30,925 
24,532 
54,570 
54,601 
50,799 



(NOTE — In 1841 a party in opposition to slavery, called the Free Soil 
party, made its appearance in state politics, and in 1848 it displaced the 
Whig party as the leading minority faction. In that year it became a 
national party and nominated former President Martin Van Buren for the 
presidency.) 



— ©FTHIE — 



iECRETARY 
OF STATE 



Q 



N0.3 



60VERH0R 

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.NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



139 



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NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUA'L. 



1884 
1886 
1888 
1890 
1892 
1894 
1896 
1898 
1900 
1902 
1904 
1906 
1908 
1910 



Republican. 

William Haile 34,216t 

William Haile 36,215t 

Ichabod Goodwin 36,326f 

Ichabod Goodwin 38,037t 

Nathaniel S. Berry 35,467f 

Nathaniel S. Berry 32,150f 

Joseph A. Gilmore 29,035* 

Joseph A. Gilmore 37,006t 

Frederick Smyth 33,167t 

Frederick Smyth 35,136f 

Walter Harriman 35,809f 

Walter Harriman 39,724t 



(NOTE — Opposition to the Democratic party after 1856 united in the Re- 
publican party, and the American, Whig and Free Soil organizations dis- 
appeared. ) 

Total 
Vote. 

65,882 
67,964 
69,155 
71,603 
67,142 
62,470 
66,543 
68,425 
62,218 
65,238 
68,615 
76,850 
67,819 
67,838 
69,823 
76,240 
67,821 
71,893 
79,205 
80,681 
77,870 
77,806 
75,959 
86,164 
76,287 
84,470 
77,391 
90,623 
86,240 
87,060 
83,056 
78,795 
82,475 
90,788 
79,173 
88,482 
81,513 
88,549 
84,167 



Year. 

1857 

1858 

1859 

1860 

1861 

1862 

1863 

1864 

1865 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 



Onslow Stearns 35,777f 

Onslow Stearns 34,424f 

James Pike 33,892 

Ezekiel A. Straw 38,325t 

Ezekiel A. Straw 34,023f 

Luther McCutchins 34,143 

Person C. Cheney 39,292* 

Person C. Cheney 41,756f 

Benjamin F. Prescott... 40,755t 

Benjamin F. Prescott.... 39,372* 

Natt Head 38,075t 

Charles H. Bell 44,432f 

Samuel W. Hale 38,402t 

Moody Currier 42,514f 

Charles H. Sawyer 37,796f 

David H. Goodell 44,809* 

Hiram A. Tuttle 42,479* 

John B. Smith 43,676f 

Charles F. Busiel 46,491f 

George A. Ramsdell. .. . . 48,387f 

Frank W. Rollins 44,730t 

Chester B. Jordan 53,891t 

Nahum J. Bachelder. . . . 42,115f 

John McLane 51,171t 

Charles M. Floyd 40,581* 

Henry B. Quinby 44,630f 

Robert P. Bass 44,908f 



Democrat. 

John S. Wells 31,214 

Asa P. Cate 31,677 

Asa P. Cate 32,802 

Asa P. Cate 33,544 

George Stark 31,452 

George Stark 28,566 

Ira A. Eastman 32,833 

Edw. W. Harrington. 31,340 

Edw. W. Harrington. 27,735 

John G. Sinclair 30,484 

John G. Sinclair 32,663 

John G. Sinclair 37,098 

John Bedel 32,001 

John Bedel 24,992 

James A. Weston 34,799* 

James A. Weston 36,585 

James A. Weston 32,016 

James A. Weston 35,608* 

Hiram R. Roberts 39,121 

Daniel Marcy 38,500 

Daniel Marcy 36,721 

Frank A. McKean.... 37,860 

Frank A. McKean 31,138 

Frank Jones 40,813 

Martin V. B. Edgerly 36,916 

John M. Hill 39,637 

Thomas Cogswell 37,338 

Charles H. Amsden.. 44,217 

Charles H. Amsden.. 42,386 

Luther F. McKinney. 41,501 

Henry O. Kent 33,959 

Henry O. Kent 28,333 

Charles F. Stone 35,653 

Frederick E. Potter.. 34,956 

Henry F. Hollis 33,844 

Henry F. Hollis 35,437 

Nathan C. Jameson. . 37,672 

Clarence E. Carr 41,386 

Clarence E. Carr 37,737 



(NOTE — In 1912 the Republican party split at the presidential convention 
and the defeated faction organized the Progressive party, and ran former 
President Theodore Roosevelt for the presidency.) 

Total 
Year. Republican. Democrat. Vote. 

1912 Franklin Worcester 32,504 Samuel D. Felker 34,203* 83,178 

1914 Rolland H. Spaulding. . 46,413f Albert W. Noone 33,674 84,108 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 141 



Revolutionary Councilors, 1776-84. 

Article 59 of the second part of the constitution provides for 
an executive council of five men to advise and act with the 
governor. Before the constitution there was a council both 
under the temporary constitution of the Revolution and under 
the provincial government. Since 1913 councilors have been 
elected by plurality vote to represent population but previously 
to that they were elected by majority vote to represent property, 
and in the colonial days they were appointed. 

The following is a complete list of all the councilors since the 
Revolution, giving the name of each and the year in which he 
was elected or appointed. 

Revolutionary Councilors, 1776-84. 

Name and Residence. Years Served. 

Meshech Weare, Hampton Falls 1776-84 

Josiah Bartlett, Kingston 1776-84 

John Wentworth, Dover 17 76-84 

William Whipple, Portsmouth 1776-77 

Matthew Thornton, Merrimack 1776-77, 80-81 

Nathaniel Folsom, Exeter 1776-77, 83-84 

Ebenezer Thompson, Durham 1776-81 

Wyseman Claggett, Litchfield 1776-77, 81-82 

Jonathan Blanchard, Dunstable 1776-79 

Samuel Ashley, Winchester 1776-80 

Benjamin Giles, Newport 1776-77 

John Hurd, Haverhill 1776-77 

Nicholas Gilman, Exeter 1777-84 

George Atkinson, Portsmouth 1777-81 

Matthew Patten, Bedford j 1777-79 

Timothy Walker, Concord 1777-80 

Benjamin Bellows, Walpole 1777-80, 81-84 

Moses Nichols, Amherst 1779-80 

Jacob Abbott, Wilton 1779-81, 82-84 

Charles Johnson, Haverhill 1779-80, 81-82 

John McClary, Epsom 1780-84 

Timothy Farrar, New Ipswich 1780-81, 82-84 

Enoch Hale, Rindge 1780-82 

Samuel Hunt, Charlestown 178 0-81 

Francis Worcester, Plymouth 1780-81, 82-83 

George Frost, Durham 1781-84 

Woodbury Langdon, Portsmouth 1781-84 

John Hale, Hollis 1781-82 

Thomas Sparhawk, Walpole 1782-84 

Thomas Applin, Swanzey 17 83-84 

Moses Dow, Haverhill 1783-84 



142 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Councilors, 1784-1917. 

Name and Residence. Term. 

John McClary, Epsom 1784-85 

Joseph Badger, Gilmanton 1784-85 

Francis Blood, Temple 1784-85 

Nathaniel Peabody, Atkinson 1784-86 

Moses Chase, Cornish 1784-85, 87-88 

John Sullivan, Durham 1785-86 

Matthew Thornton, Merrimack 1785-86 

Amos Shepard, Alstead 1785-87 

Moses Dow, Haverhill 1785-87 

Joshua Wentworth, Portsmouth 1786-87 

Robert Means, Amherst 1786-87 

Christopher Toppan, Hampton 1786-87, 9 0-91, 94-97 

Joseph Gilman, Exeter 1787-88 

Ebenezer Thompson, Durham 1787-88 

Daniel Emerson, Jr., Hollis 1787-88 

John Pickering, Portsmouth 1787-88, 89-90 

Peter Green, Concord 1788-89 

Robert Wallace, Henniker 1788-89 

Ebenezer Smith, Meredith 1788-89 

Josiah Richardson, Keene 1788-89 

William Simpson, Orford 1788-89 

Ichabod Rollins, Somersworth 1789-90 

Charles Barrett, New Ipswich 1789-9 

Sanford Kingsbury, Claremont 1789-9 

Jonathan Freeman, Hanover 178U-9 7 

Lemuel Holmes, Surry 179 0-94 

Robert Wallace, Henniker 1790-1803 

Joseph Badger, Jr., Gilmanton*. . . .1790-93, 96-97, 1805-09 

Nathaniel Rogers, Exeter 1791-92 

Phillips White, South Hampton 179 2-94 

Ebenezer Smith, Durham 179 3-96 

Thomas Bellows, Walpole 1794-99 

Joseph Cilley, Nottingham 1797-99 

Russell Freeman, Hanover 1797-1802 

Aaron Wingate, Farmington 1797-1803 

James Sheafe, Portsmouth 1799-1800 

Samuel Stevens, Charlestown 1799-1805 

Joseph Blanchard, Chester 1800-02 

David Hough, Lebanon 1802-03 

Levi Bartlett, Kingston 1802-08f 

*"Jr." dropped, 1805. 

tAppointed, September 21, 1807, Chief Justice of the Court of Common 
Pleas for the County of Rockingham. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 143 

Name and Residence. Term. 

William Hale, Dover . 1803-05 

Daniel Blasdel, Canaan 1803-08 

Benjamin Pierce, Hillsborough 1803-09, 14-18 

Nahum Parker, Fitzwilliam 1805-07 

Amasa Allen, Walpole 1807-09 

Daniel Gookin, North Hampton 1808-09 

William Tarleton, Piermont 1808-09 

Caleb Ellis, Claremont 1809-10 

Richard Dame, Rochester 1809-11 

Samuel Bell, Amherst 1809-11 

Benjamin J. Gilbert, Hanover 1809-11 

Elijah Hall, Portsmouth 1809-17 

Jedediah K. Smith, Amherst 1810-14 

Nathaniel Upham, Rochester 1811-13 

Jonathan Franklin, Lyme 1811-13 

Ithamar Chase, Cornish 1811-16 

Nathan Taylor, Sanbornton 1813-14 

Enoch Colby, Thornton 1813-18 

Samuel Quarles, Ossipee 1814-17 

Levi Jackson, Cornish 1816-18* 

John M. Page, Tamworth 1817-20 

John Bell, Jr., Chester 1817-22 

Samuel Grant, Walpole 1818-19 

Jeduthun Wilcox, Orford 1818-19 

Richard H. Ayer, Dunbarton 1 818-23 1 

Aaron Matson, Stoddard 1819-21 

John French, Landaff 1819-22 

Richard Odell, Conway 1820-23 

Samuel Dinsmoor, Keene 1821-22 

Elijah Eelding, Swanzey 1822-2 4 

Hunking Penhallow, Portsmouth 1822-25 

Ezra Bartlett, Haverhill .< 1822-25 

Daniel C. Atkinson, Sanbornton. 1823-25 

Jonathan Harvey, Sutton 1823-25 

Thomas C. Drew, Walpole 1824-26 

Daniel Hoit, Sandwich 1825-27 

John Wallace, Jr., Milford 1825-28 

Langley Boardman, Portsmouth 1825-27, 28-29 

Caleb Keith, Wentworth 1825-29 

Jotham Lord, Jr., Westmoreland 1826-29$ 

Andrew Peirce, Dover 1827-29 

Francis N. Fisk, Concord 1827-28, 29-31 

Matthew Harvey, Hopkinton 1828-30 

Benning M. Bean, Moultonborough 1829-30 



♦1817, of Chesterfield. 
tl822, of Hooksett. 
r'Jr." dropped, 1827. 



144 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Name and Residence. Term. 

Stephen P. Webster, Haverhill. 1829-31 

Joseph Healy, Washington 1829-32 

Jesse Bowers, Dunstable (Nashua) 1830-31 

Thomas E. Sawyer, Dover 1830-32 

Samuel C. Webster, Plymouth 1831-32 

Jacob Freese, Deerfield 1831-33 

Stephen Peabody, Milford 1831-34 

Richard Russell, Wakefield 1832-33 

Nathaniel Rix, Littleton 1832-34 

Stephen Johnson, Walpole 1832-35 

Samuel Cushman, Portsmouth 1833-35 

Job Otis, Strafford 1833-36 

Jacob Tuttle, Antrim 1834-36 

Elijah Miller, Hanover 1834-36 

Ezekiel Morrill, Canterbury 1835-37 

Jonathan Gove, Acworth 1835-37 

Samuel Tilton, Sanbornton 1836-38 

Benjamin Evans, Warner 1836-38 

John Page, Haverhill 1836§ 38-39 

Samuel Burns, Rumney 1836-38 

Leonard Bisco, Walpole 1837-38 

Tristram Shaw, Exeter . 1837-39 

Moses Baker, Somersworth 1838-4 

Israel Hunt, Jr., Nashua 1838-40 

Enos Stevens, Charlestown 1838-40 

John L. Elwyn, Portsmouth 1839-40 

John H. White, Lancaster 1839-42 

Isaac Waldron, Portsmouth 1840-41 

Henry B. Rust, Wolfeborough 1840-42 

John H. Steele, Peterborough 1840-42 

Phineas Handerson, Keene 1840-42 

Moses Norris, Jr., Pittsfield 1841-42 

Cyrus Barton, Concord 1842-43 

Samuel Egerton, Langdon 1842-43 

Samuel G. Berry, Barnstead 1842-44 

James McK. Wilkins, Manchester 1842-44 

James H. Johnson, Bath 1842-44 

Elijah R. Currier, Newtown (Newton) .... 1843-45 

Francis Holbrook, Surry 1843-45 

Josiah Bartlett, Lee 1844-46 

William Parker, Francestown 1844-46 

Caleb Blodgett, Canaan 1844-46 

Benjamin Jenness, Deerfield 184 5-46 

Amos Perkins, Unity 1845-46 

John C. Young, Wolfeborough 1846-47 

John Kelly, Exeter 1846-48 



^Resigned to become U. S. Senator. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 145 

Name and Residence. Term. 

Samuel Jones, Bradford 1846-48 

Enos Ferrin, Hebron 1846-48 

Jared Perkins, Unity 1846-49 

Zebulon Pease, Freedom 1847-49 

Mace Moulton, Manchester 1848-49 

Joseph Clough, Canterbury 1848-50 

Isaac Ross, Hanover 1848-50 

John L. Hadley, Weare 1849-51* 

Dana Woodman, New Hampton 1849-51 

Alvah Smith, Lempster 1849-51 

Greenleaf Clarke, Atkinson 18 50-52 

Simeon Warner, Whitefield 1850-52 

George Huntington, Walpole 1851-52 

Joseph H. Smith, Dover 18 51-53 

Samuel Butterfield, Andover 1851-53 

Moses Eaton, Jr., South Hampton 1852-53 

James Batcheller, Marlborough 1852-54 

Russell Cox, Holderness 1852-54 

Uri Lamprey, Hampton 18 53-54 

Zebediah Shattuck, Nashville (Nashua) .... 1853-54 

Abel Haley, Tuftonborough 1853-55 

Edson Hill, Concord 1854-55 

Daniel M. Smith, Lempster 1854-55 

Thomas Merrill, Enfield 1854-55, 56-57 

Thomas Merrill, Enfield 1854-56, 56-57 

William Tenney, Hanover 18 55-56 

John Dame, Portsmouth 1855-57 

Milon C. McClure, Claremont 1855-57 

Nicholas V. Whitehouse, Rochester 1855-56, 57-58 

Thomas Cogswell, Gilmanton 1856-57 

Richard H. Messer, New London 18 56-58 

Daniel Rogers, Columbia 1857-58 

Allen Giffin, Marlow 1857-59 

William H. H. Bailey, Concord 1857-59 

Aurin M. Chase, Whitefield 1858-59 

John N. Worcester, Hollis 18 58-60 

Thomas L. Whitton, Wolfeborough 1858-60 

Cyrus Eastman, Littleton 1859-60 

Reed P. Clark, Londonderry 1859-61 

Robert Elwell, Langdon 1859-61 

Daniel Sawyer, Alton 1860-62 

Moody Currier, Manchester 1860-62 

Denison R. Burnham, Plymouth 186 0-6 2 

Richard P. J. Tenney, Pittsfield 1861-63 

Charles F. Brooks, Westmoreland 1861-63 



'Resigned June 19, 1850, to become Secretary of State; residence, Concord. 



146 NEW HAMPSHIKE MANUAL. 

Name and Residence. ' Term. 

Oliver Wyatt, Dover 1862-63 

Ethan Colby, Colebrook. . . . . . 1862-63 

Oliver Pillsbury, Henniker 1862-64 

John W. Sanborn, Wakefield 1863-64 

Levi Parker, Lisbon 1863-64 

John W. Noyes, Chester 1863-65 

Charles H. Eastman, Claremont 1863-65 

John M. Brackett, Wolfeborough 1864-66 

Leonard Chase, Milford 1864-66 

David Culver, Lyme 1864-66 

Horton D. Walker, Portsmouth 1865-67 

John H. Elliott, Keene 1865-67 

Luther B. Hoskins, Lyman 1866-67 

Benjamin J. Cole, Gilford 1866-68 

Isaac Spalding, Nashua 1866-6 8 

William C. Patten, Kingston 1867-69 

William E. Tutherly, Claremont 1867-69 

Hazen Bedel, Colebrook 1867-69 

Charles Jones, Milton 1868-70 

Moses A. Hodgdon, Weare 1868-70 

Moses Humphrey, Concord 1869-71 

Samuel W. Hale, Keene 1869-71 

Nathan H. Weeks, Woodstock 1869-71 

Ezra Gould, Sandwich 1870-71 

Daniel Barnard, Franklin 1870-72 

David M. Clough, Canterbury 1871-72 

Alphonzo H. Rust, Wolfeborough 1871-72 

Dexter Richards, Newport 1871-73 

Joseph Powers, Haverhill 1871-73 

Samuel P. Dow, Epping 1872-74 

John J. Morrill, Gilford 1872-74 

William P. Newell, Manchester 1872-74 

Bolivar Lovell, Alstead 1873-75 

Nathan R. Perkins, Jefferson 1873-75 

John S. Robinson, Deerfield 1874-75 

John C. Moulton, Laconia 1874-75 

Albert McKean, Nashua 1874-75 

Edward D. Burnham, Hopkinton 1875-76 

Charles A. Foss, Barrington 1875-77 

Moulton H. Marston, Sandwich 1875-77 

Albert S. Scott, Peterborough 1875-77 

Jeremiah Blodgett, Wentworth 1875-76, 77-78 

Evarts W. Farr, Littleton 1876-77 

John M. Parker, Goffstown 1876-78 

Joshua B. Smith, Durham 1877-79 

Edward Spalding, Nashua * 1877-79 

Francis A. Cushman, Lebanon 1877-79 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 147 

Name and Residence. Term. 

[iram A. Tuttle, Pittsfleld 1878-81 

oseph Burrows, Plymouth 1878-81 

barren Brown, Hampton Palls 1879-81 

Jathan Parker, Manchester 1879-81 

ames Burnap, Marlow 1879-81 

'homas G. Jameson, Somersworth 18 81-83 

yman D. Stevens, Concord 1881-83 

ohn W. Wheeler, Salem 1881-83 

George H. Stowell, Claremont 18 81-83 

rthur L. Meserve, Bartlett 1881-83 

mos C. Chase, Kingston 1883-85 

rovenor A. Curtice, Hopkinton 1883-85 

ohn A. Spalding, Nashua 1883-85 

)avid H. Goodell, Antrim 1883-85 

)avid M. Aldrich, Whitefield 18 83-85 

Charles W. Talpey, Farmington 1885-87 

3enjamin A. Kimball, Concord 1885-87 

Mortimer L. Morrison, Peterborough 188 5-87 

D eter Upton, Jaffrey 1885-87 

Fohn W. Jewell, Strafford 1885-87 

Nathaniel H. Clark, Plaistow 1887-89 

rohn C. Linehan, Concord 1887-89 

Charles Williams, Manchester 1887-89 

Fohn B. Smith, Hillsborough 1887-89 

Albert S. Batchellor, Littleton 1887-89 

Charles H. Horton, Dover 1889-91 

Edward C. Shirley, Goffstown 1889-91 

tVilliam S. Pillsbury, Londonderry 1889-91 

frank C. Churchill, Lebanon 1889-91 

Sherburne R. Merrill, Colebrook 1889-91 

rames Farrington, Rochester 1891-93 

EEenry B. Quinby, Lake Village (Laconia) 1891-93 

>eorge A. Ramsdell, Nashua. 1891-93 

rohn M. Whipple, Claremont. 1891-93 

3dwin C. Lewis, Laconia 1891-9 3 

rrue L. Norris, Portsmouth 1893-95 

rohn C. Ray, Manchester 1893-95 

Sdward O. Blunt, Nashua., 1893-9 5 

frank N. Parsons, Franklin 1893-9 5 

Herbert B. Moulton, Lisbon 1893-9 5 

racob D. Young, Madbury 1895-97 

Edward H. Gilman, Exeter 189 5-9 7 

Francis C. Faulkner, Keene 189 5-97 

Francis P. Cheney, Ashland 189 5-97 

Mitchell H. Bowker, Whitefield 189 5-97 

roseph O. Hobbs, North Hampton 1897-99 

\llen N. Clapp, Manchester 1897-99 



148 NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 

Name and Residence. Term. 

George W. Cummings, Francestown 1897-99 

Walter S. Davis, Hopkinton 1897-99 

Charles F. Piper, Wolfeborough 189 7-9 9 

Sumner Wallace, Rochester 1899-1901 

Stephen H. Gale, Exeter 1899-19 01 

George F. Hammond, Nashua 1899-1901 

Harry M. Cheney, Lebanon 1899-1901 

Henry F. Green, Littleton 1899-1901 

James B. Tennant, Epsom 1901-03 

Loring B. Bodwell, Manchester 1901-03 

Charles H. Hersey, Keene 1901-03 

Edmund E. Truesdell, Pembroke 19 01-03 

Robert N. Chamberlin, Berlin 19 01-03 

James Frank Seavey, Dover 1903-05 

Alfred A. Collins, Danville 19 03-05 

Frank E. Kaley, Milford 1903-05 

Seth M. Richards, Newport 19 03-05 

A. Crosby Kennett, Conway 19 03-05 

Fred S. Towle, Portsmouth 1905-07 

Charles M. Floyd, Manchester 1905-07 

Joseph Woodbury Howard, Nashua 19 05-07 

Edward G. Leach, Franklin 1905-07 

Charles H. Greenleaf, Franconia 1905-07 

Stephen S. Jewett, Laconia 1907-09 

William H. C. Follansby, Exeter 1907-09 

Herbert B. Viall, Keene 1907-09 

James Duncan Upham, Claremont 1907-09 

Frank P. Brown, Whitefield 19 07-09 

Alonzo M. Foss, Dover 19 09-11 

Henry W. Boutwell, Manchester 1909-11 

Albert Annett, Jaffrey 1909-11 

James G. Fellows, Pembroke 1909-11 

Lyford A. Merrow, Ossipee 1909-11 

Thomas Entwistle, Portsmouth 1911-13 

Harry T. Lord, Manchester 1911-13 

Benjamin F. Greer, Goffstown 1911-13 

John M. Gile, Hanover 1911-13 

George H. Turner, Bethlehem 1911-13 

Daniel W. Badger, Portsmouth 1913-15 

Lewis G. Gilman, Manchester 1913-15 

Albert W. Noone, Peterborough 1913-15 

William H. Sawyer, Concord 1913-15* 

George W. McGregor, Littleton 1913-15 

James B. Wallace, Canaan 1915-17 

John Scammon, Exeter 1915-17 

John B. Cavanaugh, Manchester 1915-17 

Frank Huntress, Keene 1915-17 

Solon A. Carter, Concord 1915-17 



^Appointed, December 12, 1913, Associate Justice of the Superior Court. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 149 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

Articles 66, 67 and 68 of the second part of the constitution 
irovide for a department of state with a secretary of state who 
s elected biennially by the legislature and a deputy secretary 
)f state appointed by the secretary. In the colonial period there 
vas a secretary appointed by the chief executive, but no deputy. 
During the revolutionary period and under the constitution of 
1784 the secretary was chosen by the legislature and given 
authority to have several deputies, but in 1793 the constitution 
was changed to provide for a single deputy. 

The following is a list of the thirty-nine secretaries of state 
from the beginning, together with the term which each served 
ind a list of the thirty-five deputy secretaries. 

Secretaries of State. 

Name and Residence. Term Served. 

Elias Stileman, Portsmouth 1680 

Richard Chamberlain, Portsmouth 16? 0-9 2 

Thomas Newton, Boston, Mass 169 2-9 3 

Thomas Davis 1693-96 

Henry Penny 1696-97, 98 

Charles Story, Newcastle 1697-98, 99-1715 

Sampson Sheafe, Boston, Mass 1698-99 

Richard Waldron, Portsmouth 1715-30 

Richard Waldron, Jr., Portsmouth 1730-41 

Theodore Atkinson, Newcastle 1741-62, 69-75 

Theodore Atkinson, Jr., Portsmouth 1762-69 

Ebenezer Thompson, Durham 1775-86 

Joseph Pearson, Exeter 1786-1805 

Philip Carrigain, Concord 1805-09 

Nathaniel Parker, Exeter ! 1809-10 

Samuel Sparhawk, Concord 1810-14, 16-25 

Albe Cady, Keene and Concord 1814-16 

Richard Bartlett, Concord 182 5-28 

Dudley S. Palmer, Concord 1828-31 

Ralph Metcalf, Concord 1831-38 

Josiah Stevens, Jr., Concord 1838-43 

Thomas P. Treadwell, Concord 1843-46, 47-50 

George G. Fogg, Concord 1846-47 

John L. Hadley, Weare. 1850-55 

Lemuel N. Pattee, Antrim 1855-58 

Thomas L. Tullock, Portsmouth 1858-61 

Allen Tenny, Lyme 1861-6 5 

Benjamin Gerrish, Jr., Concord 1865 

Walter Harriman, Warner 1865-67 

John D. Lyman, Parmington 1867-70 



150 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Name and Residence. Term Served. 

Nathan W. Gove, Concord 1870-71 

John H. Goodale, Nashua 1871-72 

Benjamin F. Prescott, Epping 1872-74, 75-77 

William Butterfield, Concord 1874-75 

Ai B. Thompson, Concord 1877-90 

Clarence B. Randlett, Concord 189 0-91 

Ezra S. Stearns, Rindge 1891-99 

Edward N. Pearson, Concord 1899-1915 

Edwin C. Bean, Belmont 1915- 

Deputy Secretaries of State. 

Nathaniel Parker, Concord 1794-1806 

Charles Cutts, Concord 1806-07 

Obadiah Carrigain, Concord 1807-09 

Moses H. Bradley, Concord 1809-10 

William Pickering, Portsmouth 1810-14 

Samuel A. Kimball, Concord 1814-16, 24-25 

Peyton R. Freeman, Concord 1816-18 

Richard Bartlett, Concord 1818-24 

Dudley S. Palmer, Concord 1825-27 

James Wilcomb, Concord 1827-29 

Joseph Robinson, Concord 1829-36 

Simon Brown, Concord 1836-38 

John Whipple, Concord 1838-40 

John Town, Concord. . . 1840-44 

Henry T. Rand, Portsmouth 1844-46 

Samuel F. Wetmore, Concord 1846-47 

William C. Prescott, Concord 1847-50 

Jesse A. Gove, Concord 1850-55 

Benjamin E. Badger, Concord 1855-56 

James Peverly, Concord 18 56-57 

Nathan W. Gove, Concord 1857-58, 65-70 

Allen Tenney, Lyme 18 58-61 

George H. Chandler, Concord 1861-62 

Benjamin Gerrish, Jr., Concord 1862-65 

James B. Gove, Concord 1870-71 

Jonathan E. Lang, Concord 1871-72 

Ai B. Thompson, Concord 1872-74, 75-77 

Harvey Campbell, Concord 1874-75 

Isaac W. Hammond, Concord 1877-86 

Darius Merrill, Concord 1886-90 

Clarence B. Randlett, Concord 1890-91 

Samuel H. Stearns, Rindge 1892-1906 

Joseph T. Walker, Concord 1906-07 

Arthur L. Willis, Concord 1907-15 

Hobart Pillsbury, Manchester 1915- 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 151 



THE TREASURY. 

Article 66 of the second part of the constitution provides for 
i treasurer who is elected biennially by the legislature. In the 
olonial period the treasurer was appointed by the chief execu- 
tive and frequently the same man was secretary of the province 
ind treasurer. In 1891 the legislature created the office of 
leputy treasurer. 

The following is a list of the twenty-eight treasurers from the 
beginning and the term of office each served. A list of the four 
leputy treasurers is also given with the residence and term 
served by each. 

Treasurers. 

Name and Residence. Term Served. 

Richard Martin, Portsmouth 1680-84 

Samuel Penhallow, Portsmouth 1684-92, 99-1726 

William Partridge, Portsmouth 169 2-9 5 

George Jaffrey, Portsmouth 169 5-9 6 

Joseph Smith, Hampton 1696, 98-99 

William Vaughan, Portsmouth 16 96-9 8 

George Jaffrey, Jr., Portsmouth 1726-30, 42-49 

Henry Sherburne, Portsmouth 1730-42 

George Jaffrey, 3d, Portsmouth 1749-76 

Nicholas Gilman, Exeter 1776-83 

John T. Gilman, Exeter 1783-89, 91-94 

William Gardner, Portsmouth 1789-91 

Oliver Peabody, Exeter 179 4-1804 

Nathaniel Gilman, Exeter 1804-09, 10-14 

Thomas W. Thompson, Salisbury 1809-10 

William Kent, Concord 1814-16 

William Pickering, Concord....; 1816-28, 29-30 

Samuel Morrill, Concord 1828-29 

Abner B. Kelly, Warner 1830-37 

Zenas Clement, Concord 1837-43 

John Atwood, Concord 1843-46, 47-50 

James Peverly, Jr., Concord 1846-47 

Edson Hill, Concord 1850-53 

Walter Harriman, Warner 18 53-55 

William Berry, Barnstead 1855-57 

Peter Sanborn, Concord 18 57-71 

Leander W. Cogswell 1871-72 

Solon A. Carter, Concord 1872-74, 75-1913 

Josiah G. Dearborn, Weare 1874-75 

George E. Farrand, Concord 1913-14 

J. Wesley Plummer, Concord 1914- 



152 NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 

Deputy Treasurers 

Name and Residence. Term Served. 

Hiram F. Gerrish, Concord 189 2-9 9 

Algernon Willis, Concord 1899-1901 

J. Wesley Plummer, Concord 19 02-14 

Henry M. Short, Concord 1915- 

THE MILITIA. 

The constitution vests all military authority in the governor, 
who is by virtue of his office commander-in-chief of the militia 
or national guard. He appoints an adjutant-general as his 
chief of staff and active head of the military establishment, and 
the office carries with it the rank of brigadier-general. The 
following is a list of the adjutant-generals from the beginning, 
together with their places of residence and the term of service 
of each. 

Name and Residence. Term Served. 

Nathaniel Peabody, Exeter 1777-84 

Michael McClary, Epsom 1784-1813 

Benjamin Butler, Deerfield 1813-20 

Joseph Low, Amherst 182 0-39 

Charles H. Peaslee, Concord 1839-47 

John Wadleigh, Meredith 1847-55 

Joseph C. Abbott, Concord 1855-61 

Anthony Colby, New London 1861-63 

Daniel E. Colby, New London 1863-64 

Natt Head, Hooksett 1864-70 

John M. Haines, Concord 1870-74 

Andrew J. Edgerly, Haverhill 1874-76 

Ira Cross, Manchester 1876-79 

Augustus D. Ayling, Concord 1879-1907 

Harry B. Cilley, Manchester 19 07-11 

Herbert E. Tutherly, Claremont 1911-15 

Charles W. Howard, Nashua 1915- 

THE LEGISLATURE. 

Part second of the constitution provides for a legislature to 
be known as the "general court," to consist of a senate and house 
of representatives. Before the constitution was made there 
was a legislature, before the legislature a colonial house of 
representatives, and before that a provincial congress or con- 
vention. 

Up to 1917 there have been, counting the colonial legislatures, 
just two hundred sessions of the New Hampshire legislature. 
These have taken place at intervals of not more than two years 
between any two sessions during a period of one hundred and 
forty years. The following list gives the date when each session 
began, the date it adjourned, the number of days it lasted and 
the place it met in. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 
Provincial Congress or Conventions. 



153 



Commenced. 


Adjourned. 


No. Days. 


Where held. 


April 21, 1775 
May 17, 1775 
Oct. 31, 1775 


May — , 1775 
Sept. 2, 1775 
Nov. 16, 1775 


io9 

17 


Exeter. 
Exeter. 
Exeter. 



House of Representatives for the Colony. 



Commenced. 


Dec. 


21, 


1775 


Jan. 


6, 


1776 


March 


6, 


1776 


June 


■ r >, 


1776 


Sept. 


4, 


1776 



Adjourned. 



Jan. 
Jan. 
March 
July 

Sept. 



5, 1776 
27, 1776 
23, 1776 

6, 1776 
20, 1776 



No. Days. 



Where held. 



Exeter. 
Exeter. 
Exeter. 
Exeter. 
Exeter. 



Sessions of the State Legislature. 



Commenced. 


Adjourned. 


No. Days. 


Where held. 




Oct. 16, 1776 


Oct. 


19, 1776 


4 


Exeter. 




Nov. 27, 1776 


Dec. 


13, 1776 


17 


Exeter. 




Dec. 18, 1776 


Jan. 


18, 1777 


32 


Exeter. 




March 12, 1777 


April 


12, 1777 


32 


Exeter. 




June 4, 1777 


June 


28, 1777 


25 


Portsmouth. 




July 17, 1777 


July 


19, 1777 


3 


Exeter. 




Sept. 17, 1777 


Sept. 


27, 1777 


11 


Exeter. 




Nov. 5, 1777 


Nov. 


29, 1777 i 


25 


Exeter. 




Dec. 17, 1777 


Jan. 


3, 1778 


18 


Exeter. 




Feb. 11, 1778 


March 


14, 1778 


32 


Exeter. 




May 20, 1778 


May 


23, 1778 


4 


Exeter. 




Aug. 12, 1778 


Aug. 


22, 1778 


11 


Exeter. 




Oct. 28, 1778 


Nov. 


28, 1778 


32 


Exeter. 




Dec. 16, 1778 


Dec. 


26, 1778 


11 


Exeter. 




March 10, 1779 


April 


3, 1779 


25 


Exeter. 




June 16, 1779 


June 


26, 1779 


11 


Exeter. 




Oct. 20, 1779 


Nov. 


19, 1779 


31 


Exeter. 




Dec. 15, 1779 


Jan. 


1, 1780 


17 


Exeter. 




Feb. 9, 1780 


March 


18, 1780 


39 


Exeter. 




April 19, 1780 


April 


29, 1780 


11 


Exeter. 




June 7, 1780 


June 


29, 1780 


23 


Exptpr. 




Oct. 11, 1780 


Nov. 


11, 1780 


32 


Portsmouth. 




Dec. 20, 1780 


Jan. 


27, 1781 


39 


Exeter. 




March 14, 1781 


April 


7, 1781 


25 


Exeter. 




June 13, 1781 


July 


4, 1781 


22 


Exeter. 




Aug. 22, 1781 


Sept. 


1. 17S1 


11 


Exeter. 





154 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 
Sessions of the State Legislature. — Continued. 



Commenced. 


Adjourned. 


No. Days. 


Where held. 


Nov. 


7, 1781 


Nov. 


29, 1781 


23 


Exeter. 


Dec. 


19, 1781 


Jan. 


18, 1782 


31 


Exeter. 


March 


13, 1782 


March 


27, 1782 


15 


Concord. 


June 


11, 1782 


June 


27, 1782 


17 


Concord. 


Sept. 


10, 1782 


Sept. 


14, 1782 


5 


Concord. 


Nov. 


12, 1782 


Nov. 


23, 1782 


12 


Exeter. 


Dec. 


18, 1782 


Dec. 


28, 1782 


11 


Portsmouth. 


Feb. 


12, 1783 


March 


1, 1783 


18 


Exeter. 


June 


10, 1783 


June 


21, 1783 


12 


Concord. 


Oct. 


28, 1783 


Nov. 


8, 1783 


12 


Concord. 


Dec. 


17, 1783 


Jan. 


3, 1784 


18 


Concord. 


March 


30, 1784 


April 


17, 1784 


19 


Exeter. 


June 


2, 1784 


June 


15, 1784 


14 


Concord. 


Oct. 


20, 1784 


Nov. 


11, 1784 


21 


Portsmouth. 


Feb. 


9, 1785 


Feb. 


25, 1785 


17 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1785 


June 


24, 1785 


24 


Portsmouth. 


Oct. 


19, 1785 


Nov. 


10, 1785 


23 


Concord. 


Feb. 


1, 1786 


March 


4, 1786 


32 


Portsmouth. 


June 


7, 1786 


June 


27, 1786 


21 


Concord. 


Sept. 


6, 1786 


Sept. 


23, 1786 


18 


Exeter. 


Dec. 


13, 1786 


Jan. 


18, 1787 


37 


Portsmouth. 


June 


6, 1787 


June 


30, 1787 


25 


Concord. 


Sept. 


12, 1787 


Sept. 


29, 1787 


18 


Charlestown. 


Dec. 


5, 1787 


Dec. 


15, 1787 


11 


Portsmouth. 


Jan. 


23, 1788 


Feb. 


13, 1788 


22 


Portsmouth. 


June 


4, 1788 


June 


18, 1788 


15 


Concord. 


Nov. 


5, 1788 


Nov. 


13, 1788 


9 


Concord. 


Dec. 


24, 1788 


Feb. 


7, 1789 


46 


Exeter. 


June 


3, 1789 


June 


19, 1789 


17 


Concord. 


Dec. 


23, 1789 


Jan. 


26, 1790 


35 


Portsmouth. 


June 


2, 1790 


June 


19, 1790 


18 


Concord. 


Jan. 


5, 1791 


June 


17, 1791 


17 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1791 


Jan. 


6, 1792 


38 


Concord. 


Nov. 


30, 1791 


June 


22, 1792 


17 


Portsmouth. 


■June 


6, 1792 


Dec. 


28, 1792 


38 


Dover. 


Nov. 


21, 1792 


Feb. 


22, 1794 


60 


Exeter. 


June 


5, 1793 


June 


21, 1793 


17 


Concord. 


Dec. 


25, 1793 


Feb. 


18, 1791 


45 


Exeter. 


June 


4, 1794 


June 


21, 1794 


18 


Amherst. 


Dec. 


16, 1794 


Jan. 


16, 1795 


32 


Concord. 


June 


3, 1795 


June 


18, 1795 


16 


Hanover. 


Dec. 


2, 1795 


Jan. 


1, 1796 


31 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1796 


June 


17, 1796 


17 


Exeter. 


Nov. 


23, 1796 


Dec. 


16, 1796 


24 


Concord. 


June 


7, 1797 


June 


22, 1797 


16 


Concord. 


Nov. 


22, 1797 


Dec. 


21, 1797 


30 


Portsmouth. 


June 


6, 1798 


June 


20, 1798 


15 


Hopkinton. 


Nov. 


21, 1798 


Dec. 


28, 1798 


38 


Concord. 


June 


5, 1799 


June 


15, 1799 


11 


Concord. 


Dec. 


4, 1799 


Dec. 


31, 1799 


28 


Exeter. 


June 


4, 1800 


June 


16, 1800 


13 


Concord. 


Nov. 


19, 1800 


Dec. 


10, 1800 


22 


Concord. 


June 


3, 1801 


June 


17, 1801 


15 


Hopkinton. 


June 


2, 1802 


June 


18, 1802 


17 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1803 


June 


11, 1803 


11 


Concord. 


Nov. 


23, 1803 


Dec. 


30, 1803 


38 


Concord. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 
Sessions of the State Legislature. — Continued. 



155 



Commenced. 


Adjourned. 


No. Days. 


Where held. 


June 


6, 1804 


June 


21, 1804 


16 


Concord. 


Nov. 


21, 1804 


Dec. 


14, 1804 


24 


Concord. 


June 


5, 1805 


June 


19, 1805 


15 


Portsmouth. 


Dec. 


4, 1805 


Dec. 


31, 1805 


28 


Hopkinton. 


June 


4, 1806 


June 


20, 1806 


17 


Hopkinton. 


June 


3, 1807 


June 


19, 1807 


17 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1808 


June 


14, 1808 


14 


Concord. 


Nov. 


23, 1808 


Dec. 


23, 1808 


31 


Concord. 


June 


7, 1809 


June 


28, 1809 


22 


Concord. 


June 


6, 1810 


June 


27, 1810 


22 


Concord. 


June 


5, 1811 


June 


21, 1811 


17 


Concord. 


June 


3, 1812 


June 


19, 1812 


17 


Concord. 


Nov. 


18, 1812 


Dec. 


18, 1812 


31 


Concord. 


June 


2, 1813 


June 


24, 1813 


20 


Concord. 


Oct. 


27, 1813 


Nov. 


5, 1813 


13 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1814 


June 


24, 1814 


24 


Concord. 


June 


7, 1815 


June 


29, 1815 


23 


Concord. 


June 


5, 1816 


June 


29, 1816 


25 


Concord. 


Nov. 


20. 1816 


Dec. 


27, 1816 


38 


Concord. 


June 


4, 1817 


June 


28, 1817 


25 


Concord. 


June 


3, 1818 


June 


30, 1818 


28 


Concord. 


June 


2, 1819 


July 


2, 1819 


31 


Concord. 


June 


7, 1820 


June 


23, 1820 


17 


Concord. 


Nov. 


15, 1820 


Dec. 


23, 1820 


39 


Concord. 


June 


6, 1821 


June 


30, 1821 


25 


Concord. 


June 


5, 1822 


July 


4, 1822 


30 


Concord. 


June 


4, 1823 


July 


3, 1823 


30 


Concord. 


June 


2, 1824 


June 


16, 1824 


15 


Concord. 


Nov. 


17, 1824 


Dec. 


22, 1824 


36 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1825 


July 


2, 1825 


32 


Concord. 


June 


7, 1826 


July 


8, 1826 


32 


Concord. 


June 


6, 1827 


July 


7, 1827 


32 


Concord. 


June 


4, 1828 


June 


19, 1828 


16 


Concord. 


Nov. 


19, 1828 


Jan. 


3, 1829 


46 


Concord. 


June 


3, 1829 


July 


4, 1829 


32 


Concord. 


June 


2, 1830 


July 


3, 1830 


32 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1831 


July 


2, 1831 


32 


Concord. 


June 


6, 1832 


June 


23, 1832 


18 


Concord. 


Nov. 


21, 1832 


Jan. 


5, 1833 


46 


Concord. 


June 


5, 1833 


July 


6, 1833 


32 


Concord. 


June 


4, 1834 


July 


5, 1834 


32 


Concord. 


June 


3, 1835 


June 


27, 1835 


25 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1836 


June 


18, 1836 


18 


Concord. 


Nov. 


23, 1836 


Jan. 


14, 1837 


53 


Concord. 


June 


7. 1837 


July 


8, 1837 


32 


Concord. 


June 


6, 1838 


July 


5, 1838 


30 


Concord. 


June 


5, 1839 


July 


6, 1839 


32 


Concord. 


June 


3, 1840 


June 


20, 1840 


20 


Concord. 


Nov. 


18, 1840 


Dec. 


24, 1840 


37 


Concord. 


June 


2, 1841 


July 


3, 1841 


32 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1842 


June 


24, 1842 


24 


Concord. 


Nov. 


2, 1842 


Dec. 


23, 1842 


52 


Concord. 


June 


7, 1843 


July 


1, 1843 


25 


Concord. 


June 


5. 1844 


June 


19, 1844 


15 


Concord. 


Nov. 


20, 1844 


Dec. 


28, 1844 


39 


Concord. 


June 


4. 1845 


July 


3, 1845 


30 


Concord. 


June 


3, 1846 


July 


10, 1846 


38 


Concord. 



156 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Sessions of the State Legislature. — Concluded. 



Commenced. 


Adjourned. 


No. Days. 


Where held. 


June 


2, 1847 


July- 


3, 1847 


32 


Concord. 


June 


7, 1848 


June 


24, 1848 


18 


Concord. 


Nov. 


22, 1848 


Jan. 


4, 1849 


44 


Concord. 


June 


6, 1849 


July 


7, 1849 


32 


Concord. 


June 


5, 1850 


July 


13, 1850 


39 


Concord. 


June 


4, 1851 


July 


5, 1851 


32 


Concord. 


June 


2, 1852 


June 


19, 1852 


18 


Concord. 


Nov. 


17, 1852 


Jan. 


8, 1853 


53 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1853 


July 


2, 1853 


32 


Concord. 


June 


7, 1854 


July 


15, 1854 


39 


Concord. 


June 


6, 1855 


July 


14, 1855 


39 


Concord. 


June 


4, 1856 


July 


12, 1856 


39 


Concord. 


June 


3, 1857 


June 


27, 1857 


25 


Concord. 


June 


2, 1858 


June 


26, 1858 


25 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1859 


June 


28, 1859 


28 


Concord. 


June 


6, 1860 


July 


4, 1860 


29 


Concord. 


June 


5, 1861 


July 


4, 1861 


30 


Concord. 


June 


4, 1862 


July 


10, 1862 


37 


Concord. 


June 


3, 1863 


July 


10, 1863 


38 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1864 


July 


16, 1864 


46 


Concord. 


Aug. 


9, 1864 


Sept. 


1, 1864 


24 


Concord. 


June 


7, 1865 


July 


1, 1865 


25 


Concord. 


June 


6, 1866 


July 


7, 1866 


32 


Concord. 


June 


5, 1867 


July 


6, 1867 


32 


Concord. 


June 


3, 1868 


July 


4, 1868 


32 


Concord. 


June 


2, 1869 


July 


9, 1869 


38 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1870 


July 


2, 1870 


32 


Concord. 


June 


7, 1871 


July 


15, 1871 


39 


Concord. 


June 


5, 1872 


July 


4, 1872 


30 


Concord. 


June 


4, 1873 


July 


3, 1873 


30 


Concord. 


June 


3, 1874 


July 


10, 1874 


38 


Concord. 


June 


2. 1875 


July 


3, 1875 


32 


Concord. 


June 


7, 1876 


July 


21, 1876 


45 


Concord. 


Jun« 


6. 1877 


July 


19, 1877 


44 


Concord. 


June 


5. 1878 


Aug. 


17, 1878 


74 


Concord. 


June 


4, 1879 


July 


19, 1879 


46 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1881 


Aug. 


19, 1881 


80 


Concord. 


June 


6. 1883 


Sept. 


15, 1883 


102 


Concord. 


June 


3, 1885 


Aug. 


29, 1885 


88 


Concord. 


June 


1, 1887 


Nov. 


5, 1887 


158 


Concord. 


June 


5. 1889 


Aug. 


16, 1889 


73 


Concord. 


Dec. 


2, 1890 


Dec. 


5, 1890 


3 


Concord. 


Jan. 


7, 1891 


April 


11, 1891 


94 


Concord. 


Jan. 


4, 1893 


April 


1, 1893 


87 


Concord. 


Jan. 


2. 1895 


March 


29, 1895 


86 


Concord. 


Jan. 


6, 1897 


March 


26, 1897 


79 


Concord. 


Jan. 


4. 1899 


March 


11, 1899 


66 


Concord. 


Jan. 


2. 1901 


March 


22, 1901 


79 


Concord. 


Jan. 


7. 1903 


April 


2, 1903 


85 


Concord. 


Jan. 


4. 1905 


March 


10, 1905 


65 


Concord. 


Jan. 


2. 1907 


April 


5, 1907 


93 


Concord. 


Jan. 


6, 1909 


April 


9, 1909 


93 


Concord. 


Jan. 


4, 1911 


April 


15, 1911 


101 


Concord. 


Jan. 


1, 1913 


May 


21, 1913 


141 


Concord. 


Jan. 


6, 1915 


April 


21, 1915 


105 


Concord. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



157 



THE SENATE. 

The senate began under the constitution and first met in 1784. There 
ere at first twelve senators who represented the five counties that then 
isted, five senators from Rockingham county, two from Strafford, two from 
illsborough, two from Cheshire and one from Grafton. In 1793 senatorial 
stricts were created to take the place of county representation and each 
strict elected one senator. The elections during the early years took place 

March and the legislature met in June annually. 

The senatorial districting of 1793 was changed over in 1803 and several 
nes subsequently. In 1878 the senate was doubled in size. In 1915 the 
nators were elected by plurality instead of majority vote. The following 

a complete list of the senators from the beginning, showing the name 
id residence of each member of each senate, arranged in the order of dis- 
cts from 1793, when the districts were created, and previous to that year, 

the order of counties. 

1784-85. 

oodbury Langdon Portsmouth Ebenezer Smith Meredith 

hn Langdon Portsmouth Francis Blood Temple 

seph Gilman Exeter Matthew Thornton Merrimack 

hn McClary Epsom Simeon Olcott Charlestown 

mothy Walker Concord Enoch Hale Rindge 

hn Wentworth Dover Moses Dow Haverhill 

Senator Langdon was elected in place of John Dudley of Raymond, who 
clined, and Senator Hale in place of Benjamin Bellows of Walpole, who 
clined. 

1785-86. 

ishua Wentworth Portsmouth Otis Baker Dover 

sorge Atkinson Portsmouth Matthew Thornton Merrimack 

ihn McClary Epsom Ebenezer Webster Salisbury 

•seph Gilman Exeter Moses iChase Cornish 

athaniel Peabody Atkinson John Bellows Walpole 

»hn Wentworth Dover Francis Worcester Plymouth 

John Langdon, Portsmouth, was elected, but resigned. Joshua Wentworth 
as chosen in convention, June 9, to fill the vacancy. 

1786-87. 

•hn McClary Epsom Otis Baker Dover 

iseph Gilman Exeter Matthew Thornton Merrimack 

ishua Wentworth Portsmouth Ebenezer Webster Salisbury 

?orge Atkinson Portsmouth John Bellows Walpole 

ihn Bell, Jr Londonderry Amos Shepard Alstead 

hn McDuffee Rochester Elisha Payne Lebanon 



1787-88. 

eorge Atkinson Portsmouth Ebenezer Thompson Durham 

iseph Gilman Exeter Robert Means Amherst 

ihn Bell, Jr Londonderry Joshua Bailey Hopkinton 

iter Green Concord John Bellows Walpole 

ishua Wentworth Portsmouth Amos Shepard Alstead 

benezer Smith Meredith Elisha Payne Lebanon 



158 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



1788-89. 

John Pickering Portsmouth John Waldron Dover 

Pierce Long Portsmouth Robert Wallace Henniker 

Christopher Toppan Hampton Ebenezer Webster Salisbury 

John Bell, Jr Londonderry Amos Shepard.. Alstead 

Joshua Wentworth Portsmouth Moses Chase Cornish 

Ebenezer Smith Meredith Francis Worcester Plymouth 

1789-90. 

John Pickering Portsmouth Ebenezer Smith Meredith 

John Bell, Jr Londonderry Robert Means Amherst 

Peter Green Concord Robert Wallace Henniker 

Christopher Toppan Hampton Amos Shepard Alstead 

Nathaniel Rogers Newmarket John Hubbard Charlestown 

John McDuff ee Rochester Jonathan Freeman Hanover 

1790-91. 

Joseph Cilley Nottingham Ebenezer Smith Meredith 

Nathaniel Peabody Atkinson Ebenezer Webster Salisbury 

Peter Green Concord Robert Wallace Henniker 

Oliver Peabody Exeter Amos Shepard Alstead 

Nathaniel Rogers Newmarket Sanford Kingsbury Claremont 

John Waldron Dover Jonathan Freeman Hanover 

Senator Peabody was appointed a probate judge and resigned. Christopher 
Toppan of Hampton was elected to succeed him but declined, and John Bell 
of Londonderry was then elected for a fifth consecutive term. 

1791-92. 

Nathaniel Rogers Newmarket Samuel Hale Barrington 

James Sheaf e Portsmouth Robert Wallace Henniker 

Christopher Toppan Hampton Robert Means Amherst 

Nathaniel Peabody Atkinson iSanford Kingsbury Claremont 

Abiel Foster Canterbury William Page Charlestown 

John Waldron Dover Moses Dow Haverhill 

Senator Foster was elected to succeed John T. Gilman of Exeter, who had 
been elected senator and then treasurer and resigned his senatorship. 
Senator Means resigned and Charles Barrett of New Ipswich was elected to 
succeed him. 

1792-93. 

Abiel Foster Canterbury Ebenezer Smith Meredith 

James Sheaf e Portsmouth Robert Wallace Henniker 

Nathaniel Peabody Atkinson Joshua Atherton Amherst 

Christopher Toppan , Hampton Amos Shepard Alstead 

Nathaniel Gilman Exeter John Bellows Walpole 

John Waldron Dover Jonathan Freeman Hanover 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 159 



1793-94. 

iver Peabody Exeter Christopher Toppan Hampton 

aiel Foster Canterbury James Macgregore Londonderry 

jenezer Smith Meredith Samuel Hale Barrington 

shua Atherton Amherst Henry Gerrish Boscawen 

tarles Barrett New Ipswich Elisha Whitcomb Swanzey 

hn Bellows Walpole Jonathan Freeman Hanover 

1794-95. 

oses Leavitt North Hampton William Gordon Amherst 

iver Peabody Exeter James Flanders Warner 

seph Blanchard Chester Charles Barrett New Ipswich 

Diel Foster Canterbury Elisha Whitcomb Swanzey 

,muel Hale Barrington John Bellows Walpole 

>enezer Smith Meredith Moses Baker Campton 

Senators Peabody and Hale resigned and Phillips White of Exeter and 
ihn Waldron o'f Dover were elected to succeed them, but Mr. White de- 
ined. 

1795-96. 

oses Leavitt North Hampton William Gordon Amherst 

ithaniel Gilman Exeter James Flanders Warner 

seph Blanchard Chester Ephraim Hartwell New Ipswich 

iseph Cilley Nottingham Elisha Whitcomb Swanzey 

ihn McDuffee Rochester Amos Shepard Alstead 

benezer Smith Meredith Moses Baker Campton 

Senator Gordon resigned and Daniel Emerson of Hollis was elected to 
lcceed him. 

1796-97. 

oses Leavitt North Hampton Timothy Taylor Merrimack 

sremiah Fogg Kensington James Flanders Warner 

tseph Blanchard Chester Ephraim Hartwell New Ipswich 

ichael McClary Epsom Elisha Whitcomb Swanzey 

ihn McDuffee Rochester Amos Shepard Alstead 

benezer Smith Meredith Moses Baker Campton 

1797-98. 

oses Leavitt North Hampton John Orr Bedford 

remiah Fogg Kensington James Flanders Warner 

iseph Blanchard Chester John Duncan Antrim 

ichael McClary Epsom Elisha Whitcomb Swanzey 

illiam Hale Dover Amos Shepard Alstead 

ithan Hoit Moultonborough Moses Baker Campton 



160 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



1798-99. 

Moses Leavitt North Hampton John Orr Bedford 

Jeremiah Fogg Kensington James Flanders Warner 

Joseph Blanchard 'Chester Ephraim Hartwell New Ipswich 

Michael McClary Epsom Elisha Whitcomb Swanzey 

William Hale Dover Amos Shepard A 1 stead 

Nathan Hoit Moultonborough Moses Baker Campton 

1799-1800. 

Moses Leavitt North Hampton John Orr Bedford 

Jeremiah Fogg Kensington Henry Gerrish Boscawen 

Joseph Blanchard Chester Ephraim Hartwell New Ipswich 

Michael McClary Epsom Elisha Whitcomb Swanzey 

William Hale Dover Amos Shepard Alstead 

Nathan Hoit Moultonborough Moses Baker Campton 

Senators Leavitt and Hoit were unseated and James Sheaf e of Ports- 
mouth and Nathan Taylor of Sanborn ton were elected to succeed them. 

1800-01. 

Moses Leavitt North Hampton John Orr Bedford 

Jeremiah Fogg Kensington James Flanders Warner 



Silas Betton Salem 

Michael McClary Epsom 



Ephraim Hartwell New Ipswich 

Daniel Newcomb Keene 



William Hale Dover Amos Shepard Alstead 

Nathan Taylor Sanbornton John Mooney ....Meredith 

Senator Newcomb resigned and Elisha Whitcomb of Swanzey was elected 
to succeed him. 

1801-02. 



John Goddard Portsmouth John Orr Bedford 

Jeremiah Fogg Kensington James Flanders Warner 



Silas Betton Salem 

Michael McClary 

John McDuffee 



Ephraim Hartwell New Ipswich 

— Epsom Elisha Whitcomb Swanzey 

Rochester Amos Shepard Alstead 



Nathan Taylor Sanbornton Moore Russell Plymouth 

1802-03. 

John Goddard Portsmouth John Orr Bedford 

Nathaniel Gilman Exeter James Flanders Warner 

Silas Betton Salem Seth Payson Rindge 

James H. McClary Epsom Ezra Pierce Westmoreland 

John McDuffee Rochester Amos Shepard Alstead 

Nathan Taylor Sanbornton Moore Russell Plymouth 

Senator James H. McClary was elected to succeed Michael McClary of 
Epsom, who was elected but declined. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



161 



1803-04. 

Clement Storer Portsmouth John Orr Bedford 

Ezekiel Godfrey Poplin James Flanders Warner 

John Bell, Jr Londonderry Seth Payson Rindge 

Richard Jenness Deerfield Ezra Pierce Westmoreland 

John Waldron Dover Amos Shepard Alstead 

Nathan Taylor Sanbornton Moore Russell Plymouth 

1804-05. 



Clement iStorer Portsmouth Jedediah K. Smith Amherst 

Nicholas Gilman Exeter Robert Alcock Deering 

John Orr Bedford Seth Payson Rindge 

John Bradley Concord Amasa Allen Walpole 

John Waldron Dover Daniel Kimball Plainfield 

Nathan Taylor Sanbornton Moses P. Payson Bath 



In 1803 an act was passed making a change in the senatorial districts,— the 
law to take effect in 1804. 

1805-06. 

Element Storer Portsmouth Jedediah K. Smith Amherst 

ilichard Jenness Deerfield Robert Alcock Deering 

Tohn Orr Bedford Daniel Newcomb Keene 

Ibhn Bradley Concord George Aldrich Westmoreland 

Tohn Waldron Dover Daniel Kimball Plainfield 

Nathaniel Shannon .. .MouHonborough Moses P. Payson Bath 

1806-07. 

Element Storer Portsmouth Jedediah K. Smith Amherst 

tenj. Barnard South Hampton Robert Alcock Deering 

Villiam White Chester Lockhart Willard Keene 

ohn Bradley Concord George Aldrich Westmoreland 

ohn Waldron Dover Daniel Kimball Plainfield 

lathaniel Shannon .. .Moultonborough Peter Carlton Landaff 



1807-08. 



lijah Hall Portsmouth 

enj. Barnard South Hampton 

William White Chester 

Dhn Bradley Concord 

ichard Dame Rochester 

athaniel Shannon . . .Moultonborough 



Samuel Bell Francestown 

Robert Alcock Deering 

Lockhart Willard Keene 

George Aldrich Westmoreland 

John Fairfield Lyme 

Moses P. Payson Bath 



162 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



1808-09. 

Elijah Hall Ports-mouth Samuel Bell Francestown 

Richard Jenness Deerfield Joshua Darling Henniker 

William White Chester Lockhart Willard Keene 

John Bradley Concord George Aldrich Westmoreland 

Richard Dame Rochester John Fairfield Lyme 

Nathaniel Shannon .. .Moultonborough Moses 'P. Payson Bath 

1809-10. 

Josiah Bartlett Stratham Jedediah K. Smith Amherst 

Henry Butler Nottingham Joshua Darling Henniker 

William Adams Londonderry Lockhart Willard Keene 

Wm. Austin Kent Concord Roger Vose Walpole 

Beard Plumer Milton John Fairfield Lyme 

Samuel Shepard Gilmanton Moses P. Payson Bath 

1810-11. 

Josiah Bartlett Stratham William Fisk Amherst 

William Plumer Epping Joshua Darling Henniker 

William Adams Londonderry Lockhart Willard Keene 

Josiah Sanborn Epsom Roger Vose ...Walpole 

Beard Plumer Milton John Fairfield Lyme 

Samuel Quarles Ossipee Moore Russell Plymouth 

1811-12. 

William Ham, Jr Portsmouth William Fisk Amherst 

William Plumer Epping Joshua Darling Henniker 

William Adams Londonderry Joshua Wilder Rindge 

Josiah Sanborn Epsom Thomas C. Drew Walpole 

Beard Plumer Milton Caleb Ellis Claremont 

Samuel Quarles Ossipee Moore Russell Plymouth 

1812-13 

William Ham Portsmouth William Fisk Amherst 

Simeon Folsom Exeter Joshua Darling Henniker 

William Adams Londonderry Levi Jackson Chesterfield 

Josiah Sanborn Epsom Roger Vose Walpole 

Beard Plumer Milton Daniel Kimball Plainfield 

Samuel Quarles Ossipee Moore Russell Plymouth 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



163 



1813-14. 

William Ham Portsmouth William Fisk Amherst 

Oliver Peabody Exeter Joshua Darling Henniker 

William Adams Londonderry Levi Jackson Chesterfield 

William A. Kent Concord Josiah Bellows Walpole 

Jonas C. March Rochester Daniel Kimball Plainfield 

Samuel Shepard Gilmanton Moses P. Payson Bath 

Senator Peabody resigned and Simeon Folsom of Exeter was reelected to 
succeed him. 

1814-15. 

William Ham Portsmouth James Wallace Milford 

George Sullivan Exeter Joshua Darling Henniker 

Amos Kent Chester Levi Jackson Chesterfield 

William A. Kent Concord George B. Upham Claremont 

Jonas C. March Rochester Daniel Blaisdell Canaan 

William Badger Gilmanton Moses P. Payson Bath 

1815-16. 

William Ham Portsmouth James Wallace Milford 

George Sullivan Exeter Joshua Darling Henniker 

Amos Kent Chester Levi Jackson Chesterfield 

Ezekiel Webster Boscawen Samuel Fiske Claremont 

Jonas C. March .'..Rochester Daniel Blaisdell Canaan 

William Badger Gilmanton Moses P. Payson Bath 



1816-47. 



William Ham Portsmouth 

oseph Shepard Eppimg 

Tohn Vose Atkinson 

Tohn Harvey Northwood James H. Bingham 



James Wallace Milford 

Jonathan Harvey Sutton 

Phifleas Handerson Chesterfield 

Alstead 



3eard Plumer Milton 

iVilliam Badger Gilmanton 



John Durkee Hanover 

Dan Young Lisbon 



Before the fall session, District No. 5 was vacated by the decease of Sen- 
itor Plumer, and No. 6 by the appointment of Senator Badger, judge in 
he court of common pleas. These two vacancies were not filled. Senator 
larvey was chosen president in place of Senator Badger. 

1817-18. 



Element Storer Portsmouth Benjamin Poole Hollis 

ohn Brodhead Newmarket Jonathan Harvey Sutton 

nomas Chandler Bedford Phineas Handerson Keene 

ohn Harvey Northwood James H. Bingham Alstead 

mos Cogswell Dover Abiathar G. Bribton Orford 

athaniel Shannon .. .Moultonborough Dan Young Lisbon 



164 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



1818-19. 

John Langdon, Jr Portsmouth Benjamin Poole Hollis 

John Brodhead Newmarket Jonathan Harvey Sutton 

Thomas Chandler Bedford Joseph Buffum Westmoreland 

Caleb Stark Dunbarton Uriah Wilcox Newport 

Amos Cogswell Dover Dan Young Lisbon 

Nathaniel Shannon . .Moultonborough J9AO in? H aa^jna uqof 

1819-20. 

George Long Portsmouth Benjamin Poole Hollis 

John Brodhead Newmarket Jonathan Harvey Sutton 

James Parker Litchfield John Wood Keene 

John McClary Epsom Uriah Wilcox Newport 

Amos Cogswell Dover John Durkee Hanover 

Daniel C. Atkinson Sanborn ton Dan Young Lisbon 



1820-21. 



George Long Portsmouth Benjamin Poole Hollis 

John Brodhead Newmarket Jonathan Harvey Sutton 

John Gould Dunbarton Elijah Belding iSwanzey 

Isaac Hill Concord Thomas C Drew Walpole 

Nehemiah Eastman Parmington John Dame Plymouth 

Daniel Hoit Sandwich Dan Young Lisbon 



Senator Young resigned and Abel Merrill of Warren was elected to suc- 
ceed him. 

1821-22. 

Hunking Penhallow Portsmouth John Wallace, Jr Milford 

Newell Healey Kensington Jonathan Harvey Sutton 

Samuel M. Richardson Pelham Jotham Lord, Jr Westmoreland 

Isaac Hill Concord Thomas C. Drew Walpole 

Nehemiah Eastman Farmington Ziba Huntington ...Lebanon 

Daniel Hoit Sandwich Arthur Livermore ..Holderness 



1822-23. 



Langley Boardman Portsmouth John Wallace, Jr.. Milford 

John Kimball Exeter Jonathan Harvey Sutton 

Hezekiah D. Buzzell Weare Jotham Lord, Jr Westmoreland 

Isaac Hill Concord James H. Bingham Alstead 

Nehemiah Eastman Farmington Ziba Huntington Lebanon 

Daniel Hoit Sandwich Arthur Livermore Holderness 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 165 



1823-24. 

Langley Boardman Portsmouth John Wallace, Jr Milford 

John Kimball Exeter Thomas W. Colby Hopkinton 

David L. Morril Goffstown John Wood Keene 

Ezekiel Morrill Canterbury Gawen Gilmore Acworth 

Nehemiah Eastman Farmington James Poole Hanover 

Pearson Cogswell Gilmanton Stephen P. Webster Haverhill 

1824-25. 

Josiah Biartlett Stratham John Wallace, Jr Milford 

John Kimball Exeter Joseph Healey Washington 

John Pattee Goffstown Salma Hale Keene 

Ezekiel Morril Canterbury Gawen Gilmore Acworth 

Nehemiah Eastman Farmington Moses H. Bradley Bristol 

Benning M. Bean Moultonborough Stephen P. Webster Haverhill 

Senator Bean was elected to succeed Senator Pearson Cogswell, who had 
been reelected but declined. 

1825-26. 

William Claggett Portsmouth Jesse Bowers Dunstable 

John Brodhead Newmarket Matthew Harvey Hopkinton 

Thomas Chandler Bedford Phineas Handerson Chesterfield 

Hall Burgin Allenstown Stephen Johnson Walpole 

Andrew Peirce Dover Diarca Allen Lebanon 

Benning M. Bean Moultonborough Stephen P. Webster Haverhill 

Senator Allen was ill and never took his seat. 

1S26-27. 

John W. Parsons Rye Jesse Bowers Dunstable 

John Brodhead Newmarket Matthew Harvey Hopkinton 

Thomas Chandler Bedford Asa Parker Jaffrey 

Hall Burgin Allenstown Stephen Johnson Walpole 

Andrew Peirce Dover James Smith Grantham 

Benning M. Bean Moultonborough Jobn W. Weeks Lancaster 

1827-28. 

John W. Parsons Rye Jesse Bowers Dunstable 

William Plumer, Jr Epping Matthew Harvey Hopkinton 

Thomas Chandler Bedford Asa Parker Jaffrey 

Isaac Hill Concord Jonathan Nye Claremont 

James Bartlett Dover James Minot Bristol 

William Prescott Gilmanton John W. Weeks Lancaster 



166 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



1828-29. 

John W. Parsons Rye John Wallace, Jr Milford 

William Plumer, Jr Epping Bodwell Emerson Hopkinton 

David Steele Goff stown Nahum Parker Fitzwilliam 

Hall Burgin Allenstown Thomas Woolson Claremont 

James Bartlett Dover James Poole Hanover 

Daniel Hoit Sandwich John W. Weeks Lancaster 

Senator Poole died before the legislature met. Senator James Minot of 
Bristol was reelected to isucceed him but declined and there was a vacancy. 

1829-30. 

Abner Greenleaf Portsmouth William Bixby ..Francestown 

Jacob Freese Deerfield Bodwell Emerson Hopkinton 

David Steele Goffstown Levi Chamberlain Fitzwilliam 

Joseph M. Harper Canterbury Horace Hall Charlestown 

John Chadwick Middleton Elijah Miller Hanover 

Ezekiel Wentworth Ossipee Samuel Cartland Haverhill 

1830-31. 

John F. Parrott Portsmouth William Bixby Francestown 

Jacob Freese Deerfield Benjamin Evans Warner 

Frederick G. Stark Manchester Levi Chamberlain Fitzwilliam 

Joseph M. Harper Canterbury Eleazer Jackson, Jr Cornish 

Henry B. Rust Wolfeborough Elijah Miller Hanover 

Ezekiel Wentworth Ossipee Samuel Cartland Haverhill 

Senator Rust was elected to succeed Senator John Chadwick of Middleton, 
who had been reelected but declined. 

1831-32. 

Langley Boardman Portsmouth Daniel Abbott Dunstable 

Bradbury Bartlett Nottingham Nathaniel Knowlton Hopkinton 

Frederick G. Stark Manchester Phineas Handerson Chesterfield 

Aaron Whittemore Pembroke Eleazer Jackson, Jr Cornish 

Henry B. Rust Wolfeborough Robert Burns Hebron 

Benning M. Bean Moultonborough Samuel Cartland Haverhill 

Senator Boardman was elected to succeed Levi Woodbury of Portsmouth, 
who had been elected but declined. 

1832-33. 

Daniel P. Drown Portsmouth Peter Woodbury Francestown 

Bradbury Bartlett Nottingham Nathaniel Knowlton Hopkinton 

Jesse Carr Goffstown Phineas Handerson Chesterfield 

Aaron Whittemore Pembroke Eleazer Jackson, Jr Cornish 

James Farrington Rochester Robert Burns Hebron 

Benning M. Bean Moultonborough Jared W. Williams Lancaster 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 167 

1833-34. 

Daniel P. Drown Portsmouth Peter Woodbury Francestown 

Abel Brown South Hampton Jacob Tuttle Antrim 

Jesse Carr Goffstown Nathan Wild Chesterfield 

Cyrus Barton Concord Austin Corbin Newport 

James Farrington Rochester Caleb Blodgett Dorchester 

Warren Lovell Meredith Jared W. Williams Lancaster 



1834-35. 

Tristram Shaw Hampton Israel Hunt, Jr Dunstable 

Abel Brown South Hampton Reuben Porter Sutton 

Jesse Carr Goffstown Nathan Wild Chesterfield 

Cyrus Barton Concord Austin Corbin Newport 

James Farrington Rochester Caleb Blodgett Dorchester 

Warren Lovell Meredith Jared W. Williams Lancaster 



1835-36. 

Thomas J. Parsons Rye Israel Hunt, Jr Dunstable 

Smith Lamprey Kensington Reuben Porter Sutton 

Charles F. Gove Goffstown Levi Fisk Jaffrey 

James Clark Franklin Samuel Egerton Langdon 

Noah Martin Dover Nathaniel S. Berry Bristol 

Jonathan T. Chase Conway Walter Blair Plymouth 

1836-37. 

Thomas J. Parsons Rye Israel Hunt, Jr Dunstable 

3mith Lamprey Kensington Samuel Jones Bradford 

John Woodbury Salem Levi Fisk Jaffrey 

James Clark Franklin iSamuel Egerton Langdon 

Noah Martin Dover Nathaniel S. Berry Bristol 

Jonathan T. Chase Conway Walter Blair Plymouth 



1837-38. 

Thomas B. Leighton Portsmouth David Stiles Lyndeborough 

Benjamin Jenness Deerfield Samuel Jones Bradford 

John Woodbury Salem Henry Cooledge Keene 

Samuel B. Dyer Loudon John Gove, Jr Claremont 

Szekiel Hurd Dover George W. Lang Hebron 

^eal McGaffey Sandwich Nathaniel P. Melvin Bridgewater 



168 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



1838-39. 

Samuel Cleaves Portsmouth Daniel Adams Mont Vernon 

Benjamin Jenness Deerfield Samuel Jones Bradford 

James McK. Wilkins Bedford John Prentice Keene 

Amos Cogswell Canterbury Austin Tyler Claremont 

Ezekiel Hurd Dover Geonge W. Lang Hebron 

Neal McGaffey Sandwich Nathaniel P. Melvin Plymouth 

Senator Cogswell was elected to succeed Senator Samuel B. Dyer of Lou- 
don, who was reelected but declined. 

1839-40. 

Thomas B. Leighton Portsmouth Daniel Adams Mont Vernon 

James B. Creighton Newmarket Abram Brown Hopkinton 

James McK. Wilkins Bedford John Prentice Keene 

Amos Cogswell Canterbury John Gove, Jr Claremont 

George Nutter Barnstead Converse Goodhue Enfield 

John Comerford Sanbornton James H. Johnson Bath 

1840-4-1. 

James Pickering Newington Daniel Adams Mont Vernon 

James B. Creighton Newmarket Abram Brown Hopkinton 

David A. Gregg Derry Elijah Belding Swanzey 

Peter Renton Concord Jeremiah D. Nettleton Newport 

George Nutter Barnstead Converse Goodhue Enfie'd 

John Comerford Sanbornton James H. Johnson Bath 

1841-42. 

James Pickering Newington Humphrey Moore Milford 

Samuel Hatch Exeter Jacob Straw Henniker 

David A. Gregg Derry Elijah Belding Swanzey 

Peter Renton .Concord Jeremiah D. Nettleton Newport 

George McDaniell Barrington Josiah Quincy Rumney 

John L. Perley Meredith Simeon B. Johnson Littleton 

1842-43. 

Thomas P. Treadwell Portsmouth Titus Brown Francestown 

Samuel Hatch Exeter Jacob Straw Henniker 

Simon P. Colby Weare James Batcheller Marlborough 

Isaac Hale Franklin Daniel M. Smith Lempster 

George McDaniell Barrington Josiah Quincy Rumney 

John L. Perley Meredith Simeon Warner Whitefield 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 169 



1843-44. 

ohn K. Hatch Greenland Titus Brown Francestown 

onathan Morrill Brentwood T. Hoskins Westmoreland 

limon P. Colby Weare Elijah Carpenter Swanzey 

saac Hale Franklin Daniel M. Smith Lempster 

indrew Pierce, Jr Dover Joseph -Sweatt Andover 

iebulon Pease Freedom Simeon Warner Whitefield 



ohn K. Hatch Greenland William McKean Deering 

onathan Morrill Brentwood T. Hoskins Westmoreland 

esse Gibson Pelham Benaiah Cooke Keene 

Lsa P. Cate Northfield Reuben Davis Cornish 

oseph H. Smith Dover Joseph Sweatt Andover 

iebulon Pease Freedom Ephraim Cross Lancaster 

1845-46. 

tephen Demeritt Durham William McKean Deering 

'erley Robinson Poplin David Patten Hancock 

esse Gibson Pelham Salma Hale Keene 

P. Cate Northfield Reuben Davis Cornish 

oseph H. Smith Dover Sylvanus Hewes Lyme 

harles Lane Meredith Ephraim Cross Lancaster 

1846-47. 

H. Dodge Hampton Falls Timothy Abbott WiRon 

braham Emerson Candia David Patten Hancock 

imes U. Parker Merrimack Nathaniel Kingsbury Temple 

ndrew Taylor Canterbury Asa Page Sutton 

fm. W. Rollins Somersworth Irenus Hamilton Lyme 

rtemas Harmon Eaton Harry Hibbard Bath 

Senator Taylor was elected to succeed Senator William H. Gage of 
oscawen, who was elected and unseated. 

1847-48. 

mes Foss Stratham Ralph E. Tenney Hollis 

araham Emerson Candia Frederick Vose Walpole 

oyes Poor Goffstown Frederick Boyden Hinsdale 

illiam H. Gage Boscawen Asa Page Sutton 

mes Drake Pittsfield Sylvanus Hewes Lyme 

larles Lane Gilford Harry Hibbard Bath 



170 NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



1848-49. 

James Foss Stratham Ralph E. Tenney Hollis 

Joseph D. Pindar Newmarket Frederick Vose Walpole 

Noyes Poor Goffstown John Preston New Ipswich 

William H. Gage Boscawen John Robb Acworth 

James Drake Pittsfield William P. Weeks Canaan 

Jeremiah Dame Farmington Harry Hibbard Bath 

1849-50. 

Richard Jenness Portsmouth Daniel Batchelder Wilton 

Charles Sanborn East Kingston Hiram Monroe Hillsborough 

Samuel Marshall Derry John Preston New Ipswich 

Joseph Clough, 3d Loudon John Robb Acworth 

S. P. Montgomery Strafford William P. Weeks Canaan 

Jeremiah Dame Farmington William Clark Campton 

1850-51. 

Richard Jenness Portsmouth Daniel Batchelder Wilton 

Charles .Sanborn Bast Kingston Hiram Monroe Hillsborough 

Samuel Marshall Derry James Batcheller Marlborough 

Joseph Clouigh, 3d Loudon Daniel N. Adams Springfield 

S. P. Montgomery Strafford Abraham P. Hoit Bridgewater 

Abel Haley Tuftonborough William Clark Campton 

1851-52. 

Alfred Hoit Lee Albert McKean Nashua 

John S. Wells Exeter Jacob Taylor Stoddard 

Peter P. Woodbury Bedford James Batcheller Marlborough 

John S. Shannon Gilmanton Daniel N. Adams Springfield 

Asa Freeman Dover Abraham P. Hoit Bridgewater 

Abel Haley Tuftonborough Joseph Pitman Bartlett 

1852-53. 

Alfred Hoit Lee B. B. Whittemore Nashua 

John S. Wells Exeter Jacob Taylor Stoddard 

Peter P. Woodbury Bedford Asahel H. Bennett Winchester 

John S. 'Shannon Gilmanton A. B. Williamson Claremont 

Asa Freeman Dover Thomas Merrill Enfield 

Bradbury C. Tuttle Meredith James M. Rix Lancaster 

1853-54. 

John M. Weare Seiabrook B. B. Whittemore Nashua 

Josiah IC. Eastman Hampstead Leonard Eaton Warner 

Charles Stark Manchester A. H. Bennett Winchester 

Ebenezer Symmes Concord A. B.Williamson Claremont 

I. G. Jordan Somersworth Thomas Merrill Enfield 

Bradbury C. Tuttle Meredith James M. Rix , Lancaster 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 171 



1854-55. 

John M. Weare Seabrook Robert B. Cochran New Boston 

Josiah C. Eastman Hampstead Leonard Eaton Warner 

Nathan Parker Bedford William Haile Hinsdale 

Ebenezer Symmes Concord Oliver B. Buswell Grantham 

I. G. Jordan Somersworth J. Everett Sargent Wentworth 

Obed Hall Tamworth Jonas D. Sleeper Haverhill 

1855-56. 

Marcellus Bufford Portsmouth Moody Hobbs Pelham 

Thomas J. Melvin Chester George W. Hammond Gilsum 

Nathan Parker Manchester William Haile Hinsdale 

William H. Rixford Concord Nathan Mudgett Newport 

George M. Herring Farmington John Clough Enfield 

Larkin D. Mason Tamworth Jonas D. Sleeper Haverhill 



1856-57. 

Daniel Marcy Portsmouth Moody Hobbs Pelham 

Thomas J. Melvin Chester Robert B. Cochran New Boston 

Moody Currier Manchester George W. Hammond Gilsum 

Charles Rowell Allenstown Nathan Mudgett Newport 

George M. Herring Farmington John Clough Enfield 

Obed Hall Tamworth William Burns Lancaster 



1857-58. 

Daniel Marcy Portsmouth Aaron W. Sawyer Nashua 

John Ordway Hampstead Daniel Paige Weare 

Moody Currier Manchester C.F.Brooks Westmoreland 

Charles Rowell Allenstown John P. Chellis Plainfield 

M. C. Burleigh Somersworth Austin F. Pike Franklin 

Roberts. Webster Barnstead William Burns Lancaster 



1858-59. 

Samuel P. Dow Newmarket Aaron W. Sawyer Nashua 

John Ordway Hampstead Daniel Paige Weare 

John M. Parker Goffstown C. F. Brooks Westmoreland 

Joseph A. Gilmore Concord John P. Chellis Plainfield 

M. C. Burleigh Somersworth Austin F. Pike Franklin 

Roberts. Webster Barnstead John G. Sinclair Bethlehem 



172 NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



1853-60. 

John S. Bennett Newmarket Hosea Eaton New Ipswich 

Joseph Blake Raymond Walter Harriman Warner 

John M. Parker Goffstown Thomas Fisk Dublin 

Joseph A. Gilmore Concord Jesse Slader Acworth 

John D. Lyman ..Farmington George S. Towle Lebanon 

Samuel Emerson Moultonborough John G. Sinclair Bethlehem 

1860-61. 

Clement March Portsmouth Hosea Eaton New Ipswich 

Joseph Blake ....Raymond Walter Harriman Warner 

Herman Foster Manchester Thomas Fisk Dublin 

David Morrill, Jr Canterbury Jesse Slader Acworth 

John D. Lyman Farmington George S. Towle Lebanon 

Eli Wentworth Milton William A. Burns Rumney 

Senator March never took his seat. 



1861-62. 

W. H. Y. Hackett Portsmouth Leonard Chase 'Milf ord 

William C. Patten Kingston John Burnham Hopkinton 

Herman Foster Manchester John J. Allen, Jr Fitzwilliam 

David Morrill, Jr Canterbury Lemuel P. Cooper Croydon 

Charles A. Tufts Dover Cyrus Adams Grafton 

Eli Wentworth Milton William A. Burns Rumney 

1862-63. 

W. H. Y. Hackett Portsmouth Leonard Chase Milford 

William C. Patten Kingston John Burnham Hopkinton 

Isaac W. Smith Manchester John J. Allen, Jr Fitzwilliam 

Onslow Stearns Concord Lemuel P. Cooper Croydon 

Charles A. Tufts Dover Cyrus Adams Grafton 

John Wadleigh Meredith Amos W. Drew .Stewartstown 



1863-64. 

Charles W. Hatch Greenland Edward P. Emerson Nashua 

Charles H. Bell .Exeter Charles J. Smith Mont Vernon 

Isaac W. Smith Manchester Milan Harris Nelson 

Onslow Stearns Concord Amos F. Fiske Marlow 

C. S. Whitehouse Rochester Daniel Blaisdell Hanover 

John Wadleigh Meredith Amos W. Drew Stewartstown 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 173 



1864-65. 

Charles W. Hatch Greenland Edward P. Emerson Nashua 

Charles H. Bell Exeter Charles J. Smith Mont Vernon 

Ezekiel A. Straw Manchester Milan Harris Nelson 

Henry L. Burnham Dunbarton Amos F. Fiske Marlow 

C. S. Whitehouse Rochester Daniel Blaisdell Hanover 

W. H. H. Mason Moultonborough George A. Bingham Littleton 



1865-66. 

Darius Frink Newington Joseph Newell Wilton 

Joseph F. Dearborn Deerfield John W. Morse Bradford 

Ezekiel A. Straw Manchester Orrin Perkins Winchester 

H. L. Burnham Dunbarton John M. Glidden Charlestown 

G. W. Burleigh Somersworth Daniel Barnard Franklin 

W. H. H. Mason Moultonborough George A. Bingham Littleton 

1866-67. 

Darius Frink Newington Joseph Newell Wilton 

Joseph J. Dearborn Deerfield John W. Morse Bradford 

William T. Parker Merrimack Orrin Perkins Winchester 

Henry F. Sanborn Epsom John M. Glidden Charlestown 

G. W. Burleigh Somersworth Daniel Barnard Franklin 

Orsino A. J. Vaughan Laconia Thomas J. Smith Wentworth 



1867-68. 

Ezra A. S'tevens Portsmouth Thomas H. Marshall Mason 

Isaiah L. Robinson Fremont Jo,hn M. Hayes Salisbury 

William T. Parker Merrimack Benjamin Read Swanzey 

Henry F. Sanborn Epsom Levi W. Barton Newport 

Alonzo I. Nute Farmington Henry W. Blair Plymouth 

Orsino A. J. Vaughan Laconia Thomas J. Smith Wentworth 



1868-69. 

Ezra A. Stevens Portsmouth Thomas H. Marshall Mason 

Isaiah L. Robinson Fremont John M. Hayes Salisbury 

Jos. F. Kennard Manchester Benjamin Read Swanzey 

John Y. Mugridge Concord Levi W. Barton Newport 

Alonzo I. Nute Farmington Henry W. Blair Plymouth 

Edwin Pease Conway John W. Barney Lancaster 



174 NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



1869-70. 

John H. Bailey Portsmouth Oilman Scripture Nashua 

Nathaniel Gordon Exeter Jonas Livingston Peterborough 

Jos. F. Kennard Manchester Ellery Albee Winchester 

John Y. Mugridge Concord Ira Colby, Jr Claremont 

George C. Peavey Strafford Cyrus Taylor Bristol 

Ezra Gould Sandwich John W. Barney Lancaster 

Senator Taylor was elected to succeed Edwin D. Sanborn of Hanover, who 
was elected but declined. 

1870-71. 

William B. Small Newmarket Gilman Scripture Nashua 

Nathaniel Gordon Exeter A. Whittemore Bennington 

George Holbrook Manchester Ellery Albee Winchester 

Reuben L. French Pittsfield Ira Colby, Jr Claremont 

George C. Peavey Strafford Cyrus Taylor Bristol 

William N. Blair Laconia George W. M. Pitman Bartlefct 

1871-72. 

Daniel Marcy Portsmouth Charles H. Campbell Nashua 

Matthew H. Taylor Salem George Jones Warner 

George Holbrook Manchester T. A. Barker Westmoreland 

Charles T. Cram Pittsfield Al vah Smith Lempster 

Joshua G. Hall Dover Lewis W. Fling Bristol 

John C. Moulton Laconia Geo. W. M. Pitman Bartlett 

Senator Smith was elected to succeed Samuel P. Thrasher of Lempster, 
who was elected but died before the legislature met. 

1872-73. 

Warren Brown Hampton Falls Charles H. Campbell Nashua 

Matthew H. Taylor Salem George Jones Warner 

George C. Foster Bedford Tileston A. Barker Westmoreland 

David A. Warde Concord Henry A. Hitchcock Walpole 

Joshua G. Hall Dover Lewis W. Fling Bristol 

John C. Moulton Laconia James J. Barrett Littleton 

1873-74. 

Warren Brown Hampton Falls Charles H. Burns Wilton 

Charles Sanborn Sandown William H. Gove Weare 

George C. Foster Bedford Henry Abbott Winchester 

David A. Warde Concord Henry A. Hitchcock Walpole 

Edwin Wallace Rochester Warren F. Daniell Franklin 

Otis G. Hatch Tamworth Eleazer B. Parker Franconia 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



175 



1874-75. 



Jeremiah F. Hall Portsmouth Thomas P. Pierce Nashua 

James Priest Derry William H. Gove Weare 

G. Byron Chandler Manchester Henry Abbott Winchester 

George E. Todd Concord George H. Stowell Claremont 

William H. Farrar Somersworth Warren F. Daniell Franklin 

John W. Sanborn Wakefield Eleazer B. Parker Franconia 



1875-76. 

Jeremiah F. Hall Portsmouth Charles Holman Nashua 

James Priest Derry Alonzo F. Carr Goffstown 

Samuel H. Martin Manchester George A. Whitney Rindge 

John Proctor Andover George H. Stowell Claremont 

Joshua B. Smith Durham Joseph D. Weeks Canaan 

John W. Sanborn Wakefield Wayne Cobleigh Northumberland 

1876-77. 

Thomas Leavitt Exeter Charles Holman Nashua 

Natt Head Hooksetit Alonzo F. Carr Goffstown 

James F. Briggs Manchester Royal H. Porter Keene 

George E. Todd Concord James Burnap Marlow 

Joshua B. Smith Durham James W. Johnson Enfield 

John F. Cloutman Farmington Wayne Cobleigh Northumberland 



1877-78. 



Marcellus Eldridge Portsmouth 

John W. Wheeler Salem 

Hiram K. Slayton Manchester 

Natt Head Hooksett 

David H. Buffum Somersworth 

John F. Cloutman Farmington 



Harrison Eaton Amherst 

Oliver H. Noyes Henniker 

Royal H. Porter Keene 

James Burnap Marlow 

James W. Johnson Enfield 

William H. Cummings Lisbon 



1878-79. 



Emmons B. Philbrick Rye 

John W. Wheeler Salem 

Hiram K. Slayton Manchester 

Jacob H. Gallinger Concord 

David H. Buffum Somersworth 

Thom-as Cogswell Gilmanton 



John A. Spalding Nashua 

Daniel M. White Peterborough 

Charles J. Amidon Hinsdale 

Albert M. Shaw Lebanon 

Joseph D. Weeks Canaan 

William H. Curnmings Lisbon 



In 1878 the senate was doubled in size by constitutional amendment and 
the state divided into twenty-'four districts, equal in wealth. The term of 
office was doubled also, making it two years. 



176 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



18*9-80. 



Sherburne R. Merrill Colebrook 

Edward F. Mann Benton 

Albert M. Shaw Lebanon 

Hiram Hodgdon Ashland 

Isaac N. Blodgett Franklin 

Dudley C. Coleman Brookfield 

Albert Pitts Charlestown 

Cornelius Cooled(ge Hillsborough 

Nehemiah G. Ordway Warner 

Jacob H. Gallinger Concord 

Charles E. Cate Northwood 

Luther Hayes Milton 



Edward Gustine Keene 

Charles J. Amidon Hinsdale 

Charles H. Burns Wilton 

George W. Todd Mont Vernon 

Orren C. Moore Nashua 

Elbridge G. Haynes Manchester 

William G. Perry Manchester 

William H. Shepard Derry 

Greenleaf Clarke Atkinson 

Emmons B. Philbrick Rye 

Charles E. Smith Dover 

John H. Broughton Portsmouth 



1881-82. 



Sherburne R. Merrill Colebrook 

Edward F. Mann Benton 

Alfred A. Cox Enfield 

Joseph M. Clough New London 

Richard Gove Laconia 

Joseph C. Moore Gilford 

George H. Fairbanks Newport 

Cornelius Cooledge Hillsborough 

Grovenor A. Curtice Hopkinton 

John Kimball Concord 

George H. Towle Deerfield 

Charles W. Talpey Farmington 



Edward Gustine Keene 

John M. Parker Fitzwilliam 

George W. Cummings . . .Francestown 

Timothy Kaley Milford 

Virgil C. Gilman Nashua 

George C. Gilmore Manchester 

David B. Varney Manchester 

Silas F. Learned Chester 

Amos C. Chase Kingston 

Lafayette Hall Newmarket 

James F. Seavey Dover 

John S. Treat Portsmouth 



1883-84. 



Irving W. Drew Lancaster 

Harry Bingham Littleton 

David E. Willard Orford 

Benjamin F. Perkins Bristol 

Jonathan M. Taylor Sanbornton 

Levi K. Haley Wolf eborough 

Chester Pike Cornish 

Thomas Dinsmore Alstead 

Charles H. Amsden Concord 

Henry Robinson Concord 

Aaron Whittemore, Jr Pittsfield 

Charles W. Folsom Rochester 



George K. Harvey Surry 

George G. Davis Marlborough 

George W. Cummings ...Francestown 

George A. Wason New Boston 

Amos Webster Nashua 

Charles H. Bartlett Manchester 

Israel Dow Manchester 

Benjamin R. Wheeler Salem 

Francis T. French East Kingston 

Lafayette Hall Newmarket 

James F. Seavey Dover 

John Laighton Portsmouth 



Senator Taylor was elected to succeed Daniel S. Dinsmore of Laconia, 
who was elected but died before the legislature met. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



177 



1885-86. 



Henry O. Kent Lancaster 

Harry Bingham Littleton 

Elias H. Cheney Lebanon 

Manson H. Brown Plymouth 

John F. Taylor Tilton 

Asa M. Brackett Wakefield 

Chester Pike Cornish 

John S. Collins Gilsum 

Walter S. Davis Hopkinton 

Lyman D. Stevens Concord 

Jonathan F. Berry Barrington 

Thomas G. Jameson Somersworth 



William P. Chamberlain Keene 

Murray Davis Chesterfield 

Peter H. Clark New Ipswich 

William H. W. Hinds Milford 

Hiram T. Morrill Nashua 

Abraham P. Olzendam ...Manchester 

Edwin H. Hobbs Manchester 

Jesse Gault Hooksett 

Nathaniel H. Clark Plaistow 

John Hatch Greenland 

William H. Morton Rollinsford 

Moses H. Goodrich Portsmouth 



Senator Morrill never took his seat and died during the session and Frank 
G. Thurston of Nashua was elected to succeed him. 



1887- 



Samuel E. Paine Berlin 

Lycurgus Pitman Conway 

Frank D. Currier Canaan 

James E. French Moultonborough 

Robert C. Carr Andover 

Frank M. Rollins Gilford 

Dexter Richards Newport 

Nathan C. Jameson Antrim 

Edmund E. Truesdell Pembroke 

Enoch Gerrish Concord 

Charles S. George Barnstead 

Charles H. Looney Milton 



Charles H. Hersey Keene 

Ezra S. Stearns Rindge 

Franklin Worcester Hollis 

Oliver D. Sawyer Weare 

Edward O. Blunt Nashua 

George S. Eastman Manchester 

Henry A. Bailey Manchester 

Leonard A. Morrison Windham 

Edward H. Gilman Exeter 

David Jenness Rye 

Benjamin F. Nealley Dover 

Francis E. Langdon Portsmouth 



1889-9 



Nathan R. Perkins Jefferson 

William H. Mitchell Littleton 

Isaac Willard Orford 

Thomas P. Cheney Ashland 

Thaddeus S. Moses Meredith 

Henry B. Quinby Gil'ford 

George L. Balcom Claremont 

Augustus W. Gray Bennington 

John C. Pearson Boscawen 

Charles R. Corning Concord 

James B. Tennant Epsom 

Edward T. Wilson Farmington 



Daniel W. Rugg Keene 

Ezra S. Stearns Rindge 

Frank G. Clark Peterborough 

David Arthur Taggart Goffstown 

David A. Gregg Nashua 

Charles T. Means Manchester 

George H. Stearns Manchester 

George S. Butler Pelham 

Edwin G. Eastman Exeter 

Charles A. Sinclair Portsmouth 

John H. Nute Dover 

William Conn Portsmouth 



178 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

1891-92. 

Jason H. Dudley Colebrook Joseph R. Beal Keene 

Edwin Snow Eaton George W. Pierce Winchester 

William S. 'Carter Lebanon Charles E. Hall Greenville 

Richard W. Musgrove Bristol John McLane Milford 

Alvah W. Sulloway Franklin Charles S. Collins Nashua 

Arthur L. Hodgdon Ossipee Horatio Fradd Manchester 

George S. iSmith Charlestown Perry H. Dow Manchester 

Jacob B. Whittemore ...Hillsborough Frank P. Woodbury Salem 

Henry M. Baker Bow George R. Rowe Brentwood 

George A. Cummings Concord Richard M. Scammon Stratham 

John G. Tallant Concord Miah B. Sullivan Dover 

Samuel D. Felker Rochester Charles A. Sinclair Portsmouth 



1893-94. 

Pearson G. Evans Gorham Clement J. Woodward Keene 

Edward Woods Bath Walter L. Goodnow Jaffrey 

Newton S. Huntington Hanover John McLane Milford 

Charles H. Damon Campton Freeman Higgins Manchester 

Frank K. Hobbs Ossipee Alfred G. Fairbanks Manchester 

George A. Hatch Laconia Leonard P. Reynolds Manchester 

Shepherd L. Bowers Newport Joseph Woodbury Howiard Nashua 

George S. Peavey Greenfield George F. Hammond Nashua 

George C. Preston Henniker John D. Lyman Exeter 

Joseph B. Walker Concord John C. Tasker Dover 

John Whi taker Concord Andrew Killoren Dover 

William E. Waterhouse . ..Barrington Calvin Page Portsmouth 



1895-96. 

Thomas H. Van Dyke . . .Stewartstown Thaddeus W. Barker Nelson 

William D. Baker Rumney William J. Reed Westmoreland 

Henry H. Palmer Piermont Samuel F. Murry Wilton 

Amos L. Rollins Alton Marcellus Gould Manchester 

William C. Sinclair Ossipee Edward B. Woodbury Manchester 

William F. Knight Laconia John P. Bartlett Manchester 

Herman Holt Claremont Francis A. Gordon Merrimack 

George A. Wason New Boston Charles W. Stevens Nashua 

Frank C. Towle Hooksett Stephen H. Gale Exeter 

Frank W. Rollins Concord Jeremiah Langley Durham 

Edmund H. Brown Concord Charles E. Folsom Epping 

James A. Edgerly Somersworth Charles A. 'Sinclair Portsmouth 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



179 



1897-98. 



Chester B. Jordan Lancaster 

Charles H. Greenleaf Franconia 

Harry M. Cheney Lebanon 

Samuel B. Wiggin Sandwich 

A. Crosby Kennett Conway 

Charles C. Kenrick Franklin 

Seth M. Richards Newport 

Thomas N. Hastings Walpole 

Willis G. Buxton Boscawen 

Gardner B. Emmons Concord 

James G. Fellows Pembroke 

Albert Wallace Rochester 



Frederic A. Faulkner Keene 

Lemuel F. Liscom Hinsdale 

Charles Scott Peterborough 

Loring B. Bodwell Manchester 

Zebulon F. Campbell Manchester 

Timothy J. Howard Manchester 

Horace S. Ashley Nashua 

Nathaniel Wentworth Hudson 

Rufus E. Graves Brentwood 

John T. Welch Dover 

Frank H. Durgin Newmarket 

John W. Emery Portsmouth 



1899-1900. 



Frank P. Brown Whitefield 

Oscar C. Hatch Littleton 

George H. Gordon Canaan 

George H. Adams Plymouth 

James F. Safford Farming-ton 

Stephen S. Jewett Laconia 

Frederick Jewett Claremont 

Thomas N. Hastings Walpole 

Walter Putney Bow 

Charles C. Danforth Concord 

George E. Miller Pembroke 

Elbridge W. Fox Milton 



Bertram Ellis Keene 

Frederick B. Pierce Chesterfield 

David E. Proctor Wilton 

John L. Sanborn Manchester 

Charles M. Floyd Manchester 

Joseph P. Chatel Manchester 

Frank W, Maynard Nashua 

John H. Field Nashua 

Alfred A. Collins Danville 

Nathaniel Horn Dover 

Charles A. Morse Newmarket 

Henry A. Yeaton Portsmouth 



1901-02. 



Cassius M. C. Twitchell Milan 

Daniel C. Remich Littleton 

Ira A. Chase Bristol 

Edwin C. Bean Belmont 

J. Frank Farnham Wakefield 

Edward G. Leach Franklin 

Nathaniel G. Brooks Charlestown 

Edwin W. H. Farnum. . .Francestown 

Eugene S. Head Hooksett 

Henry W. Stevens Concord 

George P. Little Pembroke 

James A. Locke Somersworth 



Bertram Ellis Keene 

Albert Annette Jaffrey 

Frank E. Kaley Milford 

Harry P. Ray Manchester 

Frederick W. Shontell Manchester 

Michael F. Sullivan Manchester 

William S. Pillsbury Londonderry 

Andros B. Jones Nashua 

Albert S. Wetherell Exeter 

James A. Bunker R.ollinsford 

John Leddy Epping 

David Urch Portsmouth 



180 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



1903-04. 



William F. Allen Stewartstown 

Henry W. Keyes Haverhill 

G-eorge E. Whitney Enfield 

Joseph Lewando Wolfeborough 

Alvah W. Burnell Bartlett 

Elmer S. Tilton Laconia 

John B. Cooper Newport 

Fred J. Marvin Alstead 

Marcellus H. Felt Hillsborough 

Ferdinand A. Stillings Concord 

James G. Fellows Pembroke. 

John H. Neal Rochester 



Levi A. Fuller Marlborough 

Franklin Ripley Troy 

Aaron M. Wilkins Amherst 

James Lightbody Manchester 

John C. Bickford Manchester 

Thomas J. Foley Manchester 

Charles W. Hoitt Nashua 

Jason E. Tolles Nashua 

Arthur E. Hoyt Plaistow 

Lucien Thompson Durham 

Allen D. Richmond Dover 

Calvin Page Portsmouth 



1905-06. 



Garvin R. Magoon Stratford 

Ernest L. Bell Woodstock 

George E. Whitney Enfield 

George H. Adams Plymouth 

Samuel S. Parker Farmington 

Frederick A. Holmes Franklin 

George H. Bartlett Sunapee 

Fred H. Kimball Bennington 

Frank P. Quimby Concord 

Harry H. Dudley Concord 

Newman Durell Pittsfield 

James H. Kelsey Nottingham 



George H. Follansbee Keene 

Henry D. Learned Dublin 

Herbert J. Taft Greenville 

John B. Cavanaugh Manchester 

Johann Adam Graf Manchester 

Arthur W. Dinsmore Manchester 

Charles W. Abbott Derry 

Wallace W. Cole Salem 

Walter A. Allen Hampstead 

Frank B. Clark Dover 

Thomas Loughlin Portsmouth 

Thomas Entwistle Portsmouth 



1907-08. 



George W. Darling Whitefield 

Seth F. Hoskins Lisbon 

Hamilton T. Howe Hanover 

George H. Saltmarsh Laconia 

Frank S. Lord Ossipee 

Charles O. Downing Laconia 

David R. Roys Claremont 

Fred H. Kimball Bennington 

Henry C. Davis Warner 

Fred N. Marden Concord 

John Swenson Concord 

Frank E. Libby Somersworth 



Charles Gale Shedd Keene 

Allen C. Wilcox Swanzey 

Herbert O. Hadley Peterborough 

Robert R. Chase Manchester 

Henry W. Boutwell Manchester 

Byron Worthen Manchester 

Charles A. Roby Nashua 

Herbert C. Lintott Nashua 

John Scammon Exeter 

John H. Nealley Dover 

Ezra O. Pinkham Dover 

Thomas Entwistle Portsmouth 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



181 



1909-10. 



Abram M. Stahl Berlin 

George H. Turner Bethlehem 

George H. Calley Bristol 

John A. Edgerly Tuftonboro 

Edward E. Rice New Durham 

William Wallace Laconia 

Frank W. Hamlin Charlestown 

Edson H. Patch Francestown 

Benjamin F. Greer Goffstown 

William M. Ghase Concord 

Jeremiah A. Clough Loudon 

Charles H. Seavey Rochester 



Herbert E. Adams Gilsum 

Leason Martin Richmond 

Robert P. Bass Peterborough 

Frank W. Leeman Manchester 

Harry T. Lord Manchester 

Michael E. Ahern Manchester 

Everett E. Parker Merrimack 

William H. Patten Nashua 

J. N. Sanborn Hampton Falls 

Clarence I. Hurd Dover 

John F. Emery Stratham 

Thos. Entwistle Portsmouth 



1911-12. 



John Cross Colebrook 

Charles H. Hosford Monroe 

George S. Rogers Lebanon 

Jonathan M. Cheney Ashland 

James O. Gerry Madison 

Charles H. Bean Franklin 

Robert J. Merrill Claremont 

John W. Prentiss Walpole 

Arthur J. Boutwell Hopkinton 

Alvin B. Cross Concord 

George H. Guptill Raymond 

Haven Doe Somersworth 



Windsor H. Goodnow Keene 

Charles L. Rich Jaffrey 

Daniel W. Hayden Hollis 

Charles E. Chapman Manchester 

Robert Leggett Manchester 

Michael E. Ahern Manchester 

William D. Swart Nashua 

Alvin J. Lucier Nashua 

Reginald C. Stevenson Exeter 

John W. Jewell Dover 

Clarence H. Paul Portsmouth 

John Pender Portsmouth 



1913-44. 



John C. Hutchins Stratford 

Edward E. Gates Lisbon 

James B. Wallace Canaan 

Frank J. Beal Plymouth 

James O. Gerry Madison 

Enos K. Sawyer Franklin 

Samuel H. Edes Newport 

John W. Prentiss Walpole 

Henry A. Emerson Henniker 

John A. Blackwood Concord 

Charles B. Rogers Pembroke 

J. N. Haines Somersworth 



Frank Huntress Keene 

W. E. Emerson Fitzwilliam 

George C. Tolford Wilton 

Harry C. Clough Manchester 

Thos. Chalmers Manchester 

J. W. S. Joyal Manchester 

James Farnsworth Nashua 

Frederick J. Gaffney Nashua 

John iScammon Exeter 

Daniel Chesley Durham 

M. T. Kennedy Newmarket 

J. G. Parsons Portsmouth 



In 1913 the state was redistricted into senatorial districts. The constitu- 
tion was amended to provide for election of senators by plurality instead of 
majority vote 



182 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

1&15-4L6. 

Eugene F. Bailey Berlin Nathaniel S. Drake Pittsfield 

Edgar O. Crossman Lisbon Nathaniel E. Martin Concord 

Elmer E. Woodbury Woodstock George I. Haselton Manchester 

Arthur R. Shirley Conway Joseph P. Kenney Manchester 

Frank A. Musgrove Hanover Adolph Wagner Manchester 

George F. Clark Franklin William Marcotte Manchester 

William E. Kinney Claremont Charles W. Varney Rochester 

William A. Danforth Hopkinton Valentine Mathes Dover 

Orville E. Cain Keene Carl J. Whiting Raymond 

Ezra M. Smith Peterborough Herbert Perkins Hampton 

Charles W. Howard Nashua John G. Parsons Portsmouth 

Alvin J. Lucier Nashua 

In 1915 the state was redistricted into senatorial districts. 
Presidents of the Senate. 

Name and Residence. Term Served. 

Woodbury Langdon, Portsmouth 1784-85 

John McClary, Epsom 1785-87 

Joseph Gilman, Exeter 1787-88 

John Pickering, Portsmouth 1788-9 

Ebenezer Smith, Meredith 1790-91, 92-93, 95-97 

Moses Dow, Haverhill 1791-92 

Abiel Foster, Canterbury 1793-94 

Oliver Peabody, Exeter 1794-95, 1815 

Amos Shepard, Alstead 1797-1804 

Nicholas Gilman, Exeter 1804-05 

Clement Storer, Portsmouth 18 05-07 

Samuel Bell, Francestown 1807-09 

Moses P. Payson, Bath 1809-10, 13-16 

William Plumer, Epping 1810-12 

Joshua Darling, Henniker 1812-13 

William Badger, Gilmanton 1816-17 

Jonathan Harvey, Sutton 1817-23 

David L. Morrill, Goffstown 1823-24 

Josiah Bartlett, Stratham 1824-25 

Matthew Harvey, Hopkinton 1825-28 

Nahum Parker, Fitzwilliam 1828-29 

Abner Greenleaf, Portsmouth 1829 

Samuel Cartland, Haverhill 1829-30, 1831 

Joseph M. Harper, Canterbury 1830-31 

Benning M. Bean, Moultonborough 1831-33 

Jared W. Williams, Lancaster 1833-35 

Charles F. Gove, Goffstown 1835-36 

James Clark, Franklin 1836-37 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 183 

Name and Residence. Term Served. 

John Woodbury, Salem 1837-38 

Samuel Jones, Bradford 1838-39 

James McK. Wilkins, Bedford 1839-40 

James B. Creighton, Newmarket 1840-41 

Josiah Quincy, Rumney 1841-4 3 

Titus Brown, Francestown 1843-44 

Timothy Hoskins, Westmoreland 1844-45 

Asa P. Cate, Northfield 1845-46 

James U. Parker, Merrimack 1846-47 

Harry Hibbard, Bath 1847-49 

William P. Weeks, Canaan 18 49-5 

Richard Jenness, Portsmouth 18 50-51 

John S. Wells, Exeter 18 51-53 

James M. Rix, Lancaster 1853-54 

Jonathan E. Sargent, Wentworth 18 54-55 

William Haile, Hinsdale 1855-56 

Thomas J. Melvin, Chester 18 56-57 

Moody Currier, Manchester 1857-58 

Austin F. Pike, Franklin 18 58-59 

Joseph A. Gilmore, Concord 1859-60 

George S. Towle, Lebanon 186 0-61 

Herman Foster, Manchester 1861-62 

William H. Y. Hackett, Portsmouth 1862-6 3 

Onslow Stearns, Concord 1863-64 

Charles H. Bell, Exeter 1864-65 

Ezekiel A. Straw, Manchester 186 5-66 

Daniel Barnard, Franklin 1866-6 7 

William T. Parker, Merrimack 186 7-6 8 

Ezra A. Stevens, Portsmouth 186 8-6 9 

John Y. Mugridge, Concord 1869-70 

Nathaniel Gordon, Exeter 1870-71 

George W. M. Pitman, Bartlett. 1871-72 

Charles H. Campbell, Nashua 1872-73 

David A. Warde, Concord 18 73-74 

William H. Gove, Weare 1874-75 

John W. Sanborn, Wakefield 1875-76 

Charles Holman, Nashua 1876-77 

Natt Head, Hooksett 1877-78 

David H. Buffum, Somersworth 1878-79 

Jacob H. Gallinger, Concord 1879-81 

John Kimball, Concord 1881-83 

Charles H. Bartlett, Manchester 1883-85 

Chester Pike, Cornish 1885-87 

Frank D. Currier, Canaan 1887-89 

David A. Taggart, Goffstown 1889-91 

John McLane, Milford 1891-95 

Frank W. Rollins, Concord 1895-97 



184 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Name and Residence. Term Served. 

Chester B. Jordan, Lancaster 1897-9 9 

Thomas N. Hastings, Walpole 1899-1901 

Bertram Ellis, Keene 19 01-03 

Charles W. Hoitt, Nashua 19 03-05 

George H. Adams, Plymouth 19 05-07 

John Scammon, Exeter 19 07-09 

Harry T. Lord, Manchester 19 09-11 

William D. Swart, Nashua 1911-13 

Enos K. Sawyer, Franklin 1913-15 

George I. Haselton, Manchester 1915-17 

Speakers of the House. 

The house elects a speaker at each session to be the presid- 
ing officer. The following is a list of the speakers from the 
beginning of the colonial legislature, together with the term 
served by each: 

Name and Residence. Term Served. 

Richard Waldron, Jr., Portsmouth 16 8 4-92 

Richard Martin, Portsmouth 1692 

John Gilman, Exeter. 1692-9 3 

John Pickering, Portsmouth 169 3-9 5, 9 7-9 8 

98-99, 1702, 1703-09 

George Jaffrey, Portsmouth 169 5-96 

John Plaisted, Portsmouth 1696-9 7, 1717 

Henry Dow, Hampton 1698 

Samuel Penhallow, Portsmouth 1699-1702 

Daniel Tilton, Hampton 1702-03 

Mark Hunking, Portsmouth 1709-10 

Richard Gerrish, Portsmouth 1710-17 

Thomas Packer,. Portsmouth 1717-19 

Joshua Peirce, Portsmouth 1719-22 

Peter Weare, Hampton Falls 1722-27 

Nathaniel Weare, Hampton Falls 172 7-2 8 

Andrew Wiggin, Stratham 1728-45 

Nathaniel Rogers, Portsmouth 1745 

Ebenezer Stevens, Kingston 1745-49 

Richard Waldron, Hampton* 1749-52 

Meshech Weare, Hampton Falls 17 52-55 

Henry Sherburne, Jr., Portsmouth 1755-65 

Peter Gilman, Exeter 176 5-71 

John Wentworth, Somersworth 1771-76 

Phillips White, South Hampton 1776 

*His election was vetoed by the governor, but he continued to preside 
during this Assembly. 



MW HAMPSHIKE MANUAL. 185 



Name and Residence. Term Served. 

John Langdon, Portsmouth 1776-82, 86-87 

John Dudley, Raymond 1782-84 

George Atkinson, Portsmouth 17 84-8 5 

John Sullivan, Durham 178 5-86 

John Sparhawk, Portsmouth 1787- 

Thomas Bartlett, Nottingham 1787-91 

William Plumer, Epping 1791-93, 97-98 

Nathaniel Peabody, Atkinson 179 3-9 4 

John Prentice, Langdon 1794-95, 1798-1805 

Russell Freeman, Hanover 1795-97 

Samuel Bell, Chester 1805-07 

Charles Cutts, Portsmouth 1807-09, 10-11 

George B. Upham, Claremont 18 09-10, 15-16 

Clement Storer, Portsmouth 1811-13 

Thomas W. Thompson, Concord 1813-15 

David L. Morrill, Concord 1816-17 

Henry B. Chase, Warner 1817-18 

Matthew Harvey, Hopkinton 1818-21 

Ichabod Bartlett, Portsmouth 1821-22 

Charles Woodman, Bridgewater 1822-2 3 

Andrew Pierce, Dover 1823 

Edmund Parker, Nashua 182 3-2 5 

Levi Woodbury, Portsmouth 1825 

Henry Hubbard, Charlestown 182 5-2 8 

James Wilson, Jr., Keene 1828-29 

James B. Thornton, Merrimack 1829-30 

Samuel Webster, Kingston 183 0-31 

Franklin Pierce, Hillsboro 1831-33 

Charles G. Atherton, Nashua 1833-37 

Ira A. Eastman, Gilmanton 1837-39 

Moses Norris, Jr., Pittsfield 1839-41, 47-48 

John S. Wells, Lancaster 1841-42 

Samuel Swazey, Haverhill 1842-44 

Harry Hibbard, Bath 1844-46 

John P. Hale, Dover 1846-47 

Samuel H. Ayer, Hillsboro 1848-50 

Nathaniel B. Baker, Concord 18 50-52 

George W. Kittredge, Newmarket 18 52-53 

Jonathan E. Sargent, Wentworth 18 53-54 

Francis R. Chase, Northfield 18 54-55 

John J. Prentiss, Claremont 185 5-56 

Edward H. Rollins, Concord 1856-58 

Napoleon B. Bryant, Plymouth 1858-60 

Charles H .Bell, Exeter 1860-61 

Edward A. Rollins, Great Falls 1861-63 

William E. Chandler, Concord 1863-65 

Austin F. Pike, Franklin 1865-67 



186 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



Name and Residence. Term Served. 

Simon G. Griffin, Keene 1867-69 

Samuel M. Wheeler, Dover 1869-71 

William H. Gove, Weare 1871-72 

Asa Fowler, Concord 1872-73 

James Emery, Hudson 1873-74 

Albert R. Hatch, Portsmouth 1874-75 

Charles P. Sanborn, Concord 1875-77 

Augustus A. Woolson, Lisbon 1877-79 

Henry H. Huse, Manchester 1879-81 

Chester B. Jordan, Lancaster 1881-83 

Samuel C. Eastman, Concord 1883-8 5 

Edgar Aldrich, Colebrook 188 5-87 

Alvin Burleigh, Plymouth 1887-89 

Hiram D. Upton, Jaffrey 1889-91 

Frank G. Clarke, Peterboro 1891-93 

Robert N. Chamberlin, Berlin 189 3-9 5 

Stephen S. Jewett, Laconia 189 5-9 7 

James F. Briggs, Manchester 189 7-99 

Frank D. Currier, Canaan 1899-1901 

Cyrus H. Little, Manchester 19 01-03 

Harry M. Cheney, Lebanon 19 03-05 

Rufus N. Elwell, Exeter 19 05-07 

Bertram Ellis, Keene 19 07-09 

Walter W. Scott, Dover 19 09-11 

Frank A. Musgrove, Hanover 1911-13 

William J. Britton, Wolfeboro 1913-15 

Edwin C. Bean, Belmont 1915 

Olin H. Chase, Newport 1915 

Arthur P. Morrill, Concord 1915- 



House of Representatives. 

The house of representatives is the popular branch of the 
legislature, representing the cities and towns. Its size has 
varied from year to year, being a small assembly in the co- 
lonial days and gradually expanding until now it is the largest 
body in any state legislature in the country. The following 
table shows the number of members returned to the legis- 
lature at each session since the Constitution went into effect. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



187 



Year. 


No. 


Year. 1 


No. 


Year. 


No. 


Year. 


No. 


1784-5 


91 


1813-14 


184 


1842-3 


239 


1871-2 


329 


1785-6 


94 


1814-15 


179 


1843-4 


243 


1872-3 


361 


1786-7 


89 


1815-16 


189 


1844-5 


246 


1873-4 


356 


1787-8 


67 


1816-17 


190 


1845-6 


247 


1874-5 


356 


1788-9 


83 


1817-18 


194 


1846-7 


261 


1875-6 


373 


1789-90 


72 


1818-19 


193 


1847-8 


286 


1876-7 


391 


1790-1 


86 


1819-20 


192 


1848-9 


282 


1877-8 


361 


1791-2 


88 


1820-1 


197 


1849-50 


274 


1878-9 


370 


1792-3 


96 


1821-2 


192 


1850-1 


288 


1879-81 


280 


1793-4 


109 


1822-3 


199 


1851-2 


282 


1881-3 


309 


1794-5 


124 


1823-4 


201 


1852-3 


291 


1883-5 


313 


1795-6 


132 


1824-5 


209 


1853-4 


269 


1885-7 


308 


1796-7 


132 


1825-6 


210 


1854-5 


311 


1887-9 


306 


1797-8 


136 


1826-7 


212 


1855-6 


313 


1889-91 


313 


1798-9 


137 


1827-8 


216 


1856-7 


314 


1891-3 


352 


1799-1800 


138 


1828-9 


221 


1857-8 


318 


1893-5 


359 


1800-1 


150 


1829-30 


226 


1858-9 


316 


1895-7 


363 


1801-2 


147 


1830-1 


223 


1859-60 


305 


1897-9 


357 


1802-3 


153 


1831-2 


230 


1860-1 


327 


1899-1901 


359 


1803-4 


154 


1832-3 


228 


1861-2 


319 


1901-3 


397 


1804-5 


159 


1833-4 


227 


1862-3 


321 


1903-5 


393 


1805-6 


162 


1834-5 


203 


1863-4 


329 


1905-7 


391 


1806-7 


160 


1835-6 


226 


1864-5 


331 


1907-9 


391 


1807-8 


165 


1836-7 


232 


1865-6 


328 


1909-11 


387 


1808-9 


164 


1837-8 


226 


1866-7 


326 


1911-13 


393 


1809-10 


171 


1838-9 


247 


18G7-8 


330 


1913-15 


402 


1810-11 


180 


1839-40 


246 


1868-9 


332 


1915-17 


408 


1811-12 


?75 


1840-1 


253 


1869-70 


334 


1917-19 


404 


1812-13 


179 


1841-2 


249 


1870-1 


335 







THE JUDICIARY. 



The Constitution in article 4, part 2, gives the legislature 
full authority to establish courts. There is a supreme court 
and a superior court, each with a chief and four associate 
justices; a probate court in each county, with a probate judge 
and municipal police courts in the cities and most of the 
towns. 

Previous to the Revolution there was a superior court of 
judicature for the province, which sat from 169 3 to 1776, 
eighty-three years. This was succeeded by the superior court 
of judicature, which sat from 1776 to 1813, thirty-seven years. 
The supreme judicial court took its place in 1813 and lasted 
three years, until 1816. Then the superior court of judi- 
cature was re-established and sat until 18 55, thirty-nine years. 
This was succeeded in 18 55 by the supreme judicial court, 
which lasted until 1874, nineteen years. Then the superior 
court of judicature was restored for two years, to be suc- 
ceeded in 1876 by the supreme court, which has since, during 
a period of forty years, been the highest court in the state. 



188 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

The superior court was first known as the court of com- 
mon pleas, which was established in 1813 with two circuits, 
eastern and western. In 1816 the circuits were abolished 
and two districts were established, and in 1820 these were 
merged into the court of sessions. In 1824 the court of com- 
mon pleas was re-established to sit, until in 1833, after an 
existence of nine years, the court went out of existence. In 
1842 the circuit court was re-established without any circuits 
or districts, and it sat for seven years, until 1849, when it 
was abolished. In 18 51 it was again re-established and was 
reorganized in 18 55 and abolished in 1859. It was once 
more re-established in 1874 and lasted two years. In 19 01, 
after a lapse of twenty-five years, a secondary court was estab- 
lished under the name of superior court, which has been 
since maintained. 

The following is a list of the chief justices of the supreme 
court under its various names and organizations from the 
beginning, with the residence and term of service of each chief 
justice. All judges under the Constitution are appointed by 
the governor and council and hold office until they are seventy 
years of age. 

Name of Chief Justice and Residence. Term Served. 

Richard Martin, Porstmouth 16 93-9 4 

Nathaniel Weare, Hampton 1694-96 

Joseph Smith, Hampton 1696-9 7, 98-99 

Peter Coffin, Dover 1697-98, 1705-08 

John Hinckes, Newcastle 1699-1705 

William Vaughan, Portsmouth 1708-16 

John Plaisted, Portsmouth 1716 

Samuel Penhallow, Portsmouth 1716-26 

George Jaffrey, Portsmouth 1726-32, 42-49 

Henry Sherburne, Portsmouth 1732-42 

Ellis Huske, Portsmouth 1749-54 

Theodore Atkinson, Portsmouth 1754-76 

Meshech Weare, Hampton Falls 1776-82 

Samuel Livermore, Holderness 1782-89 

Josiah Bartlett, Kingston 179 

John Pickering, Portsmouth 1790-95 

Simeon Olcott, Charlestown 179 5-1801 

Jeremiah Smith, Exeter 1802-09, 13-16 

Arthur Livermore, Holderness 1809-13 

William M. Richardson, Portsmouth 1816-38 

Joel Parker, Keene 1838-48 

John J. Gilchrist, Charlestown 1848-55 

Andrew S. Woods, Bath 1855 

Ira Perley, Concord 1855-59, 64-69 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 189 

Name of Chief Justice and Residence. Term Served. 

Samuel D. Bell, Manchester 1859-64 

Henry A. Bellows, Concord 1869-73 

J. Everett Sargent, Wentworth 1873-74 

Edmund L. Cushing, Charlestown 1874-76 

Charles Doe, Rollinsford 1876-9 6 

Alonzo P. Carpenter, Concord 1896-98 

Isaac N. Blodgett, Franklin 1898-1902 

Frank N. Parsons, Franklin 19 02- 

The following is a list of the associate justices of the su- 
preme court from the beginning. 

Name of Associate Justice and Residence. Term Served. 

Robert Wadleigh, Exeter 169 3-9 7 

Joseph Smith, Hampton 1693-96 

William Partridge, Portsmouth 1693-96 

Kingsley Hall, Exeter 1696-97, 98-99 

Thomas Packer, Portsmouth 169 6-9 7 

John Gerrish, Dover 1697-98, 99-1714 

Job Alcock, Portsmouth 16 9 7-9 8 

Shadrach Walton, Newcastle 16 98-99 

Richard Hilton, Newmarket 1698-99 

Peter Coffin, Dover 1699-1712 

John Plaisted, Portsmouth 1699-1716, 1717-19 

Mark Hunking, Portsmouth 1712-29 

Samuel Penhallow, Portsmouth 1714-16 

George Jaffrey, Portsmouth 1717-2 6 

Thomas Packer, Portsmouth 1717-2 4 

John Frost, Newcastle 1724-32 

Peter Weare, Hampton Falls 1726-30 

Andrew Wiggin, Stratham 1729-32 

Nathaniel Weare, Hampton 1730-38 

Nicholas Gilman, Exeter 1732-40 

Benjamin Gambling, Portsmouth 1733-37 

Ellis Huske, Portsmouth 1739-49 

Joseph Sherburne, Portsmouth 1739-40 

Samuel Gilman, Exeter 1740-47 

Thomas Millet, Dover 1740-42 

Jotham Odiorne, Newcastle 1742-47 

Thomas Wallingford, Somersworth 1747-71 

Meshech Weare, Hampton Falls 1747-7 5 

Joseph Blanchard, Dunstable 1749-58 

Leverett Hubbard, Portsmouth 1763-85 

William Parker, Portsmouth 1771-75 

Matthew Thornton, Londonderry 1776-82 

John Wentworth, Rollinsford 1776-81 



190 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Name of Associate Justice and Residence. Term Served. 

Woodbury Langdon, Portsmouth 1782-83, 86-91 

Josiah Bartlett, Kingston 1782-9 

William Whipple, Portsmouth 1783-8 5 

John Dudley, Raymond 1784-9 7 

Simeon Olcott, Charlestown 1790-95 

Timothy Farrar, New Ipswich 1791-18 03 

Ebenezer Thompson, Durham 179 5-96 

Daniel Newcomb, Keene 1796-9 8 

Edward S. L. Livermore, Portsmouth 179 7-99 

Paine Wingate, Stratham 179 8-1809 

Arthur Livermore, Holderness 1799-1809, 1813-16 

William K. Atkinson, Dover 18 03-05 

Richard Evans, Portsmouth 1809-13 

Jonathan Steele, Durham 1810-12 

Clifton Claggett, Litchfield 1812-13 

Caleb Ellis, Claremont 1813-16 

Samuel Bell, Chester 1813-16 

Levi Woodbury, Francestown 1816-23 

Samuel Green, Concord 1819-40 

John Harris, Hopkinton 1823-33 

Joel Parker, Keene 1833-38 

Nathaniel G. Upham, Concord 1833-42 

Leonard Wilcox, Orford 1838-40, 48-50 

John J. Gilchrist, Charlestown 1840-48 

Andrew S. Woods, Bath 1840-55 

Ira A. Eastman, Gilmanton 1849-59 

Samuel D. Bell, Manchester 1849-59 

Ira Perley, Concord 1850-52 

Asa Fowler, Concord 1855-61 

George Y. Sawyer, Nashua. ..." 18 55-59 

J. Everett Sargent, Wentworth 1859-73 

Henry A. Bellows, Concord 1859-69 

Charles Doe, Rollinsford 1859-74 

George W. Nesmith, Franklin 1859-70 

William H. Bartlett, Concord 1861-67 

Jeremiah Smith, Dover 1867-74 

William L. Foster, Concord 1869-74, 76-81 

William S. Ladd, Lancaster 1870-76 

Ellery A. Hibbard, Laconia 1873-76 

Isaac W. Smith, Manchester 1874-76, 77-96 

Clinton W. Stanley, Manchester 1876-84 

Aaron W. Sawyer, Nashua 1876-77 

George A. Bingham, Littleton 1876-80, 84-91 

William H. H. Allen, Claremont 1876-93 

Lewis W. Clark, Manchester 1877-98 

Isaac N. Blodgett, Franklin 1880-98 

Alonzo P. Carpenter, Concord 1881-96 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 191 

Name of Associate Justice and Residence. Term Served. 

William M. Chase, Concord 1891-19 07 

Robert M. Wallace, Milford 1893-1901 

Frank N. Parsons, Franklin 189 5-19 02 

Robert G. Pike, Dover 1896-1901 

Robert J. Peaslee, Manchester 1898-1901, 07- 

John E. Young, Exeter 1898-1901, 04- 

Reuben E. Walker, Concord 1901- 

James W. Remick, Concord 19 01-04 

George H. Bingham, Manchester 19 02-13 

William A. Plummer, Laconia 1913- 

The following is a list of the chief justices of the superior 
court under its various names and organizations from the be- 
ginning. When the court had two districts or circuits, from 
1813-21, there was a chief justice in each. 

Name of Chief Justice and Residence. Term Served. 

Timothy Farrar, New Ipswich 1813-16 

William H. Woodward, Hanover 1813-16 

Daniel M. Durrell, Dover 1816-21 

William H. Woodward, Hanover 1816-18 

Roger Vose, Walpole 1818-20 

Arthur Livermore, Holderness 18 2 5-32 

Jonathan Kittridge, Canaan 18 55-59 

William L. Foster, Concord 1874-76 

Robert M. Wallace, Milford 19 01-13 

Robert G. Pike, Dover , 1913- 



( NOTE— There was no court of this kind previous to 1813 or from 1821 
to 1825, from 1832 to 1855, from 1859 to 1874, or from 1876 to 1901.) 



The following is a list of the associate justices of the su- 
perior court from the beginning. 

Name of Justice and Residence. Term Served. 

Oliver Peabody, Exeter 1813-16 

Samuel Hale, Barrington 1813-16 

Richard C. Everett, Lancaster 1813-16 

Nahum Parker, Fitzwilliam 1813-16 

Timothy Farrar, Jr., Hanover 18 24-3 2 



192 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Name of Justice and Residence. Term Served. 

Josiah Butler, Deerfield 182 5-32 

Charles P. Gove, Nashua 1843-47 

Noah Tebbetts, Rochester 1843-44 

Ira A. Eastman, Gilmanton 1844_49 

Leonard Wilcox, Orford 1847-48 

Samuel D. Bell, Manchester 1848-49 

George Y. Sawyer, Nashua 18 51-54 

Charles R. Morrison, Haverhill 1851-55 

Joseph Minot, Concord 18 52-55 

Charles W. Woodman, Dover 1854-55 

Edward L. Cushing, Charlestown 1855 

J. Everett Sargent, Wentworth 1855-59 

Henry F. French, Exeter 1855-59 

Edward D. Rand, Lisbon 1874-76 

Clinton W. Stanley, Manchester 1874-76 

Robert G. Pike, Dover 19 01-13 

Robert J. Peaslee, Manchester 1901-07 

John E. Young, Exeter 1901-04 

Charles F. Stone, Laconia 19 01-10 

Robert N. Chamberlain, Berlin 19 04- 

William A. Plummer, Laconia 1907-13 

John M. Mitchell, Concord 1910-12 

John Kivel, Dover 1913- 

Oliver W. Branch, Manchester 1913- 

William H. Sawyer, Concord 1913- 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

The attorney-general is head of the law department and the 
prosecuting officer and legal adviser of the state. The office 
is provided for in the Constitution, and the attorney-general 
is appointed by the governor and council. Before the Con- 
stitution there was an attorney-general appointed by the gov- 
ernor. In 1915 the office of assistant attorney-general was 
created and the department of inheritance tax collection is in 
the charge of the assistant. The following is a list of the 
attorney-generals from the beginning, with the term served 
by each. 

Name of General and Residence. Term Served. 

Edward Randolph, England 1682-83 

Joseph Rayn, England 16 83-87 

James Graham 1687-9 7 

John Pickering, Portsmouth 169 7-1726, 27-36 

Thomas Phipps, Portsmouth 1726-27 










V 



i_# Mil mml § J 
mi .j.j mm -_,■ 



\ 




NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 193 



Name of General and Residence. Term Served. 

Matthew Livermore, Portsmouth 1736-6 5 

Wyseman Claggett, Litchfield 1765-69, 76-78, 81-82 

Samuel Livermore, Holderness 1769-76, 78-81 

John Sullivan, Durham 1782-86 

Benjamin West, Charlestown 1786-87 

John Prentice, Londonderry 1787-93 

Joshua Atherton, Amherst 179 3-1801 

William Gordon, Amherst 18 01-02 

Jeremiah Mason, Portsmouth 1802-05 

George Sullivan, Exeter 1805-06, 15-35 

Samuel Bell, Francestown 1806-07 

William K. Atkinson, Dover 1807-12 

Daniel French, Chester 1812-15 

Charles F. Gove, Nashua 1835-43 

Lyman B. Walker, Gilford 1843-47 

John S. Wells, Exeter 1847-48 

John Sullivan, Exeter 1848-63 

William C. Clarke, Manchester 1863-72 

Lewis W. Clark, Manchester 1872-76 

Mason W. Tappan, Bradford 1876-87 

Daniel Barnard, Franklin 1887-92 

Edwin G. Eastman, Exeter 1892-1911 

James P. Tuttle, Manchester 1911- 

Assistant Attorney-General. 

Joseph S. Matthews, Concord 1915- 

THE BANK COMMISSION. 

The bank commission was created by the legislature in 
1837, and consisted of three commissioners, appointed one 
each year for terms of three years. Examination of banks 
before that was performed by legislative committees, and as 
early as 1814 banks made returns of their condition to the 
governor and council, who submitted them to the legislature. 
The legislative committees and the early bank commissions 
had supervision only over banks of issue and discount, but in 
1841 their activities extended to cover savings banks. 

In 1881 the number of commissioners was reduced from 
three to two and the terms of office increased from one year 
to two. In 1913 the number was further reduced from two 
to one and the office of deputy commissioner was created. In 
1915 the number of commissioners was restored to three and 
the term of office lengthened to six years. 

The following is a list of commissioners from the begin- 
ning, with the residence of and term served by each. 



194 NEW HAMPSHIKE MANUAL. 

Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

Jonathan Harvey, Sutton 1837-40 

John Chadwick, Middleton 1837-40 

James Clark, Franklin 1837-38 

Jotham Lawrence, Exeter 1838-40 

John S. Wells, Lancaster 1840 

James M. R. Wilkins, Bedford 1840 

Andrew S. Woods, Bath 1840 

Leonard Wilcox, Orford 1840 

Amos Tuck. Exeter 1841-44 

James M. Rix, Lancaster 1842-46, 47-54 

John H. Steele, Peterborough 1843 

Titus Brown, Francestown 1843-46 

Ira St. Clair, Deerfield 1844-46, 47-48 

Henry B. Chase, Warner 1846-47 

Simeon B. Johnson, Littleton 1846-47 

Horace L. Hazleton, Meredith 1846-47 

Frederick Vose, Walpole 1847-54 

Henry F. French, Exeter 1848-54 

George F. Starkweather, Keene 1854-55 

Henry F. Wendall, Portsmouth 1854-55 

John G. Sinclair, Bethlehem 1854-55 

John L. Rix, Haverhill 1855-58 

George C. Peavey, Strafford 18 55-58 

Charles J. Amidon, Hinsdale 1855-58 

Daniel P. Wheeler, Orford 1858-61 

Cyrus K. Sanborn, Rochester 1858-61 

George W. Pinkerton, Manchester 1858-61 

Charles H. Powers, Jaffrey. 1861-66 

Nathaniel H. Sanborn, Franklin 1861-63 

John Peavey, Tuftonboro 1861-64 

Cornelius V. Dearborn, Peterborough 1863-66 

Elijah Wadleigh, Wakefield 1864-66 

Henry O. Kent, Lancaster 1866-68 

Charles W. Johnson, Manchester 1866-67 

Jacob G. Cilley, Manchester 1866-69 

William W. Hayes, Farmington 1867-70 

Nathan S. Johnson, Newbury 186 8-71 

Moses R. Emerson, Claremont 1869-71, 72-74 

Noah Tebbetts, Rochester 1870-71 

Amos L. Jenness, Deerfield 1871-72, 74-76 

Alonzo J. Fogg, Concord . 1871-72, 75-76 

Frank Kimball, Andover 1871-72 

Joseph M. Folsom, Belmont 1872, 74-76 

John D. Lyman, Exeter 1872-76, 80-83 

Buel C. Carter, Rollinsford 1872-76, 81-86 

Frank A. McKean, Nashua 1874-75 

Leander W. Cogswell, Henniker 1876-81 



MW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 195 

Name of Commissioner and Eesidence. Term Served. 

John G. Kimball, Nashua 1876-80 

Amos J. Blake, Fitzwilliam 1876-8 

William H. Berry, Pittsfield 188 0-81 

George E. Gage, Manchester 1883-87 

Charles E. Cooper, Hinsdale 1886-8 7 

James O. Lyford, Concord 1887-95, 1915- 

Alonzo I. Nute, Farmington 18 87-90 

William A. Heard, Sandwich 1889-93 

Alpheus W. Baker, Lebanon 189 0-05 

John Hatch, Greenland , 189 3-04 

Thomas J. Walker, Concord 1895-9 8 

George W. Cummings, Francestown 189 8-19 04 

Richard M. Scammon, Stratham 19 04-14 

Arthur E. Dole, Concord 19 04-13 

Henry F. Green, Littleton 19 05-11 

Thomas F. Johnson, Colebrook 1911-13 

George E. Farrand, Concord 1914-15 

Frederic S. Nutting, Manchester 1915- 

Guy H. Cutter, Jaffrey 1915- 



PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION. 

The public service commission was formerly known as the 
railroad commission, and was created by the legislature 
seventy-two years ago, in 1844. Previous to that there had 
been a regulation of railroads by the state and as early as 1838 
a law was passed authorizing the governor and council to 
appoint three commissioners in each county. The first state 
commission, however, was named in 1844, and in 1855 election 
by popular vote was substituted for appointment. In 18 83 
election was abolished and appointment restored. In 1911 
the name was changed to public service commission and the 
powers and duties of the board enlarged. Previous to 1911 
commissioners were appointed or elected one at a time for 
three-year terms, but since that year the term has been six 
years. Special commissioners have served from time to time, 
but were not regarded as members of the state board and 
are not listed below in the following list of commissioners 
from the beginning, with the residence of each and term 
served. 

Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

Charles J. Fox, Nashua 1838-45 

Edmund Elliot, Exeter 1844-45 

Harvey Huntoon, Unity 1845-46 

Titus Brown, Francestown 1845-49 



196 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

Elijah R. Currier, Newton 1845-50 

Samuel Garfield, Langdon 1846-49 

James W. Weeks, Lancaster 1849-54 

Asa P. Cate, Northfield 1849-55 

Stephen W. Dearborn, Exeter 18 51-57 

Benjamin H. Plaisted, Jefferson 1854-56 

Francis H. Lyford, Manchester 18 55-58 

Greenleaf Cummings, Lisbon 18 56-59 

Jeremy O. Nute, Farmington 1857-60 

Archibald H. Dunlap, Nashua 18 58-61 

Merril C. Forrest, Berlin 1859-62 

Jeremiah C. Tilton, Sanbornton 1861-64 

Jonathan T. P. Hunt, Manchester 1861-64 

Dixi Crosby, Hanover 1862-65 

David H. Buff urn, Somersworth 1863-66 

Person C. Cheney, Peterborough 1864-67 

Milan W. Harris, Dublin 1865-68 

George D. Savage, Alton 1866-69 

Jesse Gault, Hooksett 1867-70 

James W. Johnson, Enfield 1868-70 

Samuel D. Quarles, Ossipee 1869-72 

Charles P. Gage, Nashua 1870-73 

D. W. Buckminster, Keene 1870-71 

David Gilchrist, Franklin 1871-74 

Albert S. Twitchell, Gorham 1872-75 

Edward P. Hodsdon, Dover 1873-76 

Alvah W. Sulloway, Franklin 1874-77 

Charles H. Powers, Jaffrey 1875-78 

William A. Pierce, Portsmouth 1876-79 

Granville P. Conn, Concord 1877-80 

David E. Williard, Orford 1878-80 

James E. French, Moultonborough 1879-82 

Charles A. Smith, Manchester 1880-82 

Edward J. Tenney, Claremont 1880-8 7 

Benning W. Hoyt 1882-83 

Stillman Humphrey, Concord 1882-83 

Orrin C. Moore, Nashua 1883-86 

E. B. S. Sanborn, Franklin 1883-88, 94-1904 

Henry M. Putney, Manchester 1886-19 09 

Benjamin F. Prescott, Epping 1887-9 4 

John M. Mitchell, Concord 1888-91 

Thomas Cogswell, Gilmanton 1891-94 

Josiah G. Bellows, Walpole 1894-19 01 

Francis C. Faulkner, Keene 1901-03 

Arthur G. Whittemore, Dover 19 03-11 

George E. Bales, Wilton 19 04-11 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 197 



Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

Oscar L. Young, Laconia 19 09-11 

Edward C. Niles, Concord 1911- 

John E. Benton, Keene 1911-15 

Thomas W. D. Worthen, Hanover 1911- 

William T. Gunnison, Rochester 1915- 



THE INSURANCE DEPARTMENT. 

The insurance department is conducted by an insurance 

commissioner appointed by the governor and council for 
a three-year term. The commission was created by the legis- 
lature in 1851, to consist of three commissioners. In 1869 a 
single commissioner was substituted. The following is a list 
of commissioners from the beginning, with the term which 
each served. 

Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

Uri Lamprey, Hampton 18 52-5 5 

Warren L. Lane, Manchester 18 52-56 

Charles F. Brooks, Westmoreland 18 52-53 

Timothy Hoskins, Westmoreland 18 53-56 

John E. Stanyon, Kingston 1855-56 

Albert S. Scott, Peterboro 1856-59 

Jacob H. Ela, Rochester 1856-59 

George W. Conant, Enfield 1856-57, 62-63 

Lorenzo Day, Enfield 1857-59 

Oliver C. Fisher, Henniker 1&59-61 

Otis F. R. Waite, Claremont 1859-61 

Benjamin M. Colby, Sanbornton 18 59-61 

C. V. Dearborn, Peterboro 1862-6 3 

James Gordon, Laconia 186 2-6 5 

F. S. Greenleaf, Manchester 186 4-66 

Joseph Gilman, Tamworth 186 5-6 7 

E. M. Topliff, Manchester 1866-68 

John Felch, Sunapee 1866-69 

A. B. Wyatt, Sanbornton 186 8-70 

Francis Winch, Nashua 1868-70 

Oliver Pillsbury, Concord 1870-88 

Henry H. Huse, Manchester 188 8-9 

John C. Linehan, Concord 1890-1905 

George H. Adams, Plymouth 19 05-11 

Robert J. Merrill, Claremont 1911-14, 15- 

Joseph Warren, Rochester 1915- 



198 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



FISH AND GAME DEPARTMENT. 

The fish and game department was created in 1865 by the 
legislature after an investigation had been made of the sub- 
ject by a select committee on fisheries. The members of the 
select committee were A. Herbert Bellows of Walpole, John 
C. Bickford of Manchester, Edward P. Parker of Littleton, 
Harry Bingham of Littleton, Samuel H. Quincy and William 
H. Hackett of Portsmouth; Joseph Q. Roles and James P. 
Upham of Manchester; and George W. Sumner and Edward 
Spaulding of Nashua. 

The commission consisted of two members until 1874, when 
it was increased to three. In 1913 the department was re- 
organized and the number of commissioners decreased from 
three to one. The following is a list of the commissioners 
from the beginning, with the residence and term served of 
each: 

Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

A. Herbert Bellows, Walpole 1866-71 

Winborn A. Sanborn, Gilford 1866-71, 73-76 

Thomas E. Hatch, Greenland 1871-73, 74-76 

William W. Fletcher, Concord 1871-76 

Oliver H. Noyes, Henniker 1876-77 

John S. Wadleigh, Laconia 1876-77 

Andrew C. Fifield, Andover 1876-77 

Samuel Webber, Charlestown 1877-83 

Albina H. Powers, Grantham 1877-83 

Luther H. Hayes, Milton 1877-89 

George W. Riddle, Manchester 1883-93 

Elliott B. Hodge, Plymouth 1883-93 

John H. Kimball, Marlborough 1889-92 

Willard H. Griffin, Henniker 1892-96 

William H. Shurtleff, Lancaster 1893-1902 

Nathaniel Wentworth, Hudson 1893-1913 

F. L. Hughes, Ashland 1896-1902 

Charles B. Clarke, Concord 19 02-13 

Merrill Shurtleff, Lancaster 19 02-10 

Frank P. Brown, Whitefield 1910-13 

Frank J. Beal, Plymouth 1913-16 

George A. Mclntyre, Milford 1916- 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

The department of public instruction was created by the 
legislature in 1867, and the superintendent of public in- 
struction is its active head. In 1913 there was a reorgani- 



STEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 199 



ation of the department, so that the superintendent holds office 
indefinitely. 

The following is a list of the superintendents from the 
beginning, together with the residence of each and the term 
served: 

Name of Superintendent and Residence. Term Served. 

Amos Hadley, Concord 1868-70 

Anthony C. Hardy, Hinsdale 1870-72 

John W. Simonds, Andover 1872-73, 74-77 

Daniel G. Beede 1873-74 

Charles A. Downs, Lebanon 1877-81 

James W. Patterson, Hanover 1881-92 

Fred Gowing, Nashua 1892-9 7 

Channing Folsom, Newmarket 1897-1904 

Henrjr C. Morrison, Concord 19 04- 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

The department of agriculture was established by the legis- 
lature in 1870 and a board of agriculture was appointed, with 
a secretary as the active head. In 1913 the board was re- 
placed by an agricultural commissioner, and in 1915 the de- 
partment was again reorganized with a commissioner. The 
following is a list of the secretaries of the board of agri- 
culture and the agricultural commissioners, from the begin- 
ning, together with the residence of each and the term served. 

Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

James O. Adams, Boscawen 1871-87 

Nahum J. Bachelder, Andover 18 87-1913 

Daniel W. Badger, Portsmouth 1913-14 

Andrew L. Felker, Meredith 1914- 

COMMISSION OF PHARMACY AND PRACTICAL 
CHEMISTRY. 

The commission of pharmacy and practical chemistry was 
created by the legislature in 1875. It consists of three com- 
missioners, appointed one each year for three-year terms by 
the governor and council. The following is a list of the com- 
missioners from the beginning, together with the residence 
of each and the term served: 



200 NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 

Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

Charles A. Tufts, Dover 1875-96 

Elias S. Russell, Nashua 1875-82 

Charles S. Eastman, Concord 1875-83 

Edward H. Currier, Manchester 1882-1912 

Charles P. Hildreth, Allenstown 1883-89 

George F. Underhill, Concord 1889-19 05 

Ben O. Aldrich, Keene 1896-1910 

Frank H. Wingate, Nashua 19 06-11 

Albert S. Wetherell, Exeter 1910-13, 15- 

Herbert E. Rice, Nashua 1911- 

Eugene Sullivan, Concord 1912-15 

Paul H. Boire, Manchester 1913- 

THE TAX COMMISSION. 

The tax commission was formerly known as the board of 
equalization, and was created in 1878. There were five com- 
missioners appointed for two-year terms by the supreme 

court. In 1911 the name was changed to tax commission, 
the membership was reduced from five to three, and the tenure 
of office increased from two to five years. The following list 

gives the names, place of residence and term of service of the 
commissioners from the beginning: 

Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

Bolival Lovell, Alstead 1879-80 

Edwin W. Drew, Stewartstown 1879-94 

Jewett Connor, Exeter 1879-94 

William Butterfield, Concord 1879-84 

John M. Parker, Goffstown 1879-19 00 

E. S. Cutter, Nashua 1880-83 

Charles A. Dole, Lebanon 1883-1901 

John M. Hill, Concord 1884-1900 

Edwin Snow, Eaton 1894-1907 

Charles McDaniel, Springfield 1895-1911 

George W. Sanborn, East Kingston 1900-11 

Orange S. Brown, Rollinsford 1901-03 

William B. Fellows, Tilton 1901-08, 11- 

Freeman Higgins, Manchester 19 03-09 

John R. Eastman, Andover 1907-11 

E. P. Thompson, Laconia 19 08-11 

Sherman E. Burroughs, Manchester. ...... 1909-11 

Albert O. Brown, Manchester 1911- 

John T. Amey, Lancaster 1911- 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 201 



THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 

The board of health was established by the legislature in 
1881. The personnel consists of the governor and attorney- 
general, by virtue of their offices, a civil engineer, and three 
physicians. The active head of the department is the secre- 
tary, who is chosen by the board, and he is registrar of vital 
statistics, with authority to enforce the registration laws. 

In 1889 a law was enacted making the board of health a 
board of commissioners of lunacy, and in 1899 the board was 
constituted a board of examiners of embalmers. In 19 01 
the laboratory of hygiene was established, under the authority 
and management of the board of health. 

The members of the board from its organization to the 
present time have been, with the name, residence and term 
served by each: 

Governor and attorney-general, ex officiis 

James A. Weston, C. E., Manchester 18 81-9 5 

Granville P. Conn, M. D., Concord 1881-1913 

Carl H. Horsch, M. D., Dover 1881-86 

Irving A. Watson, M. D., Concord 1881- 

Elwin T. Hubbard, Rochester 18 86-87 

William H. Bragdon, M. D., Conway 1887-89 

John J. Berry, M. D., Portsmouth 1889-9 5 

Robert Fletcher, C. E., Hanover 189 5- 

Charles S. Collins, M. D., Nashua 1895-1911 

Frank E. Kittredge, M. D., Nashua 1911-15 

Dennis E. Sullivan, M. D., Concord 1913- 

George C. Wilkins, M. D., Manchester 1915- 

( NOTE— Civil engineers are indicated by the letters "C E." and 
physicians by "M. D.") 



FORESTRY DEPARTMENT. 

The forestry department was created by the legislature in 
1881, and the governor and seven others served as the first 
forestry commission. In 1889 the commission was reduced 
to three members, appointed by the governor and council. In 
189 3 a commission of four, two members of each political 
party, was created to serve for terms of four years, one seat 
becoming vacant annually, and appointments were made by 
the governor and council. The office of secretary of the com- 
mission was created, one of the commissioners being salaried 
secretary and active head of the department. The governor 
was a commissioner by virtue of his office. In 1909 the de- 



202 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



partment was reorganized and reduced to three in number, 
who are appointed by the governor and council, one each year 
for a term of three years. The governor is not a commis- 
sioner, and instead of an active secretary the commission ap- 
points a forester, who serves at the pleasure of the commission. 
Edgar C. Hirst of Concord has been forester since the office 
was created. Following is a list of the commissioners from 
the beginning, with the residence of each and the term served: 

Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

Henry G. Jesup, Hanover 1881-89 

Joseph B. Walker, Concord 1881-93 

William W. Hills, Plaistow 1881-89 

Joseph B. Barnard, Hopkinton 1881-89 

William S. Ladd, Lancaster 1881-89 

Ithiel E. Clay, Chatham 1881-89 

William F. Flint, Winchester 1881-89 

George B. Chandler, Manchester 1889-1901 

Jonathan B. Harrison, Franklin 1889-93 

Napoleon B. Bryant, Andover 189 3-19 02 

James F. Colby, Hanover 1893-99 

George H. Moses, Concord 1893-1907 

George E. Bales, Wilton 1899-1905 

Henry O. Kent, Lancaster 19 01-09 

Marshall C. Wentworth, Jackson 19 02-05 

Jason E. Tolles, Nashua 1905- 

Robert P. Bass, Peterborough 19 05-11 

Robert E. Faulkner, Keene 1907-09, 12-13 

William R. Brown, Berlin 1909- 

George B. Leighton, Dublin 1911-12, 15- 

Benjamin F. Greer, Goffstown 1913-15 



DEPARTMENT OF RECORDS. 

The department of records was created in 1883, and is 
under the administration of the indexer of records. The office 
is unofficially connected with the headquarters of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, and the indexer is by virtue of his office 
clerk of the printing commission. The following is a list of 
the indexers from the beginning, with the residence of and 
term served by each: 

Name of Indexer and Residence. Term Served. 

Edward Aiken, Milford 1883-97 

D. K. Foster, Pittsfield 1897-98 

Frank Battles, Concord 1898- 



XEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 203 



THE DENTAL BOARD. 

The dental board was created by the legislature in 1891 
and known as the board of registration in dentistry until 
1913, when the name was changed. It consists of three den- 
tists appointed by the governor and council for three-year 
terms. The members of the board from the beginning, to- 
gether with the residence of each and the term served, are in 
the following list: 

Name of Member and Residence. Term Served. 

William Jarvis, Claremont 1891-9 7 

F. H. Lunt, Rochester 1891-9 6 

Edward B. Davis, Concord 1891-9 5 

E. B. Cushing, Laconia 1896-99 

William R. Biackstone, Manchester 1896-1904 

George A. Bowers, Nashua 1897- 

Fred H. Brown, Lebanon 189 9-19 08 

Andrew J. Sawyer, Manchester 19 04-14 

Herbert R. Beals, Keene 19 08-14 

Clarence S. Copeland, Rochester 1914- 

Harry L. Watson, Manchester 1914- 



BALLOT LAW COMMISSION. 

The ballot law commission was created by the legislature in 
1891, and consists of a member of each of the two leading 
political parties, appointed by the governor and council every 
other year, previous to the state primary election, to consider 
and decide election and primary disputes. The attorney-gen- 
eral is the third member of the commission by virtue of his 
office. The following is a list of the commissioners from the 
beginning, with the residence of each, the party represented 
and the term served: 

Name, Residence and Party. Term Served. 

Henry E. Burnham, Manchester, Republican 18 9 2-9 8 

Irving W. Drew, Lancaster, Democrat 189 2-9 8 

Edwin D. Ward, Laconia, Republican 18 9 8-19 00 

John B. Nash, Conway, Democrat 189 8-19 00 

Thomas F. Johnson, Colebrook, Republican 19 00-04 

John P. Bartlett, Manchester, Democrat. . . 19 00-04 

Walter D. H. Hill, Conway, Republican. . . . 19 04-06 

Albert S. Wait, Newport, Democrat 19 04-06 

John C. Bickford, Manchester, Republican. 19 06-12 

Charles C. Rogers, Tilton, Democrat 19 06- 

Charles A. Perkins, Manchester, Republican 1912-14 

Frank J. Sulloway, Concord, Republican. . . 1914- 



204 NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



BUREAU OF LABOR. 

The bureau of labor was created by the legislature in 189 3 
and the labor commissioner is its head. It was reorganized 
in 1911 and a board of arbitration and conciliation created in 
1913 to work with the bureau. The commissioner is ap- 
pointed by the governor and council for a three-year term; 
and members of the board are appointed, one to represent 
capital, one to represent labor and one to represent the people, 
all appointed for three-year terms, one each year. 

The following is a list of the commissioners from the begin- 
ning, with the residence of each and the term served: 

Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

John W. Bourlet, Concord 1893-95 

Julian F. Trask, Laconia 189 5-99 

Lysander H. Carroll, Concord 1899-1911 

John S. B. Davie, Concord 1911- 

The following is a list of the members of the board of arbi- 
tration and conciliation, together with the residence and the 
interests each represents and the term served: 

Name, Residence and Interest. Term Served. 

John H. Neal, Portsmouth, the People 1913- 

Francis J. Hurley, Manchester, Labor 1913-16 

George A. Tenney, Claremont, Capital 1913- 

Michael F. Connolly, Manchester, Labor. ... 1916- 



DEPARTMENT OF CHARITIES AND CORRECTION. 

The department of charities and correction was created by 
the legislature in 189 5, and a board of seven members con- 
ducts the department. One member is the secretary of the 
board of health by virtue of his office and the other six are 
appointed by the governor and council for five-year terms. 

The board employs a secretary, who is the active head of 
the department. The following is a list of the secretaries 
from the beginning, with the term which each served: 

Name of Secretary and Residence. Term Served. 

Julia R. Carpenter, Concord 189 5-96 

Oliver J. M. Gilman, Alton 1896-19 00 

Lilian C. Streeter, Concord 1900-01 

William J. Ahern, Concord 19 01- 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 205 



BOARD OF MEDICAL EXAMINERS. 

The board of medical examiners was created by the legis- 
lature in 1897 and consisted of fifteen members, appointed 
three each year for terms of five years by the governor and 
council, five upon nomination by the New Hampshire Medical 
society, five by the New Hampshire Homeopathic Medical so- 
ciety and five by the New Hampshire Eclectic society. In 
1915 the membership was reduced from fifteen to five and 
nominations by the societies was abolished. 

The following is a list of the examiners from the beginning, 
with the residence of each and the term served: 

Name of Examiner and Residence. Term Served. 

George H. Shedd (medical), Conway 1897- 

George Cook (medical), Concord 1897-1915 

Arthur C. Heffinger (medical), Portsmouth 189 7-1915 

James T. Greeley (medical), Nashua 1897-1912 

John F. Robinson (medical), Manchester. . 1897-1914 

Robert H. Hazelton (homeopathic) , Lebanon 1897-1903 

George W. Flagg (homeopathic), Keene. . . 1897-1909 

Arthur J. Todd (homeopathic), Manchester 1897-1911 

R. V. Sweet (homeopathic), Rochester.... 1897-1915 

G. H. Morrison (homeopathic), Whitefield . 1897-1903 

E. C. Chase (eclectic), Orford 1897-1907 

F. R. Gerald (eclectic), Laconia 1897-1914 

W. H. True (eclectic), Laconia 1897-06, 07-15 

W. F. Templeton (eclectic), Manchester... 1897-1902 

Enos Huckins (eclectic), Plymouth 1897-1903 

Lester R. Brown (eclectic), Winchester. . . . 19 02-15 

A. K. V. Harvey (homeo.), Somersworth. . 1903-08 

Henry M. Wiggin (homeopathic), Whitefield 19 03- 

A. J. Marston (eclectic), Plymouth 19 03-15 

Channing Bishop (homeopathic), Bristol. . 1908-15 

George R. Smith (homeopathic), Dover... 1909-15 

Howard N. Kingsford (medical), Hanover 1912- 

Charles W. Adams (homeopathic), Franklin 1911- 

George S. Foster (medical), Manchester. . . 1914-15 

A. S. Russell (eclectic), Rumney 1914-15 

William R. Garland (eclectic), Plymouth.. 1914-15 

Walter T. Crosby, Manchester 1915- 

VETERINARY EXAMINING BOARD. 

The veterinary examining board was established by the leg- 
islature in 19 01, and consists of three members, appointed by 
the governor and council for three-year terms. In 1915 the 
law governing the use of the title of veterinary surgeon was 



206 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

elaborated. The following is a list of the members of the 
examining board from the beginning, with the residence of 
each and the term served: 

Name of Examiner and Residence. Term Served. 

Fred L. Bodwell, Dover 1901-13 

Roger I. Twombly, Berlin 19 01-09 

Samuel L. Wadsworth, Keene 1902-04 

Guy E. Chesley, Rochester 19 04- 

Robert P. Moore, Laconia 1909- 

George D. Darrah, Manchester 1913- 

PRINTING COMMISSION. 

The printing commission was created by the legislature in 
19 01, and consists of five officers of the government appointed 
by the governor and council for two years at a time. The 
indexer of records is, by virtue of his office, clerk and active 
head of the commission, but previous to 1913 the commission 
chose one of its members clerk. The following is a list of 
the commissioners from the begnining, with the residence of 
each and the term served: 



Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

Edwin G. Eastman, Exeter 19 01-11 

Albert S. Batchellor, Littleton 19 01-11 

John H. Riedell, Manchester 19 01-11, 18-15 

Harry M. Cheney, Lebanon 1901-04 

James M. Cooper, Concord 19 01-05 

Harrie E. Waite, Concord 19 04-09 

J. Wesley Plummer, Concord 1905-13 

George H. Adams, Plymouth 19 09-11 

Edward C. Niles, Concord 1911-13 

Richard M. Scammon, Stratham 1911-13 

Henry W. Keyes, Haverhill 1911-13 

William B. Fellows, Tilton 1911-13 

Frank A. Musgrove, Hanover 1913-14 

George E. Farrand, Concord 1913-15 

Frank Battles, Concord 1913- 

George W. Fowler, Pembroke 1913-15 

Guy H. Cutter, Jaffrey 1914- 

Hobart Pillsbury, Manchester 1915- 

Arthur L. Willis, Concord 1915-16 

Arthur H. Chase, Concord 1915- 

Olin H. Chase, Newport 1916- 



NEW HAMPSHIKE MANUAL. 207 



EXCISE COMMISSION. 

The excise commission was established by the legislature in 
19 03, when local option was substituted for prohibition in the 
regulation of the liquor traffic and was called the license com- 
mission. In 1913 and again in 1915 the commission was re- 
organized, and in 1915 the name changed to excise commis- 
sion. The following is a list of the commissioners from the 
beginning, with the residence of each and the term served: 

Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

Cyrus H. Little, Manchester 19 03-13 

Henry W. Keyes, Haverhill 1903-13, 15-16 

John Kivel, Dover 19 03-13 

Edmund Sullivan, Berlin 1913-15 

William J. Britton, Wolfeboro 1913-15 

Augustus A. E. Brien, Manchester 1913-15 

Robert Jackson, Concord 1915- 

Frank W. Ordway, Milford 1915- 

Dwight Hall, Dover 1916- 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

The highway department was created by the legislature in 
19 05 and reorganized in 1915. Its head is a highway com- 
missioner appointed for five years by the governor and coun- 
cil. From 1905 to 1915 the commissioner was known as 
superintendent of highways, and for two years previous to the 
creation of the department there was an engineer who per- 
formed the duties of superintending the highways. The fol- 
lowing is a list of the men who have held the office of engi- 
neer, superintendent or commissioner from the beginning, 
with the residence of each and the term served: 

Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

John W. Storrs, Concord 19 03-05 

Arthur W. Dean, Nashua 19 05-09 

Harry C. Hill, Concord 1909-12 

S. Percy Hooker, Concord 1912-14 

Fred E. Everett, Concord 1915- 

OPTOMETRY BOARD. 

The board of registration in optometry was created by the 
legislature in 1911, and consists of three optometrists, a phy- 
sician and an oculist appointed by the governor and council, 
one each year, for five-year terms. The following is a list of 
the members from the beginning, with the residence of each 
and the term served. 



208 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Name of Member and Residence. Term Served. 

George H. Brown, Manchester 1911- 

William E. Wright, Keene 1911- 

Evariste C. Tremblay, Manchester 1911- 

Charles A. Sturtevant, Manchester 1911-13 

C. Howard Edmonds, Claremont 1911-14 

Claude M. Snedon, Littleton 1913- 

James S. Shaw, Franklin 1914- 

DEPARTMENT OF INSTITUTIONS. 

The department of institutions was created in 1913 and re- 
organized in 1915, and includes the government of five in- 
stitutions, the prison, hospital, sanatarium for consumptives, 
industrial school and school for feeble-minded children. Ten 
trustees appointed by the governor and council, two each year 
for five-year terms, conduct the department, and each institu- 
tion has two trustees who devote their attention especially to 
it. The trustees employ a purchasing agent, who does the 
buying for the department and for all other state departments 
in the state house, and for such other state or semi-public in- 
stitutions as shall request the trustees for the privilege of 
coming in under the organization. The soldiers' home has 
its buying done by the purchasing agent. From 1913 to 1915 
the department was governed by a board of control. The 
following is a list of the members of the board of control and 
the trustees who succeeded it, with the residence of each and 
the term served. 

Name of Trustee and Residence. Term Served. 

Samuel D. Felker, governor, Rochester. . . . 1913-15 

George W. Fowler, purchasing agent, Pem- 
broke 1913-15 

William J. Ahern, secretary of the depart- 
ment of charities and correction, Concord 1913-15 

Benjamin W. Couch, Concord 1913-15 

George W. McGregor, Littleton 1913-15 

George H. Warren, chairman and industrial 

school, Manchester 1915- 

John G. M. Glessner, secretary and prison, 

Bethlehem 1915- 

James E. French, hospital, Moultonborough 1915- 

Stillman H. Baker, hospital, Hillsborough. . 1915- 

Lyford A. Merrow, prison, Ossipee 1915- 

Dr. William E. Lawrence, sanatorium, 

Haverhill 1915- 

Albert J. Precourt, sanatorium, Manchester 1915- 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 209 

Abram W. Mitchell, industrial school, Ep- 

ping 1915- 

Rev. John J. Brophy, feeble-minded school, 

Concord 1915- 

William H. Moses, feeble-minded school, 

Tilton 1915- 

Henry K. Libby (not a member), purchas- 
ing agent, Goffstown 1915- 

THE PRISON. 

The old prison was built in 1812 and the present prison in 
1880, and is governed by a warden appointed by the trustees 
of institutions. From 1913 to 1915 the prison was under the 
board of control, which was abolished. Previous to 1913 
there was usually a board of prison trustees, who acted under 
the governor and council and by their appointment. 

The following is a list of the wardens since the prison was 
built, with the term served by each. 

Name of Warden. Term Served. 

Trueworthy J. Dearborn 1812-18 

Moses C. Pillsbury 1818-26, 37-40 

Daniel Connor 1826-29 

Abner J. Stinson 1829-34 

John McDaniels 1834-37 

Lawson Coolidge 1840-43 

Samuel J. Berry 1843-47 

James Moore 1847-50 

Rufus Dow 1850-53 

Gideon Webster 1853-55 

William W. Eastman 1855-59 

John Foss ' 1859-65 

Joseph Mayo 186 5-70 

John C. Pillsbury 1870-80 

Frank Dodge 1880-87 

J. Horace Kent 1887-88 

George W. Colbath 1888-94 

Nahum Robinson 1894-96 

Charles E. Cox 1896-1905 

Henry W. K. Scott 19 05-13 

Charles H. Rowe 1913- 

THE HOSPITAL. 

The first legislative act to provide personal care for the in- 
sane was passed in 1822, providing that any insane person 



210 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

who had committed a crime and was not guilty by reason of 
insanity, and who would be dangerous to be at large, should 
be committed by court to prison until restored or discharged 
by due process of law. Soon after this, agitation throughout 
the state developed for some better method of care and treat- 
ment of the insane. Newspapers enlisted in the cause. In 
1836 the legislature passed an act requesting the governor to 
issue a precept to the selectmen of the towns "to take the 
sense of the qualified voters on the following question: Is it 
expedient for the state to grant an appropriation to build an 
insane hospital?" So successful was this appeal that not only 
were private funds raised, but in 1838 an act of incorporation 
was passed, entitled "An Act to incorporate 'The New Hamp- 
shire Asylum for the Insane.' " 

The management of the institution was at first semi-private 
and public, and was vested in a board of trustees, represented 
in part by the donors and in part by appointees selected by 
the governor and council, under an act of the legislature of 
1839. In the following year, 1840, the legislature repealed 
the act providing for mutual representation of the donors and 
the state on the board of trustees, and providing that all trus- 
tees should be appointed by the state. With this act of legisla- 
tion of 1840 the erection of an asylum for the insane was 
assured, and the trustees, with the assistance of state and 
private aid, began the erection of an institution at Concord, 
which was opened in 1843. 

The early construction of the hospital was after the plan of 
the solid or block type of building. In the case of the asylum 
there was an administration center, with wings extending 
from either side. Additional wings have from time to time 
been added to the original unit, as the exigencies demanded. 
Modern construction calls for the erection of detached groups 
of buildings, and in 1882 the first detached building was 
erected for the care of convalescent, appreciative and intel- 
ligent women patients, and is known as the Bancroft building. 

From this latter date various events in the history of the 
hospital have followed each other in rapid sequence, as the 
following chronological happenings indicate: 

Training School for Nurses 1888 

Walker Cottage at Lake Penacook 1892 

Workshop for Men 1892 

Twitchell House 1895 

Nurses' Home 19 00 

Change of name from New Hampshire Asylum for the 

Insane to New Hampshire State Hospital 1901 

State Care Act, authorizing removal of dependent in- 
sane from almshouses to state hospital 1903 

North and South Pavilions 1904 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 211 

Hospital Building 19 06 

Heat, Light and Power Plant 1910 

Walker Building 1913 

The above dates refer to the years in which the various 
buildings were opened. 

Superintendents of the hospital from its opening have been 
as follows: 

George Chandler, M. D 1842-1845 

Andrew McFarland, M. D 1845-1852 

John E. Tyler, M. D 1852-1857 

Jesse P. Bancroft, M. D 1857-1882 

Charles P. Bancroft, M. D 1882- 

THE LIBRARY. 

The library was established in 182 3, when all the books) 
that had been accumulating for years in the state house were 
deposited in the department of state, and for forty-two years 
the secretary of state was librarian also. In 186 5 the legis- 
lature officially established the library as a separate institu- 
tion, and a board of library trustees was created the follow- 
ing year. It consists of three men, one appointed each year 
by the governor and council for a term of three years. The 
board appoints a librarian, who serves at the pleasure of the 
trustees and is the active head of the library. In 1891 the 
legislature created a library commission, consisting of the 
librarian and four others, and the commission was consoli- 
dated with the trustees in 1901. In 1913 a legislative ref- 
erence bureau was created by the legislature and is a part of 
the library. 

The following is a list of the librarians from the beginning, 
with the residence of each and the term served: 

Name of Librarian and Residence. Term Served. 

William H. Kimball, Concord 1866-72, 73-90 

Mitchel Gilmore, Concord 1872-73 

Arthur R. Kimball, Concord 1890-9 5 

Arthur H. Chase, Concord 189 5- 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 

The industrial school at Manchester was established by the 
legislature in 1855 and opened in 1858. Its original name 
was the house of reformation for juvenile and female offend- 
ers and was conducted along the lines of a penal institution. 
It was situated on part of the homestead of General John 
Stark of the Revolutionary army. In 1881 the name was 



212 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



changed to the industrial school and the policy of its manage- 
ment was changed from that of a penal to that of an educa- 
tional reformatory. During the last ten years the cottage 
system of housing the inmates has been carried out, and the 
present value of the property is over $250,000. 

The management of the institution was at first vested in a 
board of trustees appointed by the governor and council. In 
1913 the trustees were succeeded by the board of control, and 
this board was in turn succeeded in 1915 by the trustees of 
state institutions. 

The following is a list of the superintendents of the school 
from the beginning, with the term served by each: 

Name of Superintendent. Term Served. 

Brooks Shattuck 1858-67 

Isaac H. Jones 1867-74 

John E. Ray 1874-98 

Tom W. Robinson 1898-1912 

Charles E. Cox 1912 

William C. Morton 1912- 

PLYMOTTTH NORMAL SCHOOL. 

The Plymouth normal school was established by the legis- 
lature in 1870 and opened the following year. New buildings 
were built in 1887-1889, and in 1890-91 a schoolhouse and 
dormitory were erected. Over 1,6 00 students have been 
graduated from the school. The following is a list of the 
principals from the beginning, with the term served by each: 

Name of Principal. Term Served. 

Silas H. Pearl 1871-73 

Horatio O. Ladd 1873-76 

Ambrose P. Kelsey 1876-79 

Henry Pitt Warren 1879-83 

Charles C. Rounds 1883-96 

Alfred H. Campbell 1896-1900 

James E. Klock 1900-11 

Ernest L. Silver 1911- 

KEENE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

The Keene normal school was established by the legislature 
in 1909 and the governor and council and the trustees of 
the Plymouth normal school were made a joint board for its 
location and establishment. Additions to the school have 
been made continually since its establishment. The follow- 
ing is a list of its principals from the beginning, with the term 
served by each: 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 213 

Name of Principal. Term Served. 

Jeremiah M. Rhodes 1909-11 

Wallace L. Mason 1911- 

SCHOOL FOR FEEBLE-MINDED. 

The school for feeble-minded was created by the legislature 
in 19 01. Previous to that the feeble-minded children were 
supported by the state at the Massachusetts School for Feeble- 
Minded at Waverly, Mass. The New Hampshire school was 
established at Laconia, and its government vested in a board 
of trustees, consisting of the governor and five others ap- 
pointed by the governor and council. In 1913 the trustees 
were abolished and the institution placed under the board of 
control. In 1915 this board was abolished and the institu- 
tion placed under the trustees of state institutions and two 
members, Rev. John J. Brophy of Concord and William H. 
Moses of Tilton, were designated to look after this institu- 
tion especially. 

The school is situated on the slope of a ridge, two miles 
from the railroad and the city. It is bounded by the Belknap 
county farm on the south, Lake Opechee on the east and Lake 
Winnisquam on the west. The school was opened in 1903, 
and the following year its only brick dormitory was burned. 
The school was rapidly rebuilt and has expanded since then. 

While the school has grown steadily by new construction 
and the acquirement of land, the social, ethical and educa- 
tional side shows equal development. Suitable social amuse- 
ment and entertainment, with varied healthful occupations, 
such as approved by Seguin, Montessori and Dr. Fernald, are 
provided. The children are taught folk and other dancing, 
games, drills, music, basketry, knitting, weaving and the usual 
mental school work as far as each one is able to progress. 
Manual training, cobbling and the domestic sciences are also 
taken up. As all the vegetables, as well as the milk, for the 
entire school are raised on the grounds, the boys are given 
valuable instruction in gardening, farming and the care of the 
stock. 

The age of admission, by application and physician's cer- 
tificate, is from three to twenty-one years, but women up to 
the age of forty-five may be committed by probate court. 
The school now has a capacity of 280 children, and at this time 
the vacancies are all filled. 

The following is a list of superintendents of the school from 
its establishment, with the term served by each: 

Dr. Charles L. Little 1903-10 

Dr. Benjamin W. Baker 1910- 



214 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



THE COLLEGE. 

New Hampshire college was founded in 1866 and is known 
as New Hampshire College of Agriculture and the Mechanic 
Arts. It was situated at Hanover and connected with Dart- 
mouth college, both having the same president, for twenty- 
six years. The legislature of 1885 took steps to move the 
college, on the ground that it had graduated "less than forty 
agricultural students" in twenty years. In 1892 the college 
was removed to Durham. 

Government of the college is vested in a board of trustees, 
consisting of the governor, the president of the college, two 
members elected by the alumni and nine appointed by the 
governor and council, making thirteen in all. The nine ap- 
pointive members must include one from each councilor dis- 
trict and seven practical farmers, and not more than five shall 
be of one political party. The term of office is three years. 

The following is a list of the presidents of the college from 
the beginning, together with the term served by each: 

Name of President. Term Served. 

Asa D. Smith 1866-77 

Samuel C. Bartlett 1877-92 

Lyman D. Stevens 1892-93 

Charles S. Murkland 1893-1903 

William D. Gibbs 19 03-12 

Edward T. Fairchild 1912- 

SANATORIUM FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 

The sanatorium for consumptives, officially known as the 
New Hampshire state sanatorium, is at Glencliff, on the south- 
ern slope of Mount Moosilauke in the White Mountains. It 
was established by the legislature in 1907 and opened in 1909. 
Its establishment resulted from the recommendation of a 
commission which was authorized by the legislature in 19 01 
and which consisted of Dr. Ezra Mitchell of Lancaster, Dr. 
Nathaniel G. Brooks of Charlestown and Dr. Irving A. Wat- 
son of Concord, secretary of the board of health. 

The commission made its report and recommendation in 
1902, and five years later the legislature established the sana- 
torium. It is 1,650 feet above the sea and it enjoys an aver- 
age of 170 perfectly clear days every year. In 19 09 the two 
wards, one for men and one for women, were opened; in 1912 
they were enlarged and a service building was added; and in 
1913 and 1914 a barn, piggery, refrigerating plant, coal 
pocket and shack were added. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 215 

The sanatorium has a capacity of sixty-four patients no-w- 
and there are 411 acres of land. The value of the property 
is nearly $150,000, and its management is vested with the 
board of trustees of state institutions. The following is a 
list of the superintendents of the sanatorium from the begin- 
ning, with the name of the sanatorium from which each came 
to Glencliff and the term served: 

Name and Where From. Term Served. 

P. Challis Bartlett, Rutland, Mass 19 09-10 

John E. Runnells, Lakeville, Mass 1910-12 

John M. Wise, Rutland, Mass 1912- 



DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES. 

The department of motor vehicles was established by the 
legislature in 1915, and its head is a commissioner of motor 
vehicles. Previous to that year the registration of automo- 
biles was conducted by the secretary of state. The following 
is a list of the commissioners from the beginning, with the 
residence and term of service of each: 

Name of Commissioner and Residence. Term Served. 

Arthur L. Willis, Concord 1915-16 

Olin H. Chase, Newport 1916- 



UNITED STATES SENATORS FROM NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

The following is a list of the senators from this state, with 
the political party to which each belonged and the years of 
service. One of the first senators, John Langdon, was chosen 
president pro tempore of the first national senate in 1789 and 
presided over that body until Vice-President John Adams 
qualified as president of the senate by virtue of his office as 
vice-president. Senator Langdon was again elected president 
in the second senate in 1792-3. Senator Samuel Livermore 
was elected president of the fourth senate in 179 5-6 and of 
the sixth senate in 1799-18 00. Senator Daniel Clark was 
elected president of the thirty-eighth senate in 1863-4. Sena- 
tor Jacob H. Gallinger was elected president of the sixty- 
second senate in 1911-13. 

Name, Residence and Party. Term Served. 

Paine Wingate, Stratham, Republican. . . . 1789-93 

John Langdon, Portsmouth, Republican... 1789-1801 

Samuel Livermore, Holderness, Republican 179 3-1801 



216 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Name, Residence and Party. 
Simeon Olcott, Charlestown, Federalist 
James Sheaf e, Portsmouth, Federalist. 
William Plumer, Epping, Republican. . . 
Nicholas Gilman, Exeter, Federalist. . . . 
Nahum Parker, Fitzwilliam, Republican 
Charles Cutts, Portsmouth, Federalist. 
Jeremiah Mason, Portsmouth, Federalist. 
Thomas W. Thompson, Concord, Federalist 
David L. Morril, Goffstown, Federalist. . . 
Clement Storer, Portsmouth, Republican. 
John F. Parrott, Portsmouth, Republican. 

Samuel Bell, Chester, Republican 

Levi Woodbury, Portsmouth, Democrat. 

Isaac Hill, Concord, Democrat 

Henry Hubbard, Charlestown, Democrat 

John Page, Haverhill, Democrat 

Franklin Pierce, Hillsborough, Democrat. 
Leonard Wilcox, Orford, Democrat. . . 
Charles G. Atherton, Nashua, Democrat 
Benning W. Jenness, Strafford, Democrat 
Joseph Cilley, Nottingham, Democrat. 

John P. Hale, Dover, Free Soil 

Moses Norris, Jr., Manchester, Democrat. 
Jared W. Williams, Lancaster, Democrat. 

John S. Wells, Exeter, Democrat 

James Bell, Laconia, Whig 

Daniel Clark, Manchester, Republican. . . . 
Aaron H. Cragin, Lebanon, Republican. . . 
George G. Fogg, Concord, Republican... 
James W. Patterson, Hanover, Republican 
Bainbridge Wadleigh, Milford, Republican 
Edward H. Rollins, Concord, Republican 
Charles H. Bell, Exeter, Republican. . . . 
Henry W. Blair, Plymouth, Republican. . 
Austin F. Pike, Franklin, Republican. . 
Person C. Cheney, Manchester, Republican 
William E. Chandler, Concord, Republican 
Gilman Marston, Exeter, Republican. . . . 
Jacob H. Gallinger, Concord, Republican. 
Henry E. Burnham, Manchester, Republican 
Henry F. Hollis, Concord, Democrat 



Term Served. 
1801-05 
1801-02 
1802-07 
1805-14 
1807-10 
1810-13 
1813-17 
1814-17 
1817-23 
1817-19 
1819-25 
1823-35 
1825-31, 41-45 
1831-36 
1835-41 
1836-37 
1837-42 
1842-43 
1843-49, 1853 
1845-46 
1846-47 
1847-53, 55-65 
1849-55 
1853-55 
1855 
1855-57 
1857-66 
1865-77 
1866-67 
1867-73 
1873-79 
1877-83 
1879 

1879-1891 
1883-86 
1886-87 
1887-89, 89-01 
1889 
1891- 
1901-13 
1913- 



(NOTE— Dr. John Goddard of Portsmouth, a Federalist, was elected sena- 
tor in 1813, but declined.) 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 217 



CONGRESSMEN FROM NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Continental Congress, 1774-1788. 

Name of Member. Term Served. 

ohn Sullivan 1774-75, 80-81 

Nathaniel Folsom 1774-75, 77-78, 79-80 

osiah Bartlett 1775-79 

ohn Langdon 1775-77, 86-87 

Villiam Whipple 1776-79 

latthew Thornton 1776-78 

eorge Frost 1777-79 

ohn Wentworth, Jr 1778-79 

Nathaniel Peabody 1779-80 

Voodbury Langdon 1779-80 

amuel Livermore 1780-83, 85-86 

ohn T. Gilman 1782-83 

'hillips White 1782-83 

Lbiel Foster 1783-85 

onathan Blanchard 1783-85 

>ierce Long 1784-86 

Nicholas Gilman 1786-88 

>aine Wingate 1787-88 



House of Representatives, 1789-1917. 

Under the constitutional apportionment which provided for 
: house of representatives in congress, New Hampshire was 
Hotted three seats. The national census of 179 (first cen- 
us) increased this to four, the second census of 1800 to five 
md the third census of 1810 to six seats. The census of 1830 
•educed it to five, that of 1840 to four and that of 1850 to 
hree. The census of 1870 reduced it to two, but the seat 
aken away was restored until the next census of 188 0, since 
vrhen the state has for thirty-six years had two representatives. 

Name, Residence and Profession. Term Served. 

slicholas Gilman, Exeter, merchant 1789-97 

Samuel Livermore, Holderness, lawyer. . . . 1789-9 3 

Uriel Foster, Canterbury, clergyman 1789-91, 95-1803 

reremiah Smith, Peterborough, lawyer. . . . 1791-9 7 

rohn S. Sherburne, Portsmouth, lawyer. . . 179 3-9 7 

D aine Wingate, Stratham, clergyman. 1793-9 5 

iVilliam Gordon, Amherst, lawyer 1797-1800 

Peleg Sprague, Keene, lawyer 1797-99 

fonathan Freeman, Hanover, farmer 1797-1801 



218 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Name, Residence and Profession. Term Served. 

James Sheafe, Portsmouth, merchant 1799-1801 

Samuel Tenney, Exeter, physician 1800-07 

Joseph Pierce, Alton, farmer 1801-02 

Samuel Hunt, Charlestown, lawyer 1802-05 

George B. Upham, Claremont, lawyer 1801-03 

Silas Betton, Salem, lawyer 1803-07 

Clifton Claggett, Litchfield, lawyer 1803-05, 17-21 

David Hough, Lebanon, farmer 1803-07 

Thomas W. Thompson, Concord, lawyer. . . 1805-07 

Caleb Ellis, Claremont, lawyer 1805-07 

Daniel M. Durell, Dover, lawyer 1807-09 

Clement Storer, Portsmouth, merchant. . . . 1807-09 

Jedediah K. Smith, Amherst, lawyer 1807-09 

Francis Gardner, Walpole, lawyer 1807-09 

Peter Carleton, Landaff, farmer 1807-09 

Nathaniel A. Haven, Portsmouth, merchant 1809-11 

William Hale, Dover, merchant 1809-11, 13-17 

James Wilson, Peterborough, lawyer 1809-11 

John C. Chamberlain, Charlestown, lawyer 1809-11 

Daniel Blaisdell, Canaan, farmer 1809-11 

George Sullivan, Exeter, lawyer 1811-13 

Josiah Bartlett, Jr., Stratham, physician. . 1811-13 

John A. Harper, Meredith, lawyer 1811-13 

Samuel Dinsmoor, Keene, lawyer 1811-13 

Obed Hall, Bartlett, farmer 1811-13 

Daniel Webster, Portsmouth, lawyer 1813-17 

Bradbury Cilley, Nottingham, farmer 1813-17 

Samuel Smith, Peterborough, merchant. . . . 1813-15 

Roger Vose, Walpole, lawyer 1813-17 

Jeduthan Wilcox, Orford, lawyer 1813-17 

Charles H. Atherton, Amherst, lawyer. . . . 1815-17 

John F. Parrott, Portsmouth, merchant. . . . 1817-19 

Josiah Butler, Deerfield, lawyer 1817-23 

Nathaniel Upham, Rochester, merchant. . . 1817-23 

Salma Hale, Keene, lawyer 1817-19 

Arthur Livermore, Holderness, lawyer. . . . 1817-21, 23-25 

William Plumer, Jr., Epping, lawyer 1819-25 

Joseph Buffum, Jr., Keene, lawyer 1819-21 

Matthew Harvey, Hopkinton, lawyer 1821-25 

Aaron Matson, Stoddard, farmer 1821-25 

Thomas Whipple, Jr., Wentworth, physician 1821-29 

Ichabod Bartlett, Portsmouth, lawyer 1^23-29 

Nehemiah Eastman, Farmington, lawyer. . 1825-27 

Jonathan Harvey, Sutton, farmer 1825-31 

Titus Brown, Francestown, lawyer. ...... 1825-29 

Joseph Healey, Washington, farmer 1825-29 

David Barker, Jr., Rochester, lawyer 1827-29 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 219 



Name, Residence and Profession. Term Served. 

John Brodhead, Newmarket, clergyman. . . . 1829-33 

Joseph Hammons, Farmington, physician. . 1829-33 

rhomas Chandler, Bedford, farmer 1829-33 

Henry Hubbard, Charlestown, lawyer 1829-S5 

John W. Weeks, Lancaster, farmer 1829-33 

Joseph M. Harper, Canterbury, physician. . 1831-35 

Benning M. Bean, Moultonborough, farmer 1833-3 7 

Franklin Pierce, Hillsborough, lawyer. . . . 18 33-37 

Robert Burns, Plymouth, physician 1833-37 

Samuel Cushman, Portsmouth, lawyer. . . . 1835-39 

Joseph Weeks, Richmond, farmer 1835-39 

Fames Farrington, Rochester, physician. . . 1837-39 

Charles G. Atherton, Nashua, lawyer 1837-43 

Fared W. Williams, Lancaster, lawyer. . . . 1837-41 

rristram Shaw, Exeter, farmer 1839-43 

[ra A. Eastman, Gilmanton, lawyer 1839-43 

Edmund Burke, Newport, lawyer 1839-45 

John R. Reding, Haverhill, printer 1841-4 5 

Fohn P. Hale, Dover, lawyer 1843-45 

Moses Norris, Jr., Pittsfield, lawyer 1843-47 

VTace Moulton, Manchester, sheriff 1845-47 

Fames H. Johnson, Bath, merchant 1845-49 

\mos Tuck, Exeter, lawyer 1847-53 

Charles H. Peaslee, Concord, lawyer 1847-53 

Fames Wilson, Keene, lawyer 1847-51 

George W. Morrison, Manchester, lawyer. . . 1849-51, 53-55 

Harry Hibbard, Bath, lawyer 1849-55 

Fared Perkins, Winchester, clergyman. . . . 18 51-53 

George W. Kittridge, Newmarket, physician 18 53-55 

Fames Pike, Newmarket, physician 18 55-59 

Mason W. Tappan, Bradford, lawyer 18 55-61 

karon H. Cragin, Lebanon, lawyer 18 55-59 

Oilman Marston, Exeter, lawyer. 1859-63, 65-67 

rhomas M. Edwards, Keene, lawyer 18 59-63 

Edward H. Rollins, Concord, merchant. . . . 1861-67 

Daniel Marcy, Portsmouth, merchant 186 3-6 5 

Fames W. Patterson, Hanover, teacher. . . . 1863-67 

Facob H. Ela, Rochester, printer 1867-71 

karon F. Stevens, Nashua, lawyer 1867-71 

Facob Benton, Lancaster, lawyer 1867-71 

Ellery A. Hibbard, Laconia, lawyer 1871-73 

Samuel N. Bell, Manchester, lawyer 1871-7 3, 75-77 

Hosea W. Parker, Claremont, lawyer 1871-75 

William B. Small, Newmarket, lawyer.... 1873-75 

Austin F. Pike, Franklin, lawyer 1873-75 

Frank Jones, Portsmouth, brewer 1875-79 

Henry W. Blair, Plymouth, lawyer 1875-79 



220 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Name, Residence and Profession. Term Served. 

James F. Briggs, Manchester, lawyer 1877-83 

Joshua G. Hall, Dover, lawyer 1879-83 

Evarts W. Parr, Littleton, lawyer 1879-80 

Ossian Ray, Lancaster, lawyer 1881-8 5 

Martin A. Haynes, Gilford, publisher 1883-87 

Jacob H. Gallinger, Concord, physician. . . . 188 5-89 

Luther F. McKinney, Manchester, clergyman 1887-89, 91-93 

Alonzo Nute, Farmington, manufacturer. . 1889-91 

Orren C. Moore, Nashua, publisher 1889-91 

Warren F. Daniell, Franklin, manufacturer 1891-9 3 

Henry M. Baker, Bow, lawyer 1893-9 7 

Henry W. Blair, Plymouth, lawyer 189 3-9 5 

Cyrus A. Sulloway, Manchester, lawyer. . . . 1895-1913, 15- 

Frank G. Clarke, Peterborough, lawyer. . . . 1897-19 01 

Frank D. Currier, Canaan, lawyer 19 01-13 

Raymond B. Stevens, Landaff, farmer 1913-15 

Eugene E. Reed, Manchester, contractor. . 1913-15 

Edward H. Wason, Nashua, lawyer 1915- 

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS. 



Presidential elections have been held in New Hampshire 
from the beginning of the government elections in 1788 and 
every fourth year since. At the first election there was no 
choice of electors by the people, and the legislature selected 
the five candidates who received the most votes. In 1792 
two elections were polled before a majority vote was cast for 
six electors. In 1800 there was no popular vote, the legis- 
lature electing electors direct. The following is a list of all 
the presidential elections, the vote for the principal presi- 
dential candidates and the names of the electors: 



178! 



George Washington (no opposition). 

Electors. Defeated Candidates. 

Benjamin Bellows 1,759 John Dudley 718 

John Pickering 1,364 Joshua Wentworth 667 

Ebenezer Thompson 1,063 Nathaniel Folsom 589 

John Sullivan 872 Ebenezer Smith 543 

John Parker 851 Joseph Cilley 528 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 221 



1792. 
George Washington (no opposition). 

Electors. Defeated Candidates. 

Benjamin Bellows 1,489 Ebenezer Smith 678 

John Pickering 1,298 Joseph Cilley 376 

Ebenezer Thompson 994 Timothy Farrar 980 

Josiah Bartlett 1,782 Timothy Walker 235 

John T. Gilman 1,754 Daniel Rindge 437 

Jonathan Freeman 1,607 Thomas Cogswell 324 

1796. 

John Adams (no opposition in New Hampshire). 

Electors. Defeated Candidates. 

Benjamin Bellows 3,176 Bazaleel Woodward 2,077 

Ebenezer Thompson 2,867 Joseph Badger 681 

John T. Gilman 3,408 Robert Wallace 444 

Oliver Peabody 3,719 Thomas Bellows 443 

Timothy Farrar 3,027 Peter Wingate 310 

Timothy Walker 837 Simeon Olcott 481 

(Walker elected by legislature over Woodward) 
1800. 

John Adams supported by legislature without popular elec- 
tion, but defeated by Thomas Jefferson. 

Electors — Benjamin Bellows, Ebenezer Thompson, Oliver 
Peabody, Timothy Farrar, John Prentice, Arthur Livermore. 

1804. 

Thomas Jefferson, Republican candidate (elected). 

Republican Electors — Timothy Walker, John Goddard, Levi 
Bartlett, Jonathan Steele, Robert Alcock, George Aldrich, Wil- 
liam Tarlton. (No record of defeated candidates.) 

1808. 

Charles C. Pinckney, Federal (defeated) 14,006 

James Madison, Republican 12,744 

Electors — Oliver Peabody, Timothy Farrar, Robert Wal- 
lace, Jeremiah Smith, Benjamin West, Samuel Hale, Jonathan 
Franklin. 



222 NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



1812. 

DeWitt Clinton, Federal (defeated) 19,386 

James Madison, Republican 15,917 

Electors — Oliver Peabody, Timothy Farrar, Benjamin 
West, Samuel Hale, Jonathan Franklin, Nathan Taylor, Caleb 
Ellis, John Goddard. 

1816. 

James Monroe, Republican (elected) 15,188 

Rufus King, Federal 13,367 

Electors — Daniel Young, Thomas C. Drew, Jacob Tuttle, 
Richard H. Ayer, Amos Cogswell, William Badger, Benjamin 
Butler, Thomas Manning. 

1820. 

James Monroe, Republican (unanimously re-elected). 

Electors — William Plumer, William Fisk, Samuel Dins- 
moor, Nathaniel Shannon, Ezra Bartlett, David Barker, John 
Pendexter, James Smith. 

1824. 

John Q. Adams, Republican (uncontested in New Hamp- 
shire). 

Electors — William Fisk, Josiah Bartlett, Samuel Quarles, 
William Badger, Abel Parker, Caleb Keith, Moses White, Hall 
Burgin. 

1828. 

John Q. Adams, Republican (defeated) 24,118 

Andrew Jackson, Democrat 20,922 

Electors — Samuel Quarles, George Sullivan, Samuel Spar- 
hawk, William Bixby, Nahum Parker, Thomas Woolson, Ezra 
Bartlett, William Lovejoy. 

1832. 

Andrew Jackson, Democrat (elected) 26,269 

Henry Clay, Whig 19,627 

Electors — Moses White, Benjamin Pierce, Phineas Park- 
hurst, Samuel Collins, John Taylor, John Holbrook, Joseph 
Weeks. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 223 



1836. 

Martin Van Buren, Democrat (elected) 18,722 

William H. Harrison, Whig 6,228 

Electors — Jonathan Harvey, Isaac Waldron, Tristram 
Shaw, Stephen Gale, Josiah Russell, Gawen Gilmore, Ebenezer 
Carlton. 

1840. 

Martin Van Buren, Democrat (defeated) 32,670 

William H. Harrison, Whig 26,434 

Electors — John W. Weeks, Stephen Perley, Samuel Hatch, 
Andrew Pierce, Jr,. John Scott, Francis Holbrook, Samuel 
Burns. 

1844. 

James K. Polk, Democrat (elected) 27,016 

Henry Clay, Whig 17.766 

James G. Birney, Free Soil 4,152 

Electors — William Badger, John McNeil, Elijah R. Currier, 
Isaac Hale, Elijah Sawyer, John L. Putnam. 

1848. 

Lewis Cass, Democrat (defeated) 27,762 

Zachary Taylor, Whig (elected) 14,789 

Martin Van Buren, Free Soil 7,559 

Electors — Samuel Tilton, Jesse Bowers, Joseph H. Smith, 
Jonathan Eastman, Richard H. Ayer, Simeon Warner. 

1852. 

Franklin Pierce, Democrat (elected) 2 8,884 

Winfield Scott, Whig 15,540 

John P. Hale, Free Soil 6,568 

Electors — Henry Hubbard, Samuel Jones, Jabez A. Doug- 
lass, Samuel Webster, Nathaniel B. Baker. 

1856. 

John C. Fremont, Republican (defeated) 37,591 

James Buchanan, Democrat (elected) 31,889 

Electors — William H. H. Bailey, Thomas L. Whitton, Dan- 
iel Clark, Thomas M. Edwards, John H. White. 



224 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



1860. 

Abraham Lincoln, Republican (elected) 37,269 

Stephen N. Douglass, Democrat . 25,659 

John C. Breckenridge, Democrat 2,094 

John Bell, Union 407 

Electors — John Sullivan, Ebenezer Stevens, David Gillis, 
Nathaniel Tolles, Daniel Blaisdell. 

1864. 

Abraham Lincoln, Republican (elected) 36,600 

George B. McClellan, Democrat 33,034 

Electors — William H. Y. Hackett, Daniel M. Christie, Archi- 
bald H. Dunlap, Allen Giffen, Henry O. Kent. 

1868. 

Ulysses S. Grant, Republican (elected) 37,718 

Horatio Seymour, Democrat 30,574 

Electors — John S. Bennett, John W. Sanborn, Franklin 
Tenney, Edmund L. Cushing, John Bedel. 

1872. 

Ulysses S. Grant, Republican (elected) 37,167 

Horace Greeley, Democrat 31,433 

Electors — Lyman D. Stevens, Benjamin J. Cole, Phinehas 
Adams, William Haile, Benjamin F. Whidden. 

1876. 

Rutherford B. Hayes, Republican (elected) 41,539 

Samuel J. Tilden, Democrat 38,509 

Electors — Zimri S. Wallingford, John J. Morrill, Moody 
Currier, Levi W. Barton, John M. Brackett. 

1880. 

James A. Garfield, Republican (elected) 44,852 

Winfield S. Hancock, Democrat 40,794 

Electors — Aretas Blood, Ezra H. Winchester, Albert S. 
Eastman, John A. Spaulding, Henry L. Tilton. 




\jl) SENATOR 

Ahenryfhoujs^ 



SENATOR 

JACOB H.QALUIWER.R 



. -QONQReSSIOMAL- PELEQATIOM * 

, ••• .., >- ■- • ... . ■- i - 




REPRESENTATIVE 

EPWARPH.WASQN R. 




\ylf REPRESENTATIVE 

VJ^YR\/Sft.SVLLOWftY / R. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 225 



1884. 

James G. Blaine, Republican (defeated) 43,249 

Grover Cleveland, Democrat 39,192 

Electors — George W. Libbey, James E. Larkin, John B. 
Smith, Marshall C. Wentworth. 

1888. 

Benjamin Harrison, Republican (elected) 45,728 

Grover Cleveland, Democrat 43,456 

Electors — George W. Nesmith, Charles D. McDuffee, 
Charles S. Whitehouse, Frank A. Cofran. 

1892. 

Benjamin Harrison, Republican (defeated) 45,658 

Grover Cleveland, Democrat 42,081 

Electors — Augustus A. Woolson, George W. Abbott, Joseph 
A. Walker, Abraham P. Olzendam. 

1896. 

William McKinley, Republican (elected) 57,444 

William J. Bryan, Democrat 21,271 

John M. Palmer, Gold Democrat 3,420 

Electors — Frank P. Maynard, Stephen N. Bourne, Hiram 
A. Tuttle, Thomas H. VanDyke. 

1900. 

William McKinley, Republican (elected) 54,798 

William J. Bryan, Democrat 35,489 

Electors — William J. Hoyt, Seth M. Richards, Joseph O. 
Hobbs, William H. Mitchell. 

1904. 

Theodore Roosevelt, Republican (elected) 54,165 

Alton B. Parker, Democrat 34,074 

Electors — Herman F. Straw, Frank W. Rollins, Charles S. 
Collins, Albert Bachelder. 



226 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



1908. 

William H. Taft, Republican (elected) 53,149 

William J. Bryan, Democrat 33,655 

Electors— Charles H. Greenleaf, Sumner Wallace, Frank E. 
Anderson, Warren Brown. 

1912. 

Woodrow Wilson, Democrat (elected) 34,724 

William H. Taft, Republican 32,927 

Theodore Roosevelt, Progressive 17,804 

Electors — John C. Pattee, Roger G. Sullivan, Charles E. 
Tilton, Fred H. Brown. 

1916. 

Woodrow Wilson, Democrat (elected) 43,787 

Charles E. Hughes, Republican 43,724 

Electors — Charles G. Barnard, Lawrence M. Connor, Jules 
Parent, Samuel D. Felker. 



THE PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY, MARCH 14, 1916. 

A presidential primary was held March 14, 1916, for the 
first time in New Hampshire, in accordance with the law 
passed in 1913 and amended in 1915. In 1912 a presidential 
primary was conducted under the auspices of the Republican 
partv organization, and only the Republican party participated 
in the voting. The official returns of the 1916 presidential 
primary were as follows: 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 
REPUBLICAN PARTY. 



227 



Delegates-at-Large. 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. 






Albany 4 

Allenstown t 15 

Alton 9 

Atkinson 11 



Auburn 

Barnstead 

Barrington 

Bartlett 

Bedford 

Belmont 

Brentwood 

Brookfield 

Candia 

Canterbury 

Center Harbor . 

Chatham 

Chester 

Chichester 

Conway 

Danville 

Deerfield 

Derry 

Dover — Ward 1 
Dover — Ward 2 
Dover — Ward 3 
Dover — Ward 4 
Dover — Ward 5 

Durham 

East Kingston 

Eaton 

Effingham 

Epping 

Epsom 

Exeter 

Farmington . . . 

Freedom 

Fremont 

Gilford 

Gilmanton 

Goff stown 

Greenland 

Hampstead .... 

Hampton 

Hampton Falls 



10 
IH 
26 
24 
33 
23 
32 

1 
38 
16 
17 

6 

68 
20 
L0 

5 
29 
32 
71 
30 
44 
71 
47 
30 
56 

"\ 
28 

8 

16 
9 
2S 
20 
88 

176 
27 
19 
12 
10 

112 
26 
33 
27 
18 



4 
25 

6 
14 

9 
25 
24 
88 
174 
27 
18 
20 
24 
97 
25 
32 



13 

23 
19 
24 
34 
32 
29 

2 
44 
22 
16 

7 
71 
19 
13 

5 

30 
34 
73 
30 
48 

74 

49 

27 
42 

"4 
24 
8 
16 
7 
27 
23 
89 

148 
27 
17 
20 
23 

117 
25 
34 
26 
19 



18 
24 
104 
24 
31 
24 
22 



District 

Delegates. 



14 
IS 
2:, 
2r, 
35 
30 
?><> 

2 
38 
24 
it; 

7 

59 

IS 

13 

5 

28 ! 
25 

53 I 
31 
43 
64 I 

48 ; 

27 
49 



14 



25 I 
15 j 



85 j 90 

47 175 

22 |j 25 

15 |i 16 



22 


22 


34 


34 


120 


122 


26 


26 


33 


34 


28 


28 


21 


21 



14 



16 



30 
61 

74 
42 
25 
48 

"4 
27 
8 
16 
15 
32 
22 
89 

174 
25 
17 



228 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT.— Continued. 



Hart's Location 

Hooksett 

Hudson 

Jackson 

Kensington 

Kingston 

Laconia — Ward 1 . . 
Laconia — Ward 2 .. 
Laconia — Ward 3 . . 
Laconia — Ward 4 . . 
Laconia — Ward 5 . . 
Laconia — Ward 6 . . 

Lee 

Litchfield 

Londonderry ., 

Loudon 

Madbury 

Madison 

Manchester — Ward 1 
Manchester — Ward 2 
Manchester — Ward 3 
Manchester — Ward 4 
Manchester — Ward 5 
Manchester — Ward 6 
Manchester — Ward 7 
Manchester — Ward 8 
Manchester — Ward 9 
Manchester — Ward 1 
Manchester — Ward 1 
Manchester — Ward 1! 
Manchester — Ward 1! 

Meredith 

Merrimack 

Middleton 

Milton 

Moultonborough 

New Durham 

New Hampton 

Newcastle 

Newfields 

Newington 

Newmarket 

Newton 

North Hampton 

Northfield 



Delegates-at-Large. 



District 
Delegates. 






-2 s 
ft 



2 

17 

13 

2 

2 

1 

28 

22 

10 

3fi 

60 

84 

6 

3 

12 

10 

6 

11 

83 

74 

107 

63 

20 

65 

34 

32 

64 

23 

22 

28 

34 

26 

43 

6 



2 

24 

52 

8 

12 

15 

21 

20 

22 

63 

59 

103 

17 

27 

42 

28 

25 

21 

191 

181 

132 

127 

20 

81 

26 

51 

139 

62 

54 

36 

67 

30 



2 

21 

51 

8 

12 

15 

33 

33 

29 

87 

117 

172 

15 

26 

53 

29 

21 

18 

147 

171 

138 

124 

23 

74 

21 

37 

118 

57 

48 

42 

59 

52 

27 

7 

20 



2 

29 

54 

8 

11 

15 

34 

37 

32 

92 

119 

178 

10 

27 

47 

28 

19 

21 

212 

206 

176 

155 

28 

105 

28 

54 

163 

69 

61 

53 

69 

55 

64 

1 

17 
65 

a 

e> 

n 

9 
76 
11 
13 
36 



18 

52 

6 

12 

14 

37 

35 

31 

91 

106 

174 

14 

25 

47 

21 

17 

12 

184 

167 

164 

143 

25 

102 

28 

49 

141 

66 

57 

39 

58 

51 

61 

7 

22 



61 

7 

14 

17 

34 

31 

29 

79 

110 

165 

14 

26 

51 

23 

22 

21 

195 

197 

175 

151 

25 

105 

32 

55 

171 

63 

57 

54 

68 

56 

61 

7 

26 

67 

'21 

6 

15 

9 

124 

13 

10 

57 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



229 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT.— Concluded. 



Northwood 

Nottingham 

Ossipee 

Pelham 

Pembroke 

Pittsfield 

Plaistow 

Portsmouth — Ward 1 
Portsmouth — Ward 2 
Portsmouth — Ward 3 
Portsmouth — Ward 4 
Portsmouth — Ward 5 

Raymond 

Rochester — Ward 1 . . 
Rochester — Ward 2 . . 
Rochester — Ward 3 . . 
Rochester — Ward 4 . . 
Rochester — Ward 5 . . 
Rochester — Ward 6 . . 

Rollinsford 

Rye 

Salem 

Sanbornton 

Sandown 

Sandwich 

Seabrook 

Somersworth — Ward 1 
Somersworth — Ward 2 
Somersworth — Ward 3 
Somersworth — Ward 4 
Somersworth — Ward 5 

South Hampton 

Strafford 

Stratham 

Tamworth 

Tilton 

Tuftonboro 

Wakefield 

Windham 

Wolfeboro 



Delegates-at-Large. 



o 

M > 



13 

7 

32 

24 

L3 

11 

11 

4 

6 

4 

L2 

3 

4 

10 

9 

6 

6 

6 

11 

L07 

19 

8 

22 





sa 




<D 




W 




o 


a 


3 


OS 




w 


w 


bfl 


o 

bfl 


► 


o 


p 


o 


25 


24 


23 


22 


28 


32 


12 


11 


60 


58 


54 


55 


30 


22 


32 


22 


17 


62 


10 


9 


22 


19 


10 


9 


20 


13 


14 


14 


7 


7 


24 


24 


44 


41 


14 


15 


17 


15 


24 


22 


18 


13 


116 


95 


41 


53 


11 


9 


41 


40 


8 


4 


12 


11 


18 


17 


17 


13 


5 


4 


2 


2 


23 


21 


2 


2 


26 


27 


25 


29 


33 


30 


15 


15 


26 


14 


52 


49 



25 
24 
32 

in 
(i'J 

104 
31 
33 
81 
10 
23 
11 
22 
15 

6 
21 
38 
13 
15 
22 
19 
145 
58 
15 
41 

7 
10 
17 
12 

3 

2 

'23 
3 

25 
31 
31 
14 
26 
51 



21 

14 

8 

17 

40 

12 

is 

22 

20 

152 

56 

11 

29 

5 

13 

14 

12 

4 

3 

*22 

'27 
32 
28 
13 
29 
43 



District 
Delegates. 



24 
23 

60 
12 
76 
57 
38 
35 
78 
12 
27 
12 
21 
13 

7 
23 
38 
14 
19 
23 
22 
155 
54 
14 
48 

7 
13 
20 
17 

5 

1 

25 

4 
32 
31 
39 
17 
26 
56 



14 

19 

24 

23 

163 

55 

14 

45 

6 

13 

20 

17 

5 



230 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. 



Delegates-at-Large. 



District 

Delegates. 



03 

M 2 

c ° 



Acworth 

Alexandria 

Alstead 

Amherst 

Antrim 

Ashland 

Bath 

Bennington 

Benton 

Berlin — Ward 1 . 
Berlin — Ward 2 . 
Berlin — Ward 3 . 
Berlin — Ward 4 . 

Bethlehem 

Boscawen 

Bow 

Bradford 

Bristol 

Brookline 

Campton 

Canaan 

Carroll 

Charlestown 

Chesterfield 

Claremont 

Clark sville 

Colebrook 

Columbia 

Concord — Ward 1 
Concord — Ward 2 
Concord — Ward 3 
Concord — Ward 4 
Concord — Ward 5 
Concord — Ward 6 
Concord — Ward 7 
Concord — Ward 8 
Concord — Ward 9 

Cornish 

Croydon 

Dalton 

Danbury 

Deering 

Dorchester 

Dublin 

Dummer 



11 
18 
66 
26 
10 
17 

'is 

45 
38 

7 

24 
37 
13 
27 
64 
17 
21 
61 
25 
42 
20 
189 

2 

25 
25 
33 
15 
27 



11 
11 
11 
17 
62 
25 
13 
18 

3 
16 
39 
35 

7 
29 
36 
12 
27 
106 
17 
29 
72 
23 
42 
23 
180 

2 
31 
27 
38 
16 
25 
79 
83 
87 
74 
10 

9 
25 

5 

20 
34 

2 
13 
19 



36 
12 
26 
95 
17 
29 
73 
23 
47 
21 
190 
1 

27 
23 
40 
15 
27 



10 

8 
19 
64 

34 t 
13 i 
16 

3 
17 
46 
37 

8 
29 
32 
14 
16 
96 
16 
28 
70 
23 
30 
17 
149 

1 

27 
23 
36 
15 
25 
80 
85 



10 



14 

28 
92 
18 
33 
63 
27 
46 
32 
175 
2 
31 
27 
40 
19 
29 



18 
35 
61 
25 
42 
29 
139 
2 
29 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



231 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. — Continued. 



Delegates-at-Large. 



District 

Delegates. 



Dunbarton 

Enfield 

Errol 

Fitzwilliam 

Francestown 

Franconia 

Franklin — Ward 1 
Franklin — Ward 2 
Franklin — Ward 3 

Gilsum 

G-orham 

Goshen 

Grafton 

Grantham 

Greenfield 

Greenville 

Groton 

Hancock 

Hanover 

Harrisville 

Haverhill 

Hebron 

Henniker 

Hill 

Hillsborough 

Hinsdale 

Holderness 

Hollis 

Hopkinton 

Jaffrey 

Jefferson 

Keene — Ward 1 . . 
Keene — Ward 2 . . 
Keene — Ward 3 . . 
Keene — Ward 4 . . 
Keene — Ward 5 . . 

Lancaster 

Landaff 

Langdon 

Lebanon 

Lempster 

Lincoln 

Lisbon 

Littleton 

Livermore 



c ° 







u 






9 




<D 


X 




O 


03 


~ 


s 


Pn 


oj 






w 


H 


B 


s 




9 














A 






23 


20 


23 


29 


56 


57 


33 


28 


34 


18 


22 


22 


1 


3 


2 


17 


8 


17 


8 


9 


9 


35 


32 


35 


12 


12 


12 


7 


8 


7 


14 


16 


17 


12 


19 


18 


4 


4 


4 


12 


17 


17 


8 


7 


9 


9 


15 


14 


15 


21 


20 


26 


37 


40 


15 


17 


17 


56 


55 


57 


2 


6 


6 


46 


44 


48 


17 


17 


15 


45 


69 


67 


25 


25 


24 


14 


27 


26 


28 


33 


37 


78 


76 


80 


34 


34 


35 


24 


23 


21 


34 


30 


33 


19 


16 


19 


26 


24 


25 


29 


27 


26 


13 


13 


13 


82 


78 


82 


5 


4 


5 


6 


5 


5 


51 


59 


50 


21 


20 


19 


13 


13 


12 


108 


94 


118 


16 


16 


18 




3 


3 



11 

7 
13 
16 

2 
17 

9 
14 
20 
40 
16 
54 

5 

40 
18 
65 
21 
23 
40 
78 
34 
21 
31 
19 
24 
27 
11 
79 

5 

2 
46 
20 
11 
112 
17 

3 



2 
17 
10 
37 
12 

8 
19 
18 

4 
15 
10 
It 
24 
43 
17 
55 

5 
49 
20 
67 
31 
31 
41 
91 
42 
30 
36 
22 
27 
32 
12 
85 

5 

3 

51 
22 
13 
130 
17 

3 



40 
34 
35 
19 
26 
31 
13 
88 
4 
3 

50 
20 
13 
138 
18 
3 



232 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. — Continued. 



Delegates-at-Large. 



District 
Delegates. 



Lyman 

Lyme 

Lyndeborough 
Marlborough . 

Marlow , 

Mason 

Milan 

Milford 

Monroe 

Mont Vernon 
Nashua — Ward 
Nashua — Ward 
Nashua — Ward 
Nashua — Ward 
Nashua — Ward 
Nashua — Ward 
Nashua — Ward 
Nashua — Ward 8 
Nashua — Ward 9 

Nelson 

New Boston 

Newbury 

New Ipswich . . . 

New London 

Newport 

Northumberland 

Orange 

Orford 

Peterborough . . . 

Piermont 

Pittsburg 

Plainfield 

Plymouth 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Rindge , 

Roxbury 

Rumney 

Salisbury 

Sharon 

Shelburne 

Springfield 

Stark 

Stewartstown . . 



M 2 

S3 



13 
22 
19 
16 
36 
98 
14 

4 

24 
41 
22 
11 
37 
71 

9 

6 
43 

4 
14 

5 

1 
16 

9 
21 
29 



5 
38 
28 
19 
11 

2 

34 
109 
36 
13 
66 
53 

5 
14 

2 
11 
38 
29 

8 
14 
24 
18 
15 
38 
99 
14 

4 
26 
43 
23 
11 
39 
74 

9 

5 
44 

4 
19 

6 

1 
13 
17 
22 



4 
34 
27 
18 
11 

2 

30 
106 
29 
13 
66 
55 

6 
20 

2 
15 
38 
31 
10 
13 
23 
13 
18 
31 
91 
10 

4 
25 
38 
24 

7 
37 
71 

3 

4 
37 

4 
14 

4 

1 

"is 

20 
23 



31 

22 
11 

2 
33 
109 
33 
10 
67 
51 

5 
15 

3 
10 
32 
27 
10 
10 
31 
20 
19 
42 
109 
16 

4 
23 
48 
23 
12 
42 
72 



3TW HAMPSHIRE ilAJlAL. 233 



District 

Delegates-at-Large. _ : .^i;:: 



SECO:ST) 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. — Concluded. 



Stoddard 4 

Stratford 3 

Sullivan 

Sunapee 2 

Surry 

Sutton 2 

Swanzey 5 

Temple 

Thornton 4 

Troy 4 

Unity 12 

Walpole 13 

Warner 10 

Warren 7 

Washington 3 

Waterville 5 

Weare 12 

Webster 5 

Wentworth 1 

Westmoreland 4 

Whitefield S 

Wilmot 10 

Wilton 

Winchester 

Windsor 

Woodstock 



- 




n 


g 


- j 


11 


11 


:. 


:: 


1 


11 


11 


11 


11 


n 


11 


1 


13 


7 


9 


9 


9 


12 


12 


8 


7 


9 


7 


9 


8 


13 


:: 


14 


i: 


1 


15 


-? 


29 


:s 


26 


35 


33 


3 




3 


3 


3 


3 


1 


10 


11 




■ 


10 


14 


11 


14 


13 


15 


15 


4 


16 


16 


16 


1" 


17 


:-•. 


;-: 


M 


- 


112 


96 


-. 




91 


83 


M 


S3 


li 


9 


12 


10 


10 


: 


5 


:: 


: 


7 


9 


8 


7 


3 


7 


6 


7 


7 


15 


11 


17 


1~ 


17 


17 


14 


13 


: 


11 


14 


1: 


3 


■-> 


3 


3 


3 


3 


:- 


18 


19 


17 


! 


18 


_' 


26 


S 


25 


-• 


27 


li 


11 


10 


j 


4 


4 


37 


4-? 


39 


41 




fl 


23 


23 


25 




_■ 


25 



21 


37 


4-? 


39 


3 


23 


23 


25 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


S 


- 


• 



234 



NEW IIAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. 



Albany 

Allenstown 

Alton 

Atkinson , 

Auburn 

Barnstead 

Barrington 

Bartlett 

Bedford 

Belmont 

Brentwood 

Brookfield 

Candia 

Canterbury .... 
Center Harbor 

Chatham , 

Chester 

Chichester 

Conway 

Danville 

Deerfield 

Derry 

Dover — Ward 1 
Dover — Ward 2 
Dover — Ward 3 
Dover — Ward 4 
Dover — Ward 5 

Durham 

East Kingston . 

Eaton 

Effingham 

Epping 

Epsom 

Exeter 

Farmington 

Freedom 

Fremont 

Gilford 

Gilmanton 

Goffstown 

Greenland 

Hampstead 

Hampton 

Hampton Falls 



Alternate. 
Delegates-at-Large. 



Alternate. 
District 

Delegates. 



13 

25 
27 
24 
30 
31 
25 

3 
37 
28 
18 

8 
54 
22 
14 

2 
29 
30 
61 
26 
48 
63 
39 
24 
44 

"3 
31 
8 
18 
15 
31 
18 
92 

152 
27 
17 
15 
33 

102 
25 
34 
26 
22 



^ 




u 




eS 




a 




h 


£ 


3 


13 




ea 


* 


GO 


M 


tS 




eS 


U 






& 


<3 


11 


12 


23 


25 


27 


27 


23 


24 


30 


29 


30 


30 


17 


27 


3 


3 


40 


36 


27 


29 


17 


18 


8 


8 


53 


54 


21 




12 


14 


2 


2 


28 


30 


31 


33 


68 


68 


27 


26 


49 


48 


64 


64 


38 


38 


24 


22 


44 


45 


"3 


3 


29 


30 


8 


8 


17 


17 


16 


16 


34 


31 


18 


17 


92 


92 


152 


151 


27 


27 


15 


17 


18 


18 


29 


32 


103 


100 


25 


26 


34 


34 


26 


26 


21 


20 



14 
2 
30 
31 
62 
27 
49 
62 
39 
24 
45 

"3 
30 
8 
18 
16 
32 
17 
93 

157 
26 
19 
18 
33 

100 
26 
33 
26 
21 



11 
25 
24 
24 
34 
29 
27 

3 
37 
27 
15 

8 
55 
22 
14 

1 
29 
26 
59 
29 
52 
63 
39 
25 
44 

"3 
29 
8 
16 
17 
33 
17 
93 

179 
24 
17 
14 
28 

100 
26 
34 
26 
19 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



235 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. — Continued. 



Alternate. 
Delegates-at-Large. 



Hart's Location 

Hooksett 

Hudson 

Jackson 

Kensington 

Laconia — Ward 1 

Laconia — Ward 2 

Laconia — Ward 3 

Laconia — Ward 4 

Laconia — Ward 5 

Laconia — Ward 6 

Lee 

Litchfield 

Londonderry 

Loudon 

Madbury 

Madison 

Manchester — Ward 1 
Manchester — Ward 2 
Manchester — Ward 3 
Manchester — Ward 4 
Manchester — Ward 5 
Manchester — Ward 6 
Manchester — Ward 7 
Manchester — Ward 8 
Manchester — Ward 9 
Manchester — Ward 10 
Manchester — Ward 11 
Manchester — Ward 12 
Manchester — Ward 13 

Meredith 

Merrimack 

Middleton 

Milton 

Moultonborough 

New Durham 

New Hampton 

Newcastle 

Newfields 

Newington 

Newmarket 

Newton 

North Hampton 



146 


139 


15 


15 


23 


24 


46 


46 


28 


28 


22 


21 


20 


20 


185 


185 


181 


193 


157 


159 


134 


136 


24 


24 


99 


96 


27 


32 


46 


44 


171 


171 


53 


53 


50 


49 


35 


38 


53 


55 


52 


48 


56 


59 


7 


7 


24 


24 


66 


66 


15 


'is 


7 


7 


14 


13 


7 


7 


124 


124 


12 


12 


8 


9 



2 

21 

61 

7 

14 

33 

28 

26 

74 

96 

151 

14 

23 

46 

26 

21 

20 

186 

187 

153 

134 

22 

95 

28 

47 

171 

51 

49 

34 

53 

51 

55 

7 

25 

66 

*15 

7 
14 

7 

124 

12 



Alternate. 
District 

Delegates. 



2 I 
23 

59 

ill 

33 ! 

28 ! 

26 J 

73 

93 I 
150 ! 

15 I 

23 ! 

46 

28 

21 

20 
184 
181 
157 
134 

23 

95 

27 

44 
171 

53 

49 

33 

56 

50 

56 
7 

24 

66 

15 

7 
13 

7 

124 

12 



60 
9 

14 

30 

25 

22 

65 

86 

132 

15 

24 

45 

25 

21 

20 

184 

182 

157 

137 

24 

99 

27 

46 

171 

54 

51 

55 

52 

44 

53 

7 

24 

65 

"l5 
5 

14 

8 

124 

10 

9 



84 

129 

16 

23 

43 

23 

21 

20 

182 

178 

154 

136 

23 

98 

26 

46 

171 

52 

50 

55 

50 

42 

53 

7 

24 

65 

'l5 

5 

14 

8 

124 

12 



236 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DI STRICT.— Concluded. 



Northfield 

Northwood 

Nottingham 

Ossipee 

Pelhara 

Pembroke 

Pittsfield 

Plaistow 

Portsmouth — Ward 1 
Portsmouth — Ward 2 
Portsmouth — Ward 3 
Portsmouth — Ward 4 
Portsmouth — Ward 5 

Raymond 

Rochester — Ward 1 . . 
Rochester — Ward 2 .. 
Rochester — Ward 3 .. 
Rochester — Ward 4 .. 
Rochester — Ward 5 . . 
Rochester — Ward 6 . . 

Rollinsford 

Rye 

Salem 

Sanbornton 

Sandown 

Sandwich 

Seabrook 

Somersworth — Ward 1 
Somersworth — Ward 2 
Somersworth — Ward 3 
Somersworth — Ward 4 
Somersworth — Ward 5 

South Hampton 

Strafford 

Stratham 

Tamworth 

Tilton 

Tuftonboro 

Wakefield 

Windham 

Wolfeboro 



Alternate. 
Delegates-at-Large. 



Alternate. 
District 
Delegates. 



56 
23 
21 
49 

5 
66 
44 
33 
33 
72 
10 
26 
10 
20 
15 

6 
20 
39 
12 
15 
24 
20 
113 
53 
13 
33 

7 
12 
20 
13 

4 



•a 




M 




cj 




£ 


K 


a 


"5 




03 


fc 


OQ 


m 


tJ 


03 


h 






h 


< 


52 


52 


23 


23 


22 


21 


48 


49 


7 


5 


67 


64 


44 


43 


33 


33 


32 


33 


72 


74 


10 


10 


24 


25 


10 


12 


20 


20 


15 


15 


6 


e 


21 


21 


38 


39 


12 


12 


16 


15 


24 


24 


21 


20 


112 


111 


52 


54 


12 


13 


31 


32 


7 


6 


12 


12 


20 


20 


13 


12 


4 


4 


2 


2 


'24 


'24 


3 


3 


32 


32 


28 


28 


36 


36 


15 


15 


24 


26 


55 


56 



52 



35 
31 
75 
10 
25 
12 
20 
15 
6 

21 
39 
12 
16 
24 
22 
113 
52 
13 



50 
22 
23 
50 

8 
65 
38 
34 
39 
75 
10 
25 
12 
21 
13 

7 
22 
38 
13 
16 
22 
21 
117 
48 
12 
31 

8 
11 
18 
13 

4 



32 
74 
10 
25 
11 
21 
14 

7 
21 
38 
13 
16 
22 
18 
110 
48 
13 
28 

6 
11 
20 
12 

4 

3 

'25 
4 
31 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



237 











Alternate. 






Alternate. 




District 




Delegates-at-Large. 


Delegates. 






13 




o 




>> 




a 


t* 














cS 










SECOND 


o 


fl 




<0 


© 





CONGRESSIONAL 


u 


oS 


>» 


CQ 


Cj 


w 


DISTRICT. 




3 


03 










ft 




D 


a 


w 






$ 


W 


'O 








CQ 








GJ 


a 






m 








03 













c 






*H 


o3 




to 


A 


^3 




ffl 


£ 


< 


« 


o 
ha 


* 




12 

9 


i 
13 12 


12 
9 


13 
8 


12 


Alexandria 


10 


11 


8 




12 
15 
60 
36 
17 
19 


12 
15 

57 
34 
17 
21 


12 
15 
56 

38 
17 
18 


12 
14 
56 
34 
16 
19 


11 
16 
54 
36 

18 
18 


11 




16 




56 




34 


Bath 


17 




19 




3 
11 
32 


3 

11 
31 


3 

11 
33 


3 
11 
33 


'ii 

31 




Berlin — Ward 1 


11 


Berlin — Ward 2 


32 


Berlin — Ward 3 


30 


30 


29 


30 


31 


32 


Berlin — Ward 4 


10 


10 


9 


10 


10 


9 


Bethlehem 


25 


25 


27 


26 


30 


27 


Boscawen 


36 


37 


37 


37 


35 


37 


Bow 


13 


14 


14 


13 


13 


13 


Bradford 


27 


29 


27 


28 


29 


29 




76 
18 
28 


75 
18 
28 


79 
18 
34 


75 
18 
26 


70 
17 
29 


68 




17 


Campton 


31 




59 
6 


58 
6 


60 
6 


61 
6 


58 
8 


61 


Carroll 


10 


Charlestown 


37 


34 


36 


34 






Chesterfield 


17 


19 


18 


21 


20 


20 


Claremont 


113 


118 


108 


113 


106 


163 


Clarksville 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Colebrook 


25 


23 


23 


23 


24 


23 


Columbia 


23 


24 


22 


22 


22 


23 


Concord — Ward 1 


37 


37 


34 


34 


36 


35 


Concord — Ward 2 


16 


16 


16 


16 


18 


18 


Concord — Ward 3 


27 
80 
82 


28 
80 
85 


27 
79 
83 


26 
80 
83 


28 
78 
86 


27 




80 




83 


Concord — Ward 6 


86 


86 


87 


86 


84 


84 




69 
6 


71 
7 


68 
7 


70 
7 


70 
7 


71 


Concord — Ward 8 


8 




7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


Cornish 


22 


22 


21 


22 


21 


21 




5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 




22 
46 


23 
42 


22 
42 


21 
43 


25 
41 


24 




43 


Deering 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 




15 
19 


15 
19 


15 
19 


15 

18 


15 

17 


15 




17 







233 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DI STRI CT . — Continued. 



Dummer 

Dunbarton 

Enfield 

Errol 

Fitzwilliam 

Francestown 

Franconia 

Franklin — Ward 1 
Franklin — Ward 2 
Franklin — Ward 3 

Gilsnm 

Gorham 

Goshen 

Grafton 

Grantham 

Greenfield 

Greenville 

Groton 

Hancock 

Hanover 

Harrisville 

Haverhill 

Hebron 

Henniker 

Hill 

Hillsborough 

Hinsdale 

Holderness 

Hollis 

Hopkinton 

Jaffrey 

Jefferson 

Keene — Ward 1 . , 
Keene — Ward 2 . . 
Keene — Ward 3 .. 
Keene — Ward 4 . . 
Keene — Ward 5 . . 

Lancaster 

Landaff 

Langdon 

Lebanon 

Lempster 

Lincoln 



Alternate. 
Delegates-at-Large. 



Alternate. 

District 

Delegates. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



239 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. — Continued. 



Lisbon 

Littleton 

Livermore 

Lyman 

Lyme 

Lyndeborough . . 

Marlborough 

Marlow 

Mason 

Milan 

Milford 

Monroe 

Mont Vernon ... 
Nashua — Ward 1 
Nashua — Ward 2 
Nashua — Ward 3 
Nashua — Ward 4 
Nashua — Ward 5 
Nashua — Ward 6 
Nashua — Ward 7 
Nashua — Ward 8 
Nashua — Ward 9 

Nelson 

New Boston .... 

Newbury 

New Ipswich . . . 

New London 

Newport 

Northumberland 

Orange 

Orf ord 

Peterborough . . 

Piermont 

Pittsburg 

Plainfield 

Plymouth 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Rindge 

Roxbury . , 

Rumney 

Salisbury 

Sharon 

Shelburne 











Alternate. 




Alternate. 




District 


Delegates- 


at-Large 




Delegates. 




1 




c 

o 


Fh 






ti 










e) 


u 






g 




u 


eg 










o 


C 










,0 
U 

eg 


eg 


CD 


CO 


3 


M 


ft 




eg 


o 


3 


H 




£ 


CO 


H3 






OQ 


X 


m 


eg 


ft 


S 

eg 














S3 


eg 


•H 


to 
o 


a 


s 


M 


ft 


< 


« 


109 


£ 


97 


94 


96 


100 


99 


9 


9 


9 


9 


13 


11 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


5 


4 


5 


3 


34 


33 


33 


32 


31 


32 


28 


28 


29 


28 


30 


30 


19 


20 


20 


21 


19 


19 


10 


8 


9 


9 


9 


10 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


33 


31 


32 


31 


30 


30 


107 


107 


109 


109 


102 


103 


26 


25 


27 


28 


27 


27 


9 


9 


9 


9 


8 


9 


64 


67 


64 


65 


63 


64 


47 


49 


48 


47 


47 


48 


5 


6 


5 


5 


5 


5 


14 


21 


13 


14 


13 


14 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


9 


11 


8 


8 


9 


10 


30 


31 


30 


30 


31 


30 


24 


31 


25 


25 


25 


28 


9 


11 


10 


9 


9 


9 


12 


14 


14 


14 


10 


10 


29 


29 


29 


29 


29 


29 


18 


19 


19 


19 


20 


20 


18 


18 


18 


18 


17 


17 


33 


35 


35 


35 


36 


36 


93 


92 


94 


92 


95 


95 


13 


13 


13 


13 


13 


13 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


25 


45 


47 


45 


45 


44 


44 


21 


18 


21 


20 


22 


22 


9 


11 


12 


9 


8 


8 


38 


39 


37 


37 


34 


35 


69 


65 


70 


68 


61 


65 


9 


9 


9 


9 


8 


8 


4 


6 


6 


6 


5 


4 


34 


35 


34 


35 


34 


33 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


16 


16 


17 


16 


15 


15 


7 


6 


6 


6 


5 


5 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


15 






... 


14 


14 



240 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DI STRICT. — Concluded. 



Springfield . . 

Stark 

Stewartstown 

Stoddard 

Stratford .... 

Sullivan 

Sunapee 

Surry 

Sutton 

Swanzey 

Temple 

Thornton 

Troy 

Unity 

Walpole 

Warner 

Warren , 

Washington . . 
Waterville . . 

Weare 

Webster 

Wentworth 
Westmoreland 
Whitefield ... 

Wilmot , 

Wilton 

Winchester . 

Windsor 

Woodstock .. 



Alternate. 
Delegates-at-Large. 



Alternate. 

District 

Delegates. 



T3 








(8 









* 


>> 

13 




03 


£ 


m 






03 








fe 


< 


17 


17 


23 


23 


33 


29 


9 


9 


10 


10 


11 


11 


13 


13 


8 


6 


15 


14 


30 


30 


3 


3 


11 


11 


14 


14 


16 


16 


66 


68 


82 


77 


8 


9 


8 


9 


7 


7 


17 


17 


16 


16 


2 


2 


17 


16 


22 


23 


6 


6 


38 


35 


24 


23 


2 


2 


6 


6 



14 
23 

31 

8 
10 
12 
13 

6 
14 
29 

3 

11 
14 
16 
06 
76 

9 
10 

7 
17 
16 

2 

16 
22 

6 
35 
25 

2 



17 
25 
29 
9 

10 

12 

12 

6 

13 

29 

3 

10 

14 

17 

58 

73 

9 

6 

7 

17 

16 

3 

19 

23 

4 

35 

25 

2 

5 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 
REPUBLICAN PARTY. 



241 





Delegates-at-Large. 


Alternate 
Delegates-at-Large. 


SUMMARY. 


.2 

MS 


"3 

K 

be 

I 


9 

DO 

o 

3 
W 

<c 

bo 
u 
o 

9 

O 


u 

9 

M 

u 

c3 
Pi 

3 

H 
9 


+2 
u 
03 

A 

S 

.5 


o 

03 

a; 

P 
u 


1 

J 

S3 
03 

03 


< 



O 
09 


<o 

> 

9 
02 

d 

a 
'5 

9 


Rockingham . . . 

Strafford 

Belknap 

Carroll 

Merrimack 

Hillsborough . . 

Cheshire 

Sullivan 

Grafton 


431 
229 
356 

♦145 
468 

1,078 
115 
159 
338 
166 


1,133 
676 
487 
438 
1,238 
2,116 
594 
479 
803 
488 


1,060 
600 
769 
431 
1,260 
2,055 
581 
496 
905 
481 


1,246 1,175 
567 | 587 
786 I 766 
440 364 
1,329 1,143 
2,503 2,336 
590 546 
513 430 
994 936 
484 439 


1,225 
591 
700 
466 
1,244 
2,282 
543 
416 
890 
438 


1,219 
681 
679 
464 
1,258 
2,343 
556 
426 
891 
423 


1,225 1,243 
589 600 
706 696 
467 456 
1,221 1,215 
2,271 2,270 
553 654 
414 413 
915 880 
449 417 






8,780 




Total vote... 


3,485 j 8,452 8,638 


9,452 8,722 


8,795 


8,840 


8,743 



SUMMARY. 



Rockingham 
Strafford ... 
Belknap .... 

Carroll 

Merrimack . 
Hillsborough 

Cheshire 

Sullivan 

Grafton 

Coos 

Total vote 



1,348 
638 
770 
522 
351 

1,676 



5,305 



Delegates. 



1,345 
640 
771 
524 
349 

1,760 



5,389 



1,015 
855 
690 
524 
929 
621 



4,534 



1,000 
847 
634 
474 
937 
538 



4,430 



Alternate Delegates. 



1,254 
618 
631 
451 
290 

1,524 



4,768 



1,211 
615 
633 
447 
287 

1,505 



924 
752 
554 
368 
906 
436 



3,940 



561 
428 
877 
434 



4.005 



242 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 
DEMOCRATIC PARTY. 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. 



Delegates-at-Large. 



District 
Delegates. 



nt 



w . 

CO 

w 



© rt 

> ° 

3 



03 w 

h3 



& 

© 

6 

© 

a 

9 

16 
21 

4 

3 
35 
16 

9 
13 

5 

6 
17 
12 
19 
10 

4 
30 
66 

2 
27 
30 

6 
11 

6 

6 
32 

8 
10 
14 
19 
107 



Albany 

Allenstown . — 

Alton 

Atkinson 

Auburn 

Barnstead 

Bartlett 

Bedford 

Belmont 

Brentwood 

Brookfield 

Candia 

Canterbury 

Center Harbor . 

Chatham 

Chester , 

Chichester 

Conway 

Danville 

Deerfield 

Derry 

Dover — Ward 1 
Dover — Ward 2 
Dover — Ward 3 
Dover — Ward 4 
Dover — Ward 5 

Durham 

East Kingston 

Eaton 

Effingham 

Epping 

Epsom 

Exeter 

Parmington 

Freedom 

Fremont 

Gilford 

Gilmanton ..... 

Goffstown 

Greenland 

Hampstead 

Hampton 

Hampton Falls 



34 
11 
11 
14 
22 
117 
28 

9 
19 
31 

8 

18 
30 
52 
11 
18 
12 

2 



34 
11 
11 
14 
25 
113 



34 
11 
10 
14 
19 
116 



34 
11 
10 
14 
23 
111 
28 
9 
19 
30 
8 
17 
29 
51 
11 
18 
12 



11 
13 
22 
105 
27 
9 
19 
30 
8 
14 
29 
45 
11 
18 
12 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



243 



Delegates-at-Large. 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DI STRICT. — Continued. 



Hart's Location ... 

Hooksett 

Hudson 

Jackson 

Kensington 

Kingston 

Laconia — Ward 1 . 
Laconia — Ward 2 . 
Laconia — Ward 3 . 
Laconia— Ward 4 . 
Laconia — Ward 5 . 
Laconia — Ward 6 . 

Lee 

Litchfield 

Londonderry 

Loudon 

Madbury 

Madison 

Manchester — Ward 
Manchester — Ward 
Manchester — Ward 
Manchester — Ward 
Manchester — Ward 
Manchester — Ward 
Manchester — Ward 
Manchester — Ward 8 
Manchester — Ward 9 
Manchester — Ward 10 
Manchester — Ward 11 
Manchester — Ward 12 
Manchester — Ward 13 

Meredith 

Merrimack 

Middleton 

"Milton 

Moulton horough 

New Hampton 

Newcastle 

Newfields 

Newington 

Newmarket 

Newton 

North Hampton 

Northfield 



It 



21 
16 
12 

15 

42 
32 
13 
32 
32 
47 
18 
17 
10 
32 
11 
7 
17 
16 
20 
13 
79 
33 
79 
32 
12 
27 
52 
15 
20 
38 
23 
16 
2 
5 
6 
16 
3 
21 
165 
5 
16 
26 






21 
16 
12 
13 
44 
32 
13 
32 
33 
48 
18 
17 
10 
33 
11 
7 
18 
16 
20 
14 
85 
31 
82 
34 
12 
30 
55 
15 
21 
31 
23 
16 
3 
5 
8 

16 
3 
21 
165 
6 
16 
25 



18 
17 
11 
10 
43 
30 
13 
33 
32 
41 
18 
17 
10 
32 
11 
7 

19 
13 
19 
15 
76 
32 
73 
31 
12 
25 
43 
16 
20 
33 
24 
16 
3 
5 
5 

16 
3 

20 

165 

6 

14 
24 



District 
Delegates. 



> ° 



12 

28 

53 

15 

20 

36 

23 

16 

2 

5 

6 

16 

3 

21 

165 

6 

15 

25 



t> o 
fl,52 



23 

12 
27 
26 
44 
17 
15 

9 
31 
10 

6 
1!) 

k; 

21 
17 
88 
33 
si 
36 
12 
28 
52 
18 
20 



2 


2 


9 


7 


19 


19 


15 


16 


10 


8 


16 


12 


37 


36 



22 


20 


16 


16 


3 


4 


4 


4 


4 


5 


16 


16 


3 


3 


21 


20 


165 


165 


5 


6 


14 


12 


25 


24 



244 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT.— Concluded. 



Northwood 

Nottingham 

Ossipee 

Felham 

Pembroke 

Pittsfield 

Plaistow 

Portsmouth — Ward 1 
Portsmouth — Ward 2 
Portsmouth — Ward 3 
Portsmouth — Ward 4 
Portsmouth — Ward 5 

Raymond 

Rochester — Ward 1 .. 
Rochester- — Ward 2 . . 
Rochester — Ward 3 . . 
Rochester — Ward 4 . . 
Rochester — Ward 5 . . 
Rochester — Ward 6 . . 

Rollinsf ord 

Rye 

Salem 

Sanbornton 

Sandown 

Sandwich 

Seabrook 

Somersworth — Ward 1 
Somersworth — Ward 2 
Somersworth — Ward 3 
Somersworth— Ward 4 
Somersworth — Ward 5 

Strafford 

Stratham 

Tamworth 

Tilton 

Tuf tonboro 

Wakefield 

Windham 

Wolfeboro 



Delegates-at-Large. 



District 
Delegates. 



fro 



13 
15 
44 
10 
52 
47 
12 
21 
19 
37 
12 
10 
49 

6 
15 

3 
25 

2 

3 
25 
27 
23 
21 
22 
32 

7 



157 
44 
13 

2 
14 
23 
17 
10 

6 
23 



13 
15 

48 
12 
56 
50 
13 
22 
18 
36 
13 
10 
48 

6 
15 

3 
24 

2 

3 
26 
29 



31 



70 

160 

45 

13 

2 

13 

26 

18 

10 

8 

24 



3 

24 

29 

21 

18 

18 

31 

7 

36 

80 

70 

159 

43 

13 

1 

7 

25 

17 

9 

7 

20 



b> o 

~ to 



24 
21 
22 
35 

8 
37 
79 
68 
157 
45 
12 

2 
14 
24 
17 
10 

7 



o o 



13 
15 
43 
10 
50 
45 
11 
21 
16 
34 
12 
10 
47 

6 
13 

3 
24 

2 

3 

24 
28 
23 
20 
19 
28 

7 

8 
75 
69 
147 
45 
14 

2 
13 
25 
18 
10 
8 
20 



E 

<D 

6 

CO 

03 

a 

(3 

i-s 

13 
15 
47 
12 
48 
38 
10 
19 
16 
31 
10 
9 
40 
6 

12 
3 

21 

2 

3 

25 

26 

17 

20 

17 

31 

7 

6 

69 

60 

141 

42 

14 

7 

13 

22 

17 

8 

6 

23 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



245 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. 



Acworth i 

Alexandria 

Alstead , 

Amherst 

Antrim 

Ashland 

Bath 

Bennington 

Benton 

Berlin — Ward 1 
Berlin — Ward 2 
Berlin — Ward 3 
Berlin — Ward 4 

Bethlehem 

Boscawen 

Bow 

Bradford 

Bristol 

Brookline 

Campton 

Canaan 

Carroll 

Charlestown ... 

Chesterfield 

Claremont 

Clarksville 

Colebrook 

Columbia 

Concord — Ward 1 
Concord — Ward 
Con cord — Ward 
Concord — Ward 
Concord — Ward 
Concord — Ward 
Concord — Ward 
Concord — Ward 8 
Concord — Ward 9 

Cornish 

Croydon , 

Dalton 

Dan bury 

Deering 



Delegates-at-Large. 



District 
Delegates. 



§£ 



10 



30 
20 
15 
106 
23 
27 
14 
26 
14 
15 
26 
17 
25 
12 
17 
11 
12 
5 
18 
47 
17 



E^ 



10 



22 
6 
16 
60 
10 
9 
37 
31 
24 
14 
119 
23 
31 
13 
26 
14 
16 
24 
17 
25 
12 
21 
11 
12 
5 
18 
48 
17 






12 

4 
27 
SI 
13 

9 

14 
12 
19 

6 

1 

21 
21 

6 

16 
61 
10 

9 
39 
30 
20 
16 
106 
23 
28 
14 
26 
14 
15 
25 
17 
24 
10 
21 
11 
12 

5 
18 
49 
15 



o w 



24:0 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL, 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. — Continued. 



Dorchester 

Dublin 

Dummer 

Dunbarton 

Easton 

Enfield 

Errol 

Fitzwilliam 

Francestown 

Franconia 

Franklin — Ward 1 
Franklin — Ward 2 
Franklin — Ward 3 

Gilsum 

G-orham 

Goshen 

Grafton 

Grantham 

Greenfield 

Greenville 

Groton 

Hancock 

Hanover 

Harrisville 

Haverhill 

Hebron 

Henniker 

Hill 

Hillsborough 

Hinsdale 

Holderness 

Hollis 

Hopkinton 

Jaff rey 

Jefferson 

Keene — Ward 1 . . 
Keene — Ward 2 
Keene — Ward 3 .. 
Keene — Ward 4 
Keene — Ward 5 .., 

Lancaster 

Landaff 

Lansrdon 

Lebanon 



Delegates-at-Large. 



Sfe 






8 



1 

2 

10 
14 

9 
45 
12 

4 

11 ! 
10 I 

6 

24 
15 

4 

6 

10 
15 
13 
12 
23 

9 
19 
18 
21 
12 



District 
Delegates. 



pi 

s . 



s£ 



24 


23 


6 


6 


27 


25 


8 


8 


18 


16 


5 


5 


58 


60 


70 


63 


36 


34 


R 


5 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



247 





Delegates-at-Larg 


e. 


District 
Delegates. 


SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. — Continued. 


el 

03 

d 
a 
u 

w 

■if 

e3 w 

1-5 


1 
'o 

&* § 

BE 

W 


o 

03 

K 

H 

<s 
» 


o — 


o 

u 


$ 

03 
ffl 

w 
s 

1 




21 

4 
84 
19 

1 
19 
13 
13 
11 

4 

1 

17 
21 

5 
10 
10 
14 
19 

6 
17 
14 
19 
29 
21 

3 
16 
24 

4 
20 
31 
15 

5 
13 
31 

9 

7 
38 
56 

5 

9 

J 

28 
7 


21 

4 

92 

20 

1 

19 

13 

14 

9 

4 

1 

17 

21 

5 

10 

10 

12 

18 

6 

17 

14 

17 

25 

22 

3 

17 

24 

4 

21 

29 

15 

5 

13 

30 

8 

7 

38 

54 

4 

9 

6 

1 

31 

7 


20 

4 

82 

16 

*15 
11 
12 
9 
3 
1 

15 

21 

4 

9 

8 

14 

15 

6 

17 

14 

19 

30 

20 

3 

13 

23 

4 

19 

29 

12 

5 

11 

23 

8 

7 

38 

55 

3 

7 

6 

1 

18 

7 


20 

4 

82 

18 

1 

17 

13 

12 

10 

3 

1 

17 

19 

4 

8 

10 

11 

18 

6 

17 

12 

14 

30 

28 

3 

17 

24 

4 

20 

31 

14 

5 

13 

27 

8 

7 

38 

56 

4 

9 

6 

1 

30 

6 


20 

4 

80 

19 

1 

19 

11 

14 

7 

4 

1 

16 

19 

4 

9 

10 

14 

17 

6 

17 

12 

15 

25 

22 

3 

16 

24 

4 

21 

29 

13 

3 

11 

28 

8 

7 

37 

52 

4 

7 

6 

1 

30 

7 


19 

4 

74 

14 

1 

18 

9 

11 

7 

3 

1 

14 

16 

3 

7 

8 

11 

13 

6 

17 

17 

17 

31 

28 

3 


Lincoln 


Lisbon 




Livermore 


Lyman 


Lyme 


Lyndeborough 


Marlborough 


Marlow 


Mason 


Milan 


Milford 


Monroe 


Mont Vernon 


Nashua — Ward 1 


Nashua — Ward 2 


Nashua — Ward 3 


Nashua — Ward 4 


Nashua — Ward 5 


Nashua — Ward 6 


Nashua — Ward 7 


Nashua — Ward 8 


Nashua — Ward 9 


Nelson 




13 


Newbury 


23 




4 


New London 


18 




27 




11 




3 


Orford 

Peterborough 


8 
25 

8 


Pittsburg 


7 




37 


Plymouth 


48 




4 




7 


Rindge 

Roxbury 


6 

1 

19 




6 







248 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. — Concluded. 



Delegates-at-Large. 



District 
Delegates. 



Bt 



ft g 

IP 



© 
t> ° 

si 



o v -' 



Sharon 

Shelburne 

Springfield 

Stark 

Stewartstown 

Stoddard 

Stratford 

Sullivan 

Sunapee 

Surry 

Sutton 

Swanzey 

Temple 

Thornton 

Unity 

Walpole 

Warner 

Warren 

Washington 

Weare 

Webster 

Wentworth 

Wentworth's Location 

Westmoreland 

Whitefield 

Wilmot 

Wilton 

Winchester 

Windsor 

Woodstock 



9 

8 

18 

17 

14 

14 

2 

16 

3 

21 

25 

1 

3 

14 

60 

29 

4 

6 

17 

18 

17 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



249 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. 



Albany 

Allenstown 

Alton 

Atkinson 

Auburn 

Barnstead 

Bartlett 

Bedford 

Belmont 

Brentwood 

Brookfield 

Candia 

Canterbury 

Center Harbor 

Chatham 

Chester 

Chichester 

Conway 

Danville 

Deerfield 

Derry 

Dover — Ward 1 
Dover — Ward 2 
Dover — Ward 3 
Dover — Ward 4 
Dover — Ward 5 

Durham 

East Kingston . 

Eaton 

Effingham 

Epping 

Epsom 

Exeter 

Farmington 

Freedom 

Fremont 

Gilford 

Gilmanton 

Goff stown 

Greenland 

Hampstead 

Hampton 

Hampton Falls 
Hart's Location 



Alternate 
Delegates-at-Large. 



Alternate 

District 

Delegates. 



i* 



16 
21 

4 

3 

28 
15 

6 
16 

4 

6 
18 
13 
17 

1 

3 
26 
50 

2 
28 
27 

7 
10 

6 

7 
30 
11 

8 

10 

16 

111 

22 

9 

19 
28 

8 
12 
27 
42 
11 
18 
11 

2 

2 



i— i os 



8 

15 
21 

4 
3 
28 

if; 

6 
16 

5 

6 
18 
14 
17 

1 

3 
27 
48 

2 
28 
27 

7 
10 

6 

7 

30 
11 

9 

10 

16 

118 

22 

9 

20 
29 

8 
14 
27 
42 
11 
18 
11 

2 






7 

14 
21 

4 

3 

28 
15 

6 
15 

5 

6 
16 
13 
17 
10 

3 
26 
49 

2 
29 
27 

7 
10 

6 

7 
30 
11 

8 

10 
19 
108 



Eh . 



10 
17 
105 
22 
9 
19 




o 

03 



s£ 



29 

8 

9 

10 

15 

102 

21 

9 

17 
27 

8 
12 
26 
43 
11 
18 
11 



eS 

a 

m 
JL 

7 

15 

21 

4 

3 

31 

17 

6 

16 

4 

6 

13 

13 

17 

4 

2 

25 

67 

2 



10 
21 
104 
21 

9 

18 
29 

8 
11 
28 
42 
11 
18 
11 



250 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DI STRICT. — Continued. 



Hooksett 

Hudson 

Jackson 

Kensington 

Kingston 

Laconia — Ward 1 

Laconia — Ward 2 

Laconia — Ward 3 

Laconia — Ward 4 

Laconia — Ward 5 

Laconia — Ward 6 

Lee 

Litchfield 

Londonderry 

Loudon 

Madbury 

Madison 

Manchester — Ward 1 
Manchester — Ward 2 
Manchester — Ward 3 
Manchester — Ward 4 
Manchester — Ward 5 
Manchester — Ward 6 
Manchester — Ward 7 
Manchester — Ward 8 
Manchester — Ward 9 
Manchester — Ward 10 
Manchester — Ward 11 
Manchester — Ward 12 
Manchester — Ward 13 

Meredith 

Merrimack 

Middleton 

Milton 

Moultonborough , 

New Hampton , 

Newcastle , 

Newfields 

Newington 

Newmarket 

Newton 

North Hampton 

Northfield 

Northwood 



Alternate 
Delegates-at-Large. 



!* 



7 

18 

18 

7 

16 
31 
20 
11 
26 
22 
40 
17 
17 
10 
25 
8 
6 

18 

14 

19 

12 

71 

26 

66 

28 

12 

27 

44 

10 

18 

29 

17 

16 

2 

5 

6 

15 

3 

21 

165 

6 

13 

25 

13 



J 
&H 



Ife 



7 
15 
18 

7 

15 
30 
20 
11 
26 
24 
40 
17 
17 

9 
25 

8 

6 

18 
13 
19 
15 
64 
27 
67 
33 
12 
29 
42 
12 
18 
27 
19 
16 

2 

5 

5 
16 

3 
22 
165 

6 
14 
25 
13 



18 

13 

19 

12 

69 

26 

67 

29 

12 

29 

43 

11 

18 

28 

18 

16 

2 

5 

5 

15 

3 

21 

165 

6 

13 

25 

13 



"Sfe 

-d w 
o 



18 

14 

19 

15 

66 

26 

65 

31 

12 

27 

45 

11 

18 

29 

18 

16 

2 

5 

6 

15 

3 

21 

165 

6 

14 

23 

13 



Alternate 
District 
Delegates. 



>> 




ffi 




PI 

o 

C3 


d 


g • 


+5 • 


. d 


*a 


i-s g 


s» 




ear 1 




s£ 




eg 
f~5 


* 


6 


6 


18 


20 



17 
7 

16 
30 
20 
10 
24 
20 
36 
17 
13 
10 
23 
8 
6 
17 
14 
19 
14 
79 
26 
72 
31 
12 
29 
39 
12 
19 
22 
17 
16 
2 
4 
6 
15 
3 
21 
165 
5 
14 
25 
13 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



251 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. — Concluded. 



Alternate 

Delegates-at-Large. 






Nottingham 

Ossipee 

Pelham 

Pembroke 

Pittsfield 

Plaistow 

Portsmouth — Ward 1 . 
Portsmouth — Ward 2 . 
Portsmouth — Ward 3 . 
Portsmouth — Ward 4 . 
Portsmouth — Ward 5 . 

Raymond 

Rochester — Ward 1 
Rochester — Ward 2 
Rochester — Ward 3 ... 
Rochester — Ward 4 
Rochester — Ward 5 
Rochester — Ward 6 

Rollinsford 

Rye 

Salem 

Sanbornton 

Sandown 

Sandwich 

Seabrook 

Somersworth — Ward 1 
Somersworth — "Ward 2 
Somersworth — Ward 3 
Somersworth — Ward 4 
Somersworth — Ward 5 

Strafford 

Stratham 

Tamworth , 

Tilton 

Tuftonboro 

Wakefield , 

Windham , 

Wolfeboro 



15 

2 

18 

2 

3 

24 

27 

22 

20 

15 

28 

5 

5 

67 

63 

134 

37 

11 

2 

13 
26 
18 



ti 


© 


tJ 


£ 


cS 


o 


A 


»-3 


,-, 


.<"■*» 


Eh c 


1-5 C 


o 


O 














Sfc 




w. 


a 


15 


15 


32 


32 


8 


6 


38 


37 


36 


36 


13 


13 


21 


21 


17 


18 


34 


33 


13 


14 


10 


10 


49 


45 


6 


6 


15 


15 


2 


2 


19 


19 


2 


2 


3 


3 


25 


24 


27 


26 


23 


22 


20 


21 


' 17 


15 


27 


28 


5 


5 


6 


6 


68 


67 


64 


64 


138 


137 


37 


36 


12 


11 


2 


2 


13 


13 


24 


24 


18 


18 


9 


9 


7 


8 


22 


21 



05 i° 



15 
34 

7 
38 
40 
12 
22 
18 
33 
14 
10 
44 

6 
15 

2 
20 

2 

3 
24 
27 
23 
22 
15 
28 

5 

5 

67 
64 
135 
37 
11 

2 
13 
27 
18 



Alternate 

District 

Delegates. 



t-3 C 

an H 



59 
137 
36 
12 
2 
10 
26 
18 



2? 



P4C 



13 

3 

20 

'*3 

22 
25 
23 
22 
19 
29 
5 
6 

66 
60 
134 
32 
13 
2 

10 
26 
18 



252 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. 



Acworth 

Alexandria 

Alstead 

Amherst 

Antrim 

Ashland 

Bath 

Bennington 

Benton 

Berlin — Ward 1 . 
Berlin — Ward 2 . 
Berlin — Ward 3 . 
Berlin — Ward 4 . 

Bethlehem 

Boscawen 

Bow 

Bradford 

Bristol 

Brookline 

Campton 

Canaan 

Carroll 

Charlestown 

Chesterfield 

Claremont 

Clarksville 

Colebrook 

Columbia 

Concord — Ward 1 
Concord — Ward 2 
Concord — Ward 3 
Concord — Ward 4 
Concord — Ward 5 
Concord — Ward 6 
Concord — Ward 7 
Concord — Ward 8 
Concord — Ward 9 

Cornish 

Croydon 

Dalton 

Danbury 

Deering 

Dorchester 

Dublin 

Dummer 



Alternate 
Delegates-at-Large. 



gfc 



©.3 
as v-< 

■sfe 



ik 



Eh 



Alternate 
District 
Delegates. 



bg 

si 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



253 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT.— Continued. 



Dunbarton 

Easton 

Enfield 

Errol 

Fitzwilliam 

Francestown 

Franconia 

Franklin — Ward 1 
Franklin — Ward 2 
Franklin — Ward 3 

Gilsum 

Gorham 

Goshen 

Grafton 

Grantham 

Greenfield 

Greenville 

Groton 

Eancock 

Hanover 

Harrisville 

Haverhill 

Hebron 

Henniker 

Hill 

Hillsborough 

Hinsdale 

Holderness 

Mollis 

Elopkinton 

Taffrey 

Jeff erson 

Keene — Ward 1 . . . 
£eene — Ward 2 . . . 
£eene — Ward 3 . . . 
£eene— Ward 4 ... 
£eene — Ward 5 . . . 
jancaster 

andaff 

angdon 

jebanon 

empster 

incoln 

isbon 

ittleton 



Alternate 
Delegates-at-Large. 



W 



IN 



Eh C 
o 

i—i '■>■ 



£Z 



14 
10 

41 

12 

3 

11 

10 

5 

21 

14 

3 

5 

10 

14 

11 

11 

13 

8 

20 

18 

19 

12 

9 

20 

6 

26 

6 

18 

5 

56 

62 

34 

5 

2 

3 

3 

9 

22 

11 

3 

21 

19 

4 

72 
16 



14 

11 

41 

11 
3 

11 
9 

5 

21 

15 

3 

5 
10 
14 
11 

9 
14 

8 
20 
18 
17 
12 

9 
20 

6 
25 

6 
18 

5 
58 
61 
38 

5 

2 

4 

4 

9 

23 
11 

3 
21 
18 

4 

73 
16 I 



Eh 



Alternate 


District 


Delegates. 




c 




o 






r* 


X 


03 


9 


©^ 


M~ 


C 


a 


©2 


MS 










g£ 


■g* 




*"-' 


i ^ 


fi 



23 

14 

3 

4 

10 
13 
10 
10 
13 
7 

18 
18 
20 
12 
9 

20 

6 

24 

7 

16 

3 

58 

61 

34 

6 

2 

5 

4 

9 

24 

10 

3 

24 

19 

4 

76 
14 



13 
10 

9 
14 

7 
17 
18 
18 
12 

9 
20 

6 
24 

7 
17 

3 
56 
51 
33 

5 

2 

5 

3 

9 
23 
10 

3 
24 
19 

4 
70 
13 



254 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT.— Continued. 



Livermore 

Lyman 

Lyme 

Lyndeborough . . . 

Marlborough 

Marlow 

Mason 

Milan 

Milford 

Monroe 

Mont Vernon 
Nashua — Ward 1 
Nashua — Ward 2 
Nashua — Ward 3 
Nashua — Ward 4 
Nashua — Ward 5 
Nashua — Ward 6 
Nashua — Ward 7 
Nashua — Ward 8 
Nashua — Ward 9 

Nelson 

New Boston 

Newbury 

New Ipswich 

New London 

Newport 

Northumberland . 

Orange 

Orford 

Peterborough 

Piermont 

Pittsburg 

Plainfield 

Plymouth 

Randolph 

Richmond 

Rindge 

Roxbury 

Rumney 

Salisbury 

Sharon 

Shelburne 

Springfield 

Stark 



Alternate 
Delegates-at-Large. 



Alternate 

District 

Delegates. 



En 



18 



*'? 

i—i W 

It 

a 

W 

1 

16 
10 
13 



1 

16 
17 

3 

9 

10 
11 
16 

6 
17 
12 
17 
27 
20 

3 

15 
23 

4 
19 
25 
14 

5 

8 
25 

8 

7 
42 
49 

4 



18 



■5* 



H c 
o 



1 ! 
14 j 
10 
13 

7 

3 

1 
16 ! 
19 I 



51 



|| 
<^ 

1 
15 
9 

13 
7 
3 
1 
16 
18 



18 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



255 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT.— Concluded. 



Stewartstown 

Stoddard 

Stratford 

Sullivan 

Sunapee 

Surry 

Sutton 

Swanzey 

Temple 

Thornton 

Unity 

Walpole 

Warner 

Warren 

Washington 

Weare 

Webster 

Wentworth , 

Wentworth's Location 

Westmoreland 

Whitefield 

Wilmot 

Wilton 

Winchester 

Windsor 

Woodstock 



Alternate 
Delegates-at-Large. 



Alternate 

District 

Delegates. 



ft 



it 

En 



^c 



m 



o . 
d? 

cr 

13 

12 

13 

2 

15 

1 

20 

23 

1 

3 

4 

40 

24 

3 

7 

17 

19 

14 

8 

3 

14 

18 

47 

12 

2 

3 



13 
13 
14 

1 
15 

2 
10 
2:5 

1 

3 

4 

v.\ 

24 

2 

7 

17 

18 

15 

8 

3 

13 

10 

48 

12 

2 

4 



256 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 
DEMOCRATIC PARTY. 















Alternate 






Delegates-at-Large. 




Delegates-at-Large. 


SUMMARY. 


g 

a 
a 
u 

ffl 


w . 




s 


as 
ft 


e3 


9 

o 


o 




fc§ 


fcg 


h 


t> o 


02 © 


o 


S3 


Hfl 




<OyZ 






be 


03 


*J3 

15 


"3.9 

IS 


0> 03 

S3 

.2^ 


C3^ 












^a w 


03 w 




.d^ 




*~i 


w 


w 


3 


&H 


w 


H 


o 


Rockingham. ... 


829 


834 


799 


819 


777 


799 


799 


788 


Strafford 


637 


644 


632 


634 


537 


548 


543 


543 


Belknap 


434 


433 


384 


440 


352 


350 


351 


367 


Carroll 


332 


348 


315 


337 


287 


286 


294 


291 


Merrimack 


785 


799 


742 


784 


695 


694 


693 


674 


Hillsborough . . . 


1,064 


1,081 


1,008 


1,069 


893 


897 


812 


894 


Cheshire 


331 


328 


282 


320 


268 


269 


267 


273 


Sullivan 


316 


333 


292 


314 


237 


231 


228 


237 


Grafton 


659 


668 


610 


650 


607 


602 


602 


601 




369 


379 


335 


367 


336 


338 


350 


339 






Total votes. . . 


5,756 


5,847 


5,399 


5,734 


4,989 


5,014 


4,939 


6,007 







Delegates. 




Alternate Delegates. 




o 

a 




<D 




>> 






PI 




a 
o 




2 


h 


PI 






o 

•*> 




o 








o 


a 










. 


pi 


03 


■5 


03 


M 


pi 


SUMMARY. 


S 




^ 


ffl 


a 


a 


03 








^ 


.^. 


w 




fli^ 


©>4 


^ 




gfi 


CI 


Ofi 


t-» ri 


PI 


. pi 


rig 

03 




S- 


o 

CO 


o 

+3 03 


a 




pi o 

PI CO 






sg 


B 


•2^ 


# c3 


a£ 


§£ 


m 












£ 




£~ 








A 


s 
737 


ti 


1-3 


< 


Q 


Rockingham ... 


788 






765 


771 






Strafford 


572 


552 






527 


523 




.... 


Belknap 


386 


361 






337 


344 




.... 




326 
254 


337 
229 


'514 


*447 


281 
203 


312 

205 


'488 




Merrimack 


482 


Hillsborough . . 


564 


488 


480 


439 


475 


476 


384 


387 


Cheshire 






291 


280 






257 


244 


Sullivan 






242 


225 






212 


207 


Grafton 






572 


512 






556 


542 








348 


314 






326 


321 







Total votes. .. 


2,8 


2,704 


2,447 


2,217 


2,588 


2,631 


: 2,223 


2,183 



*] 

H 










> 




tiK 


i "QBEMe- 




u 




iittlf 


^t 


w 


Q 

o 




TJ 






• 


» 


DO 


1 11 




2^ ^1 


k 


o 






BEST^ 


k 




1 


W .-,*■*»» 








- 









HEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



257 



PROGRESSIVE PARTY. 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. 



.llenstown 

Jton 

larnstead 

larrington 

lartlett 

edford 

irentwood 

iandia 

(enter Harbor 

!li at ham 

heater 

Ihichester 

lonway 

>eerfield 

>erry 

>over — Ward 3 

•over — Ward 4 

hirham 

last Kingston 

ipping 

!xeter 

'reedom 

•ilf ord 

•ilmanton 

offstown 

[ampstead 

[ampton 

[ndson 

ackson 

iaconia — Ward 1 ... 
iaconia — Ward 2 ... 
iaconia — Ward 3 ... 
iaconia — Ward 4 ... 
iaconia — Ward 6 ... 

ee 

litchfield 

Tadbury 

Tanchester — Ward 1 
Tanchester — Ward 2 
Tan Chester — Ward 3 
Tanchester — Ward 4 
[an Chester — Ward 5 



Delegates-at-Large. 



District 
Delegates. 



258 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT.— Concluded. 



Manchester — Ward 6 
Manchester — Ward 7 
Manchester — Ward 8 
Manchester — Ward 11 
Manchester — Ward 12 

Meredith 

Merrimack 

Milton 

Newmarket 

Newton 

Northfield 

Ossipee 

Pelham 

Pembroke 

Pittsfield 

Plaistow 

Portsmouth — Ward 2 
Portsmouth — Ward 4 
Portsmouth — Ward 5 

Raymond 

Rochester — Ward 3 . . 
Rochester — Ward 6 .. 

Rollinsf ord 

Rye 

Salem 

Sanbornton , 

Sandown 

Sandwich 

Somersworth — Ward 1 
Somersworth — Ward 2 

Stratham 

Windham 

Wolfeboro 



Delegates-at-Large 



District 
Delegates. 



o 



Z5TEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



259 



Delegates-at-Large. 



District 
Delegates. 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. 



Acworth 

Amherst 

Antrim 

Ashland 

Bennington 

Berlin — Ward 1 . . 
Berlin — Ward 2 . . 
Berlin — Ward 3 .. 

Boscawen 

Bradford 

Bristol 

Canaan 

Charlestown 

Chesterfield 

Claremont 

Colebrook 

Concord — Ward 1 
Concord — Ward 3 
Concord — Ward 4 
Concord — Ward 6 
Concord — Ward 7 

Cornish 

Croydon 

Danbury 

Deering 

Dublin 

Dunbarton 

Enfield 

Errol 

Franconia 

Franklin — Ward 1 
Franklin — Ward 3 

Gilsum 

Gorham 

G-raf ton 

Grantham 

Hanover 

Haverhill 

Henniker 

Hollis 

Hopkinton 

Jaffrey 

Keene — Ward 1 . . 
Keene — Ward 2 . . 
Keene — Ward 4 . . 



















O) 




U 


■g 




0< 
IB 


o 


w 


& 


w 










ft 


£ 




a 


M 








o 


£ 






ce 




£ 


c 


ni 


fc 




£ 



1 


1 


3 


3 1 


7 


7 


25 


25 


1 


1 


2 


1 


5 


5 


3 


2 


14 


14 


1 


1 


5 


5 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


6 


6 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


8 


8 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


4 


4 


1 


1 


1 


2 ' 


1 


1 


12 


12 


5 


5 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 



260 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. — Concluded. 



Keene — Ward 5 

Lancaster 

Lebanon 

Lempster 

Lisbon 

Littleton 

Lyman 

Lyndeborough . 
Marlborough . . . 
Milford 



Nashua — Ward 
Nashua — Ward 
Nashua — Ward 
Nashua — Ward 
Nashua — Ward 
Nashua — Ward 
New Boston . .. 
New Ipswich . 
New London . . 
Peterborough . 

Piermont 

Pittsburg 

Plainfield 

Plymouth 

Richmond 

Rindge 

Rumney 

Springfield 

Stewartstown . 

Stoddard 

Sutton 

Swanzey 

Temple 

Troy 

Unity 

Walpole 

Warner 

Warren 

Weare 

Webster 

Wentworth 
Whitefield 

Wilton 

Winchester . . 



Delegates-at-Large. 



District 
Delegates. 



o 

d 

•^ o 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



261 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. 



Allenstown 

Alton 

Barnstead 

Barrington 

Bartlett 

Bedford 

Brentwood 

Candia 

Center Harbor 

Chatham 

Chester 

Chichester 

Conway 

Deeriield 

Derry 

Dover — Ward 3 

Dover — Ward 4 

Durham 

East Kingston 

Epping 

Exeter 

Freedom 

Gilford 

Gilmanton 

Goffstown 

Hampstead 

Hampton 

Hudson 

Jackson 

Laconia — Ward 2 

Laconia — Ward 3 

Laconia — Ward 4 

Lee 

Litchfield 

Madbury 

Manchester — Ward 1 
Manchester — Ward 2 
Manchester — Ward 3 
Manchester — Ward 4 
Manchester — Ward 5 
Manchester — Ward 6 
Manchester — Ward 7 
Manchester — Ward 8 
Manchester — Ward 11 
Manchester — Ward 12 



Alternate 
Delegates-at-Large. 



Alternate 

District 

Delegates. 



262 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. — Concluded. 



Alternate 
Delegates-at-Large. 



Meredith 

Merrimack 

Milton 

Newmarket 

Newton 

Northfield 

Ossipee 

Pelham 

Pembroke 

Plaistow 

Portsmouth — Ward 2 . 
Portsmouth — Ward 4 . 
Portsmouth — Ward 5 . 

Raymond 

Rochester — Ward 3 
Rochester — Ward 6 ... 

Rollinsf ord 

Rye 

Salem 

Sanbornton 

Sandown 

Sandwich 

Somersworth — Ward 1 
Somersworth — Ward 2 

Stratham 

Windham 

Wolfeboro 



Alternate 
District 

Delegates. 



1 


1 




2 


1 


... 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 



NEW HAMPSHIKE MANUAL. 



263 













Alternate 






Alternate 




District 




Delegates 


-at-Large. 


Delegates. 


SECOND 


u 










ti 


CONGRESSIONAL 









^ 




DISTRICT. 


1 


o 

o 




o 
Eh 


h3 




H 


H 


Ph 


* 


J 


6 




^ 


<a> 


tj 


02 


J 






be 














o 






fl 


"S 




O 




tn 




C 
1-3 


^ 
^ 


Acworth 


1 




i 






Amherst 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Antrim 


6 


G 


6 


6 


6 


6 




20 
1 


20 
1 


20 
1 


20 
1 


18 
1 


18 






Berlin — Ward 1 






1 








Berlin — Ward 2 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 




2 


1 


2 


1 


1 1 




14 

1 


13 

1 


12 
1 


12 

1 


12 12 


Bradford 


1 1 


Bristol 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 4 




2 
2 


2 

2 


2 

2 


2 
2 


2 2 


Charlestown 






2 


2 


2 


2 


2 2 


Claremont 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 


Colebrook 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 2 


Concord — Ward 1 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 5 


Concord — Ward 3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 


Concord — Ward 4 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 


Concord — Ward 6 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 


Concord — Ward 7 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 


Cornish 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




Croydon 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Danbury 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Dublin 


1 

1 


1 

1 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 


Dunbarton 


1 


Enfield 


2 

1 
1 
2 


3 

1 

I 


3 

1 
1 
2 


2 
1 

1 


2 
1 
2 
2 


2 


Errol 


1 




2 


Franklin — Ward 1 


2 


Franklin — Ward 3 


8 


8 


8 


8 


7 


7 




1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
11 


I 
i 

1 

1 

11 


1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
11 


1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
11 


1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 


1 




1 




3 




1 




2 




1 


Hopkinton 


11 11 




5 


5 


5 


5 


5 5 


Keene — Ward 1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 2 




1 
1 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 1 


Keene — Ward 4 


1 1 


Keene — Ward 5 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 



264 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SECOND 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT.— Concluded. 



Alternate 
Delegates-at-Large. 



Alternate 

District 

Delegates. 



Lancaster 

Lebanon 

Lempster 

Lisbon 

Littleton 

Lyman 

Lyndeborougb . . 

Marlborough 

Milf ord 

Nashua — Ward 1 
Nashua — Ward 2 
Nashua — Ward 4 
Nashua — Ward 6 
Nashua — Ward 7 
Nashua — Ward 8 

New Boston 

New Ipswich . . . 
New London 
Peterborough ... 

Piermont 

Pittsburg 

Plainfield 

Plymouth 

Richmond 

Rindge 

Rumney 

Springfield 

Stewartstown ... 

Stoddard 

Sutton 

Swanzey 

Temple 

Troy 

Unity 

Walpole 

Warner 

Warren 

Weare 

Webster 

Wentworth 

Whitefield 

Wilton 

Winchester 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



265 





Delegates 


at-Large. 


j 


Delegates. 








1 


u 


d 


d 

o 






6 

> 




GO 


2 

Fh 






d 


d 


o 

X 


m 

bfi 
d 


SUMMARY. 


03 

pq 


2 


fa 


* 


t-s 


&H 


d 

PQ 


3 




Ph 




el 




fa 


6 


6 


«l 




<B 


o 


'd 


9 
"3 




-3 

d 
a 


.2 


03 




P3 


£ 


« 


pq 


fa" 


03 


fc 


t-i 
fa 




67 


65 


66 


64 


63 


60 






Strafford 


21 


22 


22 


21 


22 


23 






Belknap 


34 


34 


32 


35 


29 


29 






Carroll 


14 


15 


13 


13 


14 


13 








64 
120 


65 
119 


64 
112 


64 
107 


9 
57 


8 
56 


54 
56 


54 




59 


Cheshire 


32 


32 


32 


32 






31 


31 




14 
78 
23 


15 

78 
23 


16 

75 
23 


15 

77 
22 






13 
71 
24 


13 




72 




25 








467 


468 


455 


450 


194 


180 


249 


254 













Alternate 






Alternate 






Delegates- at-Larg 


e. 




Delegates. 






Fh 

9 






>> 








a' 

03 


SUMMARY. 


03 

fa 


o 
o 

Fh 


Fh 

M 

Fh 
03 


,0 

O 

Eh 


pi 

o 

"c3 


£ 

Fh 
Fh 
O 

Eh 


■th 

d 
o3 


J 




H 


w 


fa 


£ 


02 


M 
>> 


h1 


6 




^ 


be 


-d 

Fh 


GO 
0J 


d 


J 


d 




rQ 


Fh 
O 


* 


Fh 

03 


A 


Fh 


d 






o 


<D 




A 


Fh 










P4 


$ 


H 


o 


< 


H 


n 


i-s 




59 

22 


57 
22 


56 
22 


56 
22 


57 
19 


56 
19 






Strafford 




Belknap 


26 


26 


26 


26 


27 


27 








13 

60 


14 

59 


14 

60 


13 

60 


12 
6 


12 
6 


'58 




Merrimack 


42 




106 


107 


102 


105 


46 


46 


53 


52 




29 
13 


29 
11 


29 
13 


29 
11 






29 
9 


25 


Sullivan 


8 


G-raf ton 


61 
17 


62 
16 


62 
18 


61 

16 






61 
15 


61 


Coos 


16 


Total votes 


406 


403 


402 


399 


167 


166 


225 


204 



266 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



POSTOFFICES IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



Acworth 
Alexandria 
Alstead 

Alstead Center 
Alton 

Alton Bay- 
Amherst 
Andover 
Antrim 
Ashland 
Ashuelot 
Atkinson Depot 
Auburn 
Bank Village 
Barnstead 
Barrington 
Bartlett 
Bath 

Bear Island 
Belmont 
Bemis 

Bennetts Landing 
Bennington 
Benton 
Berlin 

Berlin Mills 
Bethlehem 
Blodget Landing 
Boscawen 
Bradford 
Breezy Point 
Brentwood 
Bretton Woods 
Bridgewater 
Bristol 
Brookline 
Burkehaven 
Campton 
Canaan 

Canaan Center 
Candia 

Canobie Lake 
Cantertrary 
Canterbury Depot 
Cascade 

Center Barnstead 
Center Conway 
Center Effingham 
Center Harbor 
Center Ossipee 
Center Sandwich 
Center Strafford 
Center Tuftonboro 
Charlestown 
Chatham 
Cheever 
Chesham 
Chester 
Chesterfield 
Chichester 
Chocorua 
Claremont 
Claremont Junction 



Clarksville 

Clintongrove 

Colebrook 

Concord 

Contoocook 

Conway 

Coos 

Cornish Flat 

Crawford House 

Croydon 

Croydon Flat 

Crystal 

Danbury 

Danville 

Deerfield 

Deerfield Center 

Deering 

Deer Park 

Derry 

Dixville 

Dorcnester 

Dover 

Drewsville 

Dublin 

Dummer 

Dunbarton 

Durham 

East Acworth 

East Alstead 

East Andover 

East Barrington 

East Candia 

East Canterbury 

East Deering 

East Derry 

East Hampstead 

East Haverhill 

East Hebron 

East Jaffrey 

East Kingston 

East Lempster 

East Madison 

Easton 

East Rindge 

East Rochester 

East Springfield 

East Sullivan 

East Swanzey 

East Wakefield 

East Washington 

East Weare 

East Westmoreland 

East Wolfeboro 

Eaton Center 

Effingham 

Effingham Falls 

Elkins 

Ellsworth 

Elmwood 

Enfield 

Enfield Center 

Epping 

Epsom 



Errol 

Etna 

Exeter 

Fabyan House 

Fairview 

Farmington 

Fitzwilliam 

Fitzwilliam Depot 

Flume House 

Francestown 

Franconia 

Franklin 

Freedom 

Fremont 

Georges Mills 

Gerrish 

Gilmanton 

Gilmanton Iron Works 

Gilsum 

Glen 

Goffstown 

Gonic 

Gorham 

Goshen 

Gossville 

Grafton 

Grafton Center 

Granite 
Grantham 

Greenfield 

Grasmere 

Greenhill 

Greenland 

Greenland Depot 

Greenville 

Groton 

Groveton 

Guild 

Hampstead 

Hampton 

Hampton Beach 

Hampton Falls 

Hancock 

Hanover 

Harrisville 

Haverhill 

Hebron 

Hedding 

Henniker 

Hill 

Hillsboro 

Hillsboro Center 

Hillsboro Lower Village 

Hillsboro Upper Village 

Hinsdale 

Holderness 

Hollis 

Hollis Depot 

Hooksett 

Hopkinton 

Horns Mills 

Hudson 

Intervale 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



267 



POSTOFFICES IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. — Continued. 



Jackson 

Jaffrey 

Jefferson 

Jefferson Highland 

Johnson 

Kearsarge 

Keene 

Kelleyville 

Kingston 

Laconia 

Lakeport 

Lakeside 

Lancaster 

Leavitts Hill 

Lebanon 

Lee 

Leightons Corners 

Lempster 

Lincoln 

Lisbon 

Little Boars Head 

Littleton 

Livermore 

Lochmere 

Londonderry 

Long Island 

Loudon 

Lyme 

Lyme Center 

Madbury 

Madison 

Manchester 

Maplewood 

Marlboro 

Marlboro Depot 

Marlow 

Mascoma 

Mason 

Mast Yard 

Meadows 

Melvin Mills 

Melvin Village 

Meredith 

Meredith Center 

Meriden 

Merrimack 

Milan 

Milford 

Mill Village 

Milton 

Milton Mills 

Mirror Lake 

Monadnock 

Monroe 

Montcalm 

Mont Vernon 

Moultonboro 

Moultonville 

Mountainview 

Mount Carrigain 

Mount Sunapee 

Mount Washington 

Munsonville 



Nashua 

Nelson 

New Boston 

Newbury 

New Castle 

New Durham 

Newfields 

New Hampton 

New Ipswich 

New London 

New Market 

Newport 

Newton 

Newton Junction 

North Barnstead 

North Charlestown 

North Chatham 

North Chichester 

North Conway 

North Danville 

North Dorchester 

North Epping 

North Groton 

North Hampton 

North Haverhill 

North Monroe 

North Newport 

North Richmond 

North Rochester 

North Salem 

North Sanbornton 

North Sandwich 

North Sutton 

Northumberland 

North Wakefield 

North Weare 

North Wolfeboro 

Northwood 

Northwood Center 

Northwood Narrows 

Northwood Ridge 

North Woodstock 

Nottingham 

Orford 

Orfordville 

Ossipee 

Ossipee Valley 

Passaconaway 

Pelham 

Pembroke 

Pequaket 

Percy 

Peterboro 

Pierce Bridge 

Piermont 

Pike 

Pittsburg 

Pittsfield 

Plainfield 

Plaistow 

Plymouth 

Ponemah 

Portsmouth 



Potter Place 

Pratts 

Profile House 

Province Lake 

Quaker City 

Quincy 

Randolph 

Raymond 

Redstone 

Reeds Ferry 

Richmond 

Rindge 

Riverdale 

Riverton 

Robys Corner 

Rochester 

Rockingham 

Rumney 

Rumney Depot 

Rye 

Rye Beach 

Rye North Beach 

Salem 

Salem Depot 

Salisbury 

Salmon Falls 

Sanbornton 

Sanbornville 

Sandown 

Sandwich 

Scott 

Seabrook 

Shelburne 

Short Falls 

Silver Lake 

Smithtown 

Smithville 

Snowville 

Somersworth 

Soo Nipi Park 

South Acworth 

South Barnstead 

South Barrington 

South Charlestown 

South Chatham 

South Danbury 

South Danville 

South Deerfield 

South Effingham 

South Lee 

South Lyndeboro 

South Merrimack 

South Newbury 

South Sutton 

South Tamworth 

South Weare 

Spofford 

Springfield 

Stark 

Starr King 

State Line 

Stinson Lake 

Stoddard 



268 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



POSTOFFICES IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. — Concluded. 



Strafford 

Stratford 

Stratham 

Sugar Hill 

Sullivan 

Sunapee 

Suncook 

Surry 

Sutton 

Swanzey 

Tamworth 

Temple 

The Weirs 

Thorntons 

Tilton 

Troy 

Tuftonboro 

Twin Mountain 

Union 

Unity 

Wakefield 

Walpole 

Warner 

Warren 

Warren Summit 

Washington 

Waterloo 



Ferry 



Water Village 
Waterville 
Weare 
Wendell 
Wentworth 
Wentworths Location 
West Alton 
West Andover 
West Barrington 
West Campton 
West Canaan 
West Chesterfield 
West Claremont 
West Epping 
West Hampstead 
West Henniker 
West Hopkinton 
West Lebanon 
West Milan 
Westmoreland 
Westmoreland Depot 
West Nottingham 
West Ossipee 
West Peterboro 
Westport 
West Rindge 
West Rumney 



West Rye 

West Salisbury 

West Springfield 

West Stewartstown 

West Swanzey 

West Thornton 

Westville 

West Windham 

Whiteface 

Whitefield 

Whittier 

Wilmot 

Wilmot Flat 

Wilton 

Winchester 

Windham Depot 

Winnipesaukee 

Winnisquam 

Winona 

Wolfeboro 

Wolfeboro Center 

Wolfeboro Falls 

Wonalancet 

Woodman 

Woodstock 

Woodsville 



FEDERAL COURT ORGANIZATION. 

Circuit Court, first circuit judges (name, residence and date 
of appointment) : 

William L. Putnam, Portland, Me 1892 

Frederic Dodge, Boston, Mass 1913 

George H. Bingham, Manchester 1913 

District Court, district of New Hampshire (name of official, 
residence and date of appointment) : 

Judge, Edgar Aldrich, Littleton 1891 

Clerk, Burns P. Hodgman, Concord 1900 

Attorney, Fred H. Brown, Somersworth 1914 

Attorney's Clerk, Dora M. Leonard, Concord 1914 

Marshal, Charles J. O'Neil, Walpole 1914 

Deputy Marshals, William Murchie, Concord 1915 

Annie M. Greaney, Manchester 1915 

Commissioners, John G. Crawford, Manchester 1913 

Albert R. Hatch, Portsmouth 1913 

Burns P. Hodgman, Concord 1912 

Merrill Shurtleff, Lancaster 1913 

The above court meets at Portsmouth the first Tuesday in 
October; in Concord, the last Tuesday in April and the second 
Tuesday in December; in Littleton, the third Tuesday in Sep- 
tember. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 269 



REPUBLICAN PLATFORM OF 1916. 

The Republicans of New Hampshire present to their fellow-citizens a 
state redeemed, from Democratic control, and point to the complete ful- 
fillment of the pledges upon which the successful campaign of 1914 was 
waged. 

We have reduced the state tax. 

We have reduced the state debt. 

We have kept expenditures within the revenues. 

We have paid nearly half a million dollars in Democratic liabilities. 

We have met the state's portion of the cost of a needless mobilization 
of the National Guard forced upon us by a Democratic administration at 
Washington. 

We have maintained every public enterprise in a condition of efficiency. 

We have provided for the completion of a state-wide system of highways. 

We have extended the school system and provided for a larger co- 
operation between the state and local school authorities. 

We have provided pensions for teachers of long and meritorious service. 

We have made adequate provision for state institutions. 

We have created a real and economical system for the purchase of pub- 
lic supplies. 

We have established a system of municipal courts which is geographi- 
cally correct, free from partisanship and thoroughly efficient. 

We have set a statutory bar to the practice of appointing members of 
the executive council to office. 

We have placed upon the statute books a model law for the supervision 
of the banks of the state. 

We have purged the public service of incompetency and favoritism. 

We have defended the integrity of the state's system of railroads. 

We have extended and perfected the mother's pension law. 

We have made ample appropriations for the care of the delinquent, the 
dependent and the defective. , 

We have enacted effective legislation to limit the use of money in po- 
litical campaigns. 

We have made a helpful beginning in the work of agricultural co- 
operation. 

We have omitted no feasible act for the advancement of the moral or 
material interests of the state. 

These splendid results have been achieved through the cordial co-opera- 
tion of the Republican elements, whose division in 1912 brought about a 
temporary Democratic ascendancy in New Hampshire. Republican reunion 
is now complete, and we are assured of continued control of the state gov- 
ernment. 

Party Pledges. 

We therefore pledge ourselves to develop and to perfect the program of 
progressive legislation which was initiated by Republican leaders and to 
which the Republican party has given constant support. 



270 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



We present our candidates for governor, members of congress and other 
positions with full confidence in their ability, integrity and thorough re- 
publicanism, and we pledge them our hearty support, in full confidence 
of their election. 

The next legislature will be Republican, and it will enact laws : 

To produce a more equitable distribution of the cost of industrial ac- 
cidents. 

To establish a suitable system of factory inspection. 

To extend the assistance of the state to agricultural industry. 

The Republican legislature of 1915 provided for the calling of a consti- 
tutional convention. We pledge the Republican membership in that body 
to submit to the people amendments to our organic law which will make 
our system of taxation more scientific and equitable and which will permit 
the electorate to pass upon all questions of constitutional importance. 

We reaffirm the historic policies of the Republican party in national 
affairs and we especially emphasize our adherence to a protective tariff, 
which is the surest means to guarantee stable and profitable employment 
to American labor and which will be the safest defense to our industries 
at the end of the era of spurious prosperity caused by the European war, 
whose horrors are being capitalized by an unscrupulous administration for 
personal political benefit. 

We endorse the declarations of the Republican national platform of 
1916, and we commend the attitude of our candidate for the presidency 
upon all the issues involved in the campaign. 

We congratulate the country upon the nomination and the assured 
election of Hughes and Fairbanks; and we pledge to them the electoral 
vote of this state. 

DEMOCRATIC PLATFORM OF 1916. 

We, the Democrats of New Hampshire, in convention assembled, do 
hereby adopt the following platform: 

In the Nation. 

We heartily endorse the platform of the democracy adopted at St. 
Louis, and we pledge our united and earnest support to the great leaders 
chosen in national convention there. No president in our time has had 
to solve so many difficult and serious problems, both of foreign and do- 
mestic policy. These problems have been met with courage, wisdom and 
efficiency. The record of achievements in sound progressive legislation 
commands the approval of all independent citizens. The Democratic party 
has made an honest downward revision of the tariff and created a permanent 
nonpartisan tariff commission. It has created a national currency system 
that will make impossible hereafter financial panics and is controlled by 
the public for the welfare of all. It has improved the anti-trust laws and 
provided a better method for their enforcement by the passage of the Clay- 
ton anti-trust act and the federal trade commission act. It has passed 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 271 

an income tax and a federal inheritance tax for the more equal distribu- 
tion of the burden of taxation. For the benefit of farming, it has enacted 
the Smith-Lever extension act, the good roads bill, the rural credits act, 
the grain grading bill and the law against speculation in cotton futures. 
It has limited the use of injunctions in labor disputes, declared that the 
Sherman act does not apply to labor unions, or farmers' co-operative asso- 
ciations, passed the LaFollette-Seaman's bill, the workmen's compensation 
act, the federal child labor bill, and established an eight-hour day for all 
government employees. It has made ample provision for military prepar- 
edness on sea and land. 

We heartily endorse the action of President Wilson and congress in 
averting a railroad strike by the passage of the Adamson act. 

The administration has dealt with foreign problems with true American 
spirit and has settled these controversies by the methods of peace rather 
than by war and bloodshed. 

In our candidates for congress, Gordon Woodbury and Raymond B. 
Stevens, we have men who are in every way worthy to uphold the policies 
of our President, and to them we pledge our unqualified support. 

In the State. 

We favor the calling of a constitutional convention and the adoption 
of the following amendments : 

The abolition of the governor's council. 

An increase in the membership of the senate, the representation to be 
based upon population and not upon wealth, as now. 

Giving the legislature the power to classify different kinds of property 
for purposes of taxation. 

The initiative and referendum. 

Giving the governor the power to veto separate items in appropri- 
ation bills. 

We are in favor of a factory inspection law, a 54-hour law, and an eight- 
hour day in continuous 24-hour industries. 

We are in favor of sustaining and improving the present employer's 
liability and workmen's compensation act. 

We favor the submission to the people of a constitutional amendment 
granting equal suffrage. 

The Democratic party believes that farming is not only the basis of 
all prosperity but fundamental to all life. In accordance with that belief, 
we point with pride to its historic establishment of federal farm experi- 
ment stations in every state of the union under President Cleveland and 
to the establishment by the present Democratic congress and President of 
the following two great farm laws : 

The Smith-Lever law that makes for the extension of farm knowledge 
and practice to the farms and homes in every state. 

The Hollis farm loan law, to facilitate long and short term loans under 
co-operative provisions of intelligent supervision by the government. 



272 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

We believe that the tested knowledge gained at experiment stations at 
state colleges and brought to farms and homes as increased power and 
production is the highest measure of protection to the grower and con- 
sumer. 

We believe that in easier and ampler money means for farm purchases, 
farm equipment and crop movement lies the greatest increase of protective 
production. 

We confidently look forward to the establishment of co-operative farm 
bureaus of direction and distribution that shall give the farming producer 
a waiting market for his produce and a full dollar for its sale, and to the 
consumer fresh goods and first-hand prices. 

Our state college has done much for the boys and girls of New Hamp- 
shire, and we pledge it our unqualified support. 

We favor increased efficiency in our schools and we pledge ourselves to 
give the cause of education generous support. 

Good roads are an asset to the state and we favor liberal appropriations 
for their construction, maintenance and improvement. 

We believe in genuine local option. 

We believe in amending the primary law so as to carry out the pur- 
pose for which it was intended, in order that there may be a reduction of 
the expenses attending the primary election, and for the use of such a ballot 
as will accomplish the purpose of the law without any voter being com- 
pelled to declare his party affiliation. 

We believe if there is any reorganization of the railroad systems of 
this state that the interests of the people of the state of New Hampshire 
should be first considered and protected. 

To our able candidate for governor, Hon. John C. Hutchins, and to 
the excellent state ticket nominated by the Democratic party, we pledge 
our united support. 

REPUBLICAN STATE COMMITTEE. 

Chairman, Philip H. Faulkner of Keene; Secretary, Oscar 
F. Moreau of Manchester; Treasurer, William F. Thayer of 
Concord; Executive Committee, Albert S. Wetherell of Exe- 
ter, John L. Meader of Rochester, Elmer S. Tilton of Laconia, 
James E. French of Moultonborough, Arthur P. Morrill of 
Concord, John J. Donahue of Manchester, William B. Rotch 
of Milford, Orville E. Cain of Keene, John H. Glynn of New- 
port, Fred A. Jones of Lebanon, Joseph A. Vaillancourt of 
Berlin. 

Rockingham County— Albert S. Wetherell, Rufus N. Elwell, Exeter; 
Frank H. Durgin, Newmarket ; Warren Brown, Hampton Falls ; John S. Cor- 
son, Hampstead; Charles I. Pressey, Atkinson; John H. Bartlett, Ernest 
L. Guptill, Sherman T. Newton, Portsmouth; Frederick J. Shepard, Derry; 
Rosecrans W. Pillsbury, Londonderry; George L. Chase, Newfields; Irving 
Dow, Northwood; Stephen A. Frost, Fremont; W. Dubois Pulver, Salem. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 273 



Strafford County— D wight Hall, Thomas H. Dearborn, John T. Welch, 
H. K. Reynolds, Dover; Jeremiah Langley, Durham; Alonzo I. Nute, Farm- 
ington; Malcom A. H. Hart, Milton; Joel W. McCrillis, R. DeWitt Burn- 
ham, John L. Meader, Alcide Bilodeau, Rochester; John Q. A. Wentworth, 
Rollinsford; Sidney B. Stevens, James H. Joyce, John N. Haines, Somers- 
worth; William S. Davis, Barrington; William H. Knox, Madbury. 

Carroll County— James E. French, Moultonborough; Sewall W. Abbott, 
Wolfeboro; Charles W. Gray, Jackson; Frank S. Lord, Ossipee; A. Crosby 
Kennett, Conway; Fred E. Bryer, Sandwich. 

Belknap County— Henry B. Quinby, Elmer S. Tilton, Oscar L. Young, 
Laconia; Joseph F. Smith, Meredith; Ellsworth H. Rollins, Alton; George 
R. Hammel, Belmont; Arthur T. Cass, Tilton; Robert M. Wright, San- 
bornton. 

Merrimack County— George H. Moses, Frank S. Streeter, Arthur E. Dole, 
Arthur F. Morrill, Benjamin W. Couch, Frank P. Quimby, Arthur H. 
Britton, Concord; George E. Clark, Ralph B. Griffin, Franklin; Arthur J. 
Boutwell, Hopkinton; George E. Miller, Pembroke; Fred H. Blanchard, 
Concord; William H. Head, Hooksett ; Jeremiah E. Smith, Northfield ; New- 
man Durrell, Herbert W. Dustin, Pittsfield ; Edward H. Carroll, Warner; 
James L. Colby, Webster; Harry L. Holmes, Henniker; Jean M. Shaw, 
Hill. 

Hillsborough County— Samuel J. Lord, Charles A. Perkins, Frank L. 
Downs, David W. Perkins, William B. McKay, Adolph Wagner, William 
Marcotte, John J. Donahue, George N. Manning, Arthur T. Beaumier, 
Aime E. Boisvert, Reinhardt Hecker, J. A. Lacasse, Manchester; William 
B. Rotch, Milford; Frank A. Parker, Goffstown; Timothy E. Driscoll, 
Peterborough; John Wentworth, Hudson; William J. Patterson, New Bos- 
ton; Willis C. Hardy, Hollis ; J. Elro Perkins, Antrim; William D. Swart, 
Robert A. French, Fred W. Estabrook, Frank W. Maynard, John H. Field, 
John R. Spring, Edward Labine, Edward H. Wason, Marcel Theriault, 
Nashua; George W. Haslet, Hillsborough. 

Cheshire County— Orville E. Cain, Philip H. Faulkner, William S. Tut- 
tle, W. H. Watson, H. E. Swan, Keene; W. W. Howe, Marlow; William 
J. King, Walpole; George B. Leighton, Dublin; Charles W. Fletcher, 
Rindge; William G. Booth, Hinsdale. 

Sullivan County— George W. Buss, Acworth; Fred A. Barton, Lempster; 
Fred H. Perry, Charlestown ; Carl B. Philbrick, Springfield ; Daniel West- 
gate, Plainfield; William F. Galucia, Sunapee; John H. Glynn, Newport; 
William E. Kinney, Claremont; Guy Dole, Cornish. 

Grafton County— Alvin F. Wentworth, Plymouth; Ora A. Brown, Ash- 
land; H. Eugene Morrison, Orford ; Moody C. Dole, Campton; Fred A. 
Jones, Lebanon; William E. Lawrence, Haverhill; James B. Wallace, 
Canaan; Perley R. Bugbee, Hanover; J. G. M. Glessner, Bethlehem; Fred 
W. Parker, Lisbon; Charles E. Gosselin, Littleton; Henry C. Field, Bris- 
tol; George W. Barnes, Lyme; A. M. Spaulding, Rumney; George H. 
Turner, Bethlehem ; Harold A. Webster, Holderness. 

Coos County— George F. Rich, Joseph A. Vaillancourt, Berlin; William 
S. McConnell, Thomas F. Johnson, Colebrook ; Leon D. Ripley, Stewartstown ; 



274 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Bernard W. Fisher, Stratford; Edward M. Bowker, Whitefield; Bernard 
Jacobs, Lancaster; Henry Marble, Gorham; Joseph P. Boucher, Northumber- 
land. 

DEMOCRATIC STATE COMMITTEE. 

Chairman, George E. Farrand of Concord; Secretary, Rob- 
ert C. Murchie of Concord; Treasurer, Charles E. Tilton of 
Tilton; Executive Committee, M. B. Griffin of Newmarket, 
Fred H. Brown of Somersworth, A. H. Harriman of Laconia, 
Herbert S. Rogers of Wakefield, Henry F. Hollis of Concord, 
James F. Brennan of Peterboro, Joseph P. Chatel of Man- 
chester, Guy H. Cutter of Jaffrey, John McCrillis of Newport, 
Frank J. Beal of Plymouth, John H. Hinman of North Strat- 
ford, Gordon Woodbury of Bedford, John C. Hutchins of 
Stratford, Raymond B. Stevens of Landaff. 

Rockingham County— Joseph N. Bartlett, Northwood ; William Brown, 
Raymond; Myron Richardson, Derry; L. Wallace Hall, Salem; David O. 
Brewer, Kingston; William D. Ingalls, East Kingston; Melzar W. Dunbar, 
Hampton; Patrick J. Kennedy, Exeter; Calvin Page, Samuel T. Ladd, Dan- 
iel W. Badger, Portsmouth; Winthrop B. Hoyt, Greenland; Louis P. Ladd, 
Epping; Michael B. Griffin, Newmarket. 

Strafford County— Walter H. Smith, Barrington; Scott W. Caswell, John 
H. Wesley, Dover; Joseph Warren, Edgar J. Ham, Rochester; James 
H. Foss, Strafford; Fred H. Brown, Somersworth; James D. Pinkham, 
Milton. 

Carroll County— John B. Nash, Conway; William Pitman, Bartlett; 
James O. Gerry, Madison; Frank A. Bryer, Sandwich; Arthur P. Mer- 
row, Freedom; Dana J. Brown, Ossipee ; Herbert S. Rogers, Wakefield; 
Frank P. Hobbs, Wolfeboro. 

Belknap County— Herbert J. Jones, Alton; William H. Moses, Tilton; 
C. Orrin Downing, Laconia ; William H. Neal, Meredith ; Louis J. Truland, 
Laconia. 

Merrimack County— George W. Stone, Andover; Alfred B. Stimson, New 
London; George M. Putnam, Contoocook; Charles P. Shepard, Boscawen; 
Charles P. Herrick, Northfield ; Walter H. Tripp, Epsom; Charles B. 
Rogers, Pembroke; Henry F. Hollis, David E. Murphy, David D. Taylor, 
Edward J. Hatch, George E. Farrand, Concord; Seth W. Jones, Harry W. 
Daniel, Franklin. 

Hillsborough County— Daniel G. B. Burns, Pelham; William H. Wood- 
bury, Goffstown; Alva A. Simonds, Milford; Henry P. Gainey, Green- 
ville ; James F. Brennan, Peterborough ; George C. Tolford, Wilton ; John 
B. Jameson, Antrim; Charles S. Perry, Hillsborough; Fred C. Jones, 
Weare ; Roscoe F. Proctor, Jeremiah J. Doyle, Henri T. Ledoux, Charles 
F. Runnells, Nashua; John W. Center, William J. Starr, James A. Brod- 
erick, Edward J. Flannagan, John J. McGovern, John J. Connor, Benjamin 
J. Mack, Joseph P. Chatel, Cyprien J. Belanger, John W. S. Joyal, Man- 
chester. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



275 



Cheshire County— Fred J. Marvin, Alstead; H. R. Greene, Nelson; 
Patrick E. Griffin, Walpole ; George H. Duncan, Jaffrey; Edward P. 
Qualters, Winchester; Thomas J. Winn, Harrisville; Richard J. Wolfe, 
John J. Donovan, Keene. 

Sullivan County— Frank Whitaker, Plainfield ; Orin C. Young, Charles- 
town; Perley Walker, Grantham; Charles A. Newton, Unity; Delfred R. 
Graves, Newport; Maurice M. Freeman, Claremont. 

Grafton County — Horace G. Robie, Canaan; Frank J. Beal, Plymouth; 
John Byrne, Lebanon; Roland A. Lewin, Hanover; George W. Pike, Lis- 
bon ; James J. Harrington, Littleton ; Sidney F. Downing, Lincoln ; John 
G. Marston, Woodsville ; Herbert H. Follansbee, Bristol; William R. 
Davis, Wentworth. 

Coos County— Walter S. Drew, Colebrook ; John H. Hinman, Stratford ; 
Fred S. Cleaveland, Lancaster; Alonzo D. Barrett, Gorham ; Frank Han- 
cock, Milan; George Paine, Leo Parent, John Sheridan, Daniel J. Daley, 
Berlin. 

SOCIALIST ORGANIZATION. 

Chairman, Earle B. Young of Laconia; Executive Commit- 
tee, Francis T. Butler of Franklin, Peter Henry of Berlin, 
Andrew Linna of Milford, Patrick J. Leonard of Concord. 

REPUBLICAN CHAIRMEN. 

(Note — The present Republican party was organized in New 
Hampshire in 1856, and it is probable that during the first 
two years the chairman acted as treasurer also. The list of 
chairmen for the past sixty years is as follows:) 



Name of Chairman. 


Residence. 


Te 


Edward H. Rollins, 


Concord, 


1856-62, 


Anthony Colby, 


New London, 


1862-63 


Nehemiah G. Ordway, 


'Concord, 


1863-64 


William E. Chandler, 


Concord, 


1864-66 


Austin F. Pike, 


Franklin, 


1866-68 


Orrin C. Moore, 


Nashua, 


1872-74 


Daniel Hall, 


Dover, 


1874-77 


Elijah M. Topliff, 


Manchester, 


1877-78 


Henry H. Huse, 


Manchester, 


1878-82 


Jacob H. Gallinger, 


Concord, 


1882-90 


Frank C. Churchill, 


Lebanon, 


1890-92 


Stephen S. Jewett, 


Laconia, 


1892-96 


John A. Spaulding, 


Nashua, 


1896-98 


Oscar L. Young, 


Laconia, 


1908-10 


Edmund Cook, 


Concord, 


1910-12 


Jesse M. Barton, 


Newport, 


1912-14 


Dwight Hall, 


Dover, 


1914-16 


Philip H. Faulkner, 


Keene, 


1916- 



68-72 



-1908 



276 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



REPUBLICAN SECRETARIES. 



Name of Secretary. 

Sylvester Dana, 
William E. Chandler, 
Benjamin F. Prescott, 
Benjamin G-errish, Jr., 
Wyman Pattee, 
Charles H. Roberts, 
George E. Jenks, 
Frank D. Currier, 
Stephen S. Jewett, 
William Tutherly, 
James 0. Lyford, 
Louis G. Hoyt, 
Thomas F. Clifford, 
L. Ashton Thorp, 
Harry J. Brown, 
Frank A. Musgrove, 
Philip H. Faulkner, 
John G. M. Glessner* 
Oscar F. Moreau, 



Residence. 


Term. 


Concord, 


1856-58 


Concord, 


1858-60 


Epping, 


1860-67, 71-77 


Concord, 


1867-69 


Enfield, 


1869-70 


Concord, 


1870-71 


Concord, 


1877-82 


Canaan, 


1882-90 


Laconia, 


1890-92 


Concord, 


1892-96 


Concord, 


1896-98 


Kingston, 


1898-1900 


Franklin, 


1900-06 


Manchester, 


1906-08 


Concord, 


1908-10 


Hanover, 


1910-12 


Keene, 


1912-14 


Bethlehem, 


1914-16 


Manchester, 


1916- 



*Acting Secretary. 



REPUBLICAN TREASURERS. 



Name of Treasurer. 



Frederick Smyth, 
Thomas L. Tullock, 
John Kimball, 
Asa Fowler, 
Carlos G. Pressey, 
Charles H. Roberts, 
Edgar H. Woodman, 
William F. Thayer, 



DEMOCRATIC 



Residence. 


Te 


Manchester, 


1858-59 


Portsmouth, 


1859-65 


Concord, 


1865-72, 


Concord, 


1872 


Concord, 


1873-74 


Concord, 


1874-75 


Concord, 


1890-92 


Concord, 


1892- 


! CHAIRMEN. 





75-90 



(Note — The List of Democratic officials is not complete for 
the past sixty years, but so far as is known they are as fol- 
lows:) 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



277 



Name of Chairman. 

Francis B. Peabody, 
John H. George, 
John M. Hill, 
Joseph Robinson, 
Josiah Minot, 
Aaron P. Hughes, 
Lewis W. Clark, 
Anson S. Marshall, 
Samuel B. Page, 
John G. Sinclair, 
George F. Putnum, 
Isaac N. Blodgett, 
Charles F. Stone, 
John P. Bartlett, 
John T. Amey, 
Henry F. Hollis, 
Nathaniel E. Martin, 
Thomas H. Madigan, Jr., 
John B. Jameson, 
George E. Farrand, 



Residence. 


Term. 


Concord, 


1856 


Concord, 


1856-58 


Concord, 


1858-59, 66-68 


Concord, 


1859-60 


Concord, 


1860-62, 63-64 


Nashua, 


1862-63 


Manchester, 


1864-66, 71-72 


Concord, 


1868-69 


Haverhill, 


1869-71 


Littleton, 


1872-73 


Haverhill, 


1873-76, 78-82 


Franklin, 


1876-78 


Laconia, 


1882-90 


Manchester, 


1890-94 


Lancaster, 


1894-1902 


Concord, 


1902 


Concord, 


1902-04 


Concord, 


1904-08 


Concord, 


1908-14 


Concord, 


1914- 



DEMOCRATIC SECRETARIES. 



Name of Secretary. 

Lewis W. Clark, 
John M. Hill, 
Henry H. Metcalf, 
William M. Thayer, 
Henry H. Huse, 
Charles B. Griswold, 
Charles H. Smith, 
William Butterfield, 
Herbert F. Norris, 
Isaac N. Andrews, 
Nathaniel E. Martin, 
Frank M. Rollins, 
James R. Jackson, 
Daniel M. White, 
Henry W. George, 
Thomas H. Madigan, Jr., 
John P. Bartlett, 
John B. Jameson, 
Guy H. Cutter, 
Robert C. Murchle, 



Residence. 


Term 


Manchester, 


1858-60 


Concord, 


1860-69 


Concord, 


1869-71 


Portsmouth, 


1871-72 


Manchester, 


1872-73 


Lebanon, 


1873-75 


Newmarket, 


1875-76 


Concord, 


1876-78 


Epping, 


1878, 80-84 


Nashua, 


1878-80 


Concord, 


1884-88 


Laconia, 


1888-90 


Littleton, 


1890-94 


Peterborough, 


1894-98 


Barnstead, 


1898-1900 


Concord, 


1900-04 


Manchester, 


1904-06 


Concord, 


1906-08 


Jaffrey, 


1908-12 


Concord, 


1914- 



278 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



DEMOCRATIC TREASURERS. 



Name of Treasurer. 



John M. Hill, 
Howard F. Hill, 
Eliphalet S. Nutter, 
John M. Mitchell, 
William J. Ahern, 
John P. Goggin, 
Franklin P. Kellom, 
William C. Yeaton, 
Clarence E. Carr, 
William H. Barry, 
Charles E. Tilton, 



Residence. 


Ten 


Concord, 


1876-94 


Concord, 


1894-96 


Concord, 


1896-98 


Concord, 


1898-1900 


Concord, 


1900-02 


Nashua, 


1902-04 


Winchester, 


1904-06 


Concord, 


1906-12 


Andover, 


1912-14 


Nashua, 


1914-16 


Tilton, 


1916- 



STATE PRIMARY, 1916. 



The following are tables of returns of the state primary 
held September 5, 1916. There were no candidates in the 
Progressive party. In towns where no votes were cast no 
record is made of the returns. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



279 



ROCKINGHAM 
COUNTY. 



Atkinson 

Auburn 

Brentwood 

Candia 

Chester 

Danville 

Deerfield 

Derry 

East Kingston . 

Epping 

Exeter 

Fremont 

Greenland 

Hampstead .... 

Hampton 

Hampton Falls 

Kensington 

Kingston 

Londonderry . . 

Newcastle 

Newfields 

Newington 

Newmarket 

Newton 

North Hampton 

Northwood 

Nottingham 

Plaistow 

Portsmouth — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Raymond 

Rye 

Salem 

Sandown 

Seahrook 

South Hampton 

Stratham 

Windham 

Totals 



For Governor. 



tx 



18 
21 
34 
41 
32 
32 
41 
85 

8 

28 
198 
14 
37 
42 
25 
26 

7 
15 
28 

5 
13 

3 
42 
21 
19 
31 
36 
16 

72 

170 

10 

43 

46 

18 

2 

37 

12 

23 

3 

11 

13 



1,378 



5 >> 

r£3 fa 
CO fa 



CM 



6 

27 
20 
59 
34 
47 
30 

340 

8 

11 

250 
30 
35 
35 

110 
53 
11 
22 

219 

1 

26 

"37 
16 
10 
11 
36 
27 

34 

104 

28 

30 

25 

14 

19 

133 

7 

80 

8 

16 

30 



2,039 



n 

. ® 
fa g 



195 



For Congressman. 



03 - 



13 
15 

28 
22 
10 
14 
175 
6 

n; 

166 

10 

15 

19 

25 

18 

2 

It 

95 

2 

11 

2 

9 

18 

4 

5 

13 

18 






fa a 

o o> 



961 



13 
11 
5 
10 
45 

"4 

111 

3 

1 
8 

24 

11 

3 

1 

21 

2 
2 

*26 

2 
2 
7 






2 & 
o 



467 



11 
32 
33 
59 
31 
70 
48 

167 
11 
17 

181 
33 
63 
50 
97 
56 
16 
25 

106 
2 
25 
2 
42 
15 
23 
32 
46 
40 

87 

176 

25 

61 

48 

14 

15 

91 

10 

103 

8 

10 

31 

2.012 



I* 

a r 



24 
6 
2 
7 
9 
3 
5 

25 

18 

10 
7 
5 

53 
5 

10 
8 

13 
4 

13 

37 

40 

10 

5 

37 

9 

10 

5 

17 

1 

3 

5 

653 



280 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 







For Governor. 




For Congressman. 


STRAFFORD 




£> to 


CO . 


bo 
.d 


- to 


O 4) 


CO ft; 


£ 


COUNTY. 




Ph d 
o 


dt3 

•a h 

MS 
m 


d u 

* s 

** 

£P4 


to ■*? 

<r> CO 

gel 


to * 
W d 

ec 


5 60 

o © 
cc d 

CO 


1* 

fd o 

0«(H 




< &A 


OS 




h d 


eg - 

ad 


ho ^ 


p & 


d - 




d ST 


W 4> 


1-5 


o 0) 

3 fi 


e* 


o « 


ft ® 


ofl 


Barrington 


68 


77 


24 


5 


83 


10 


69 


25 


Dover — 
Ward 1 


172 


153 


9 


10 


137 


43 


149 


15 




79 
167 


174 

88 


13 

8 


18 
8 


69 
68 


47 
28 


123 
164 


32 


Ward 3 


17 




138 
3 


152 

2 


13 

70 


17 
53 


100 


34 


174 
5 


31 


Ward 5 


92 


Durham 


30 


39 


8 




18 


io 


43 


7 


Farmington 


132 


128 


10 


3 


24 


21 


219 


11 




10 
13 


12 
22 


17 
9 


3 
2 


16 
9 


1 
9 


6 
11 


20 


Mad bury 


11 




8 
61 
11 


4 
80 

2 


4 
9 
5 


5 
2 
5 


1 
18 
4 


'ii 


10 

111 

8 


11 




8 


New Durham 


9 


Rochester — 


















Ward 1 


58 
51 


72 
29 


17 

8 


3 

14 


37 
26 


11 

6 


79 
43 


18 


Ward 2 


23 


Ward 3 


17 


85 


4 


4 


21 


8 


69 


8 


Ward 4 


33 


42 


19 


27 


20 


19 


37 


36 


Ward 5 


50 


50 


6 


1 


23 


8 


70 


7 


Ward 6 


71 


64 


10 


2 


55 


13 


70 


11 




13 


22 


44 


17 


12 


3 


20 


54 


Somersworth — 




Ward 1 


23 


33 


34 


1 


26 


5 


27 


35 


Ward 2 


15 


40 


63 


5 


14 


4 


37 


60 


Ward 3 


4 


32 


22 


13 


8 


5 


24 


38 


Ward 4 


1 


9 


91 


21 


1 


5 


3 


111 


Ward 5 


3 


6 


38 


11 


3 


2 


4 


51 


Strafford 


25 


51 


7 


3 


13 


1 


64 


10 


Totals 


1,256 


1,468 


562 


253 


806 


304 


1,639 


751 







NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



281 







For Governor. 




For Congressman. 


BELKNAP 
COUNTY. 


to . 

M h 

> > 

>> r 


eg t* 

JT" 

Ph c 
o 

£g 

CQ 

o p. 


t>«4H 

"S"o3 

b . 

si 

1° 


u 

© o 

8| 

^£ 


CO CO 

CD CO 

* 2 

g oS 

03 - 

Sd 
<t> 


<S 

We 
® 

cvQd 


03 0) 

O cv 

Id « 

CQ P 
c6 

H 


tJ O 

S3 
H 


Alton 

Barnstead 


13 
16 
25 
21 
25 
34 

34 
44 
53 
68 
60 
98 
23 
15 
29 
38 


25 
26 
24 
1 
13 
34 

15 
63 
20 
51 
58 
53 
38 
11 
18 
34 


9 
5 
8 
8 
5 
9 

21 
, 12 
6 
12 
11 
14 


6 

14 

4 

2 

... 

"2 

17 
4 
5 
4 


4 

8 
13 

6 
12 

12 

12 
34 
21 
36 
52 
30 
23 
3 

16 
30 


1 

6 
3 

4 
8 
8 

20 

5 
10 

7 
23 

8 
13 

7 

3 


33 

28 
36 
10 
21 
21 

32 
50 
44 
69 
58 
97 
29 
12 
23 
37 


15 
22 
13 


Center Harbor 

Gilford 


8 
7 
11 


Laconia — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 


26 

26 

9 


Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 


16 
17 
13 




24 Q 


31 

2 

10 

33 


New Hampton 

Sanbornton 

Tilton 


5 

7 

30 


"3 

8 


Totals 


596 


484 


186 




126 


600 










259 



282 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



CARROLL 
COUNTY. 



Albany 

Bartlett 

Brookfield 

Chatham 

Conway , 

Eaton 

Effingham 

Freedom 

Hart's Location 

Jackson 

Madison 

Monltonborough 

Ossipee 

Sandwich 

Tamworth , 

Tuftonboro 

Wakefield 

Wolfeboro 



For Governor. 



£w 



3 

6 

41 

7 

5 

24 

2 

4 

7 

180 

45 

33 

55 

17 

30 

87 






XT 



Totals 



558 



264 



IS G3 

02 
Q - 
dS 



rd 

, pi 

II 



For Congressman. 



d ® 

31 

w 

eg » 



M d 



£TP< 

O 4> 



49 



142 



90 



in d 






I* 

X) O 
CO 



OQ 



2 


3 


6 


21 


4 


3 


5 


8 


56 


30 


12 


12 


10 


5 


24 


28 


2 


2 


12 


10 


10 


3 


175 


8 


71 


20 


25 


16 


56 


13 


18 


13 


42 


22 


62 


12 


592 


229 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



283 







For Governor. 








2 £ 










rO U 








CO 










>>& 




Cxi 


So 


MERRIMACK 


£•3 


o 


o«S 


H 


COUNTY. 


£w 


h3 








02 


o . 










fi £ 


CD S 




&* 


or* 


1° 


<1 W 




12 
18 


13 

7 


5 
15 


7 


Andover 


4 


Boscawen 


17 


11 


7 


2 




32 
17 


20 
8 


8 
20 




Bradford 


5 




19 


17 


20 


6 


Chichester 


8 


36 


15 


5 


(Joncord — Ward 1 


48 


26 


37 


42 


Concord — Ward 2 


14 


7 


13 


8 


Concord — Ward 3 


56 


29 


14 


19 


Concord — Ward 4 


160 


77 


50 


38 


Concord — Ward 5 


168 


38 


35 


9 


Concord — Ward 6 


154 


56 


49 


26 


Concord — Ward 7 


189 


75 


12 


15 




19 
17 
23 


11 
19 
25 


27 
28 
16 


14 




26 


Danbury 


3 




17 
48 


5 
14 


5 
18 




Epsom 


4 


Franklin — Ward 1 


32 


84 


4 


6 


Franklin — Ward 2 


35 


25 


36 


19 


Franklin — Ward 3 


74 


110 


41 


11 


Henniker 


33 


6 


10 


2 


Hill 


, 24 
20 
46 


11 

28 
19 


3 

6 
18 


2 


Hooksett 


3 




7 
4 




42 
8 


2 i 


13 

15 


Newbury 


26 


New London 


16 

27 


14 
8 


16 
9 


3 

2 


Northfield 


Pembroke 


34 
102 


21 
65 


19 
55 


5 


Pittsfield 


4 


Salisbury 


13 


14 


26 


9 




5 
68 
13 

12 


14 
18 
11 
11 


5 
9 
8 
9 


6 

2 


Warner 


W e bster 


7 


Wilmot 


2 






Totals 


1,640 


985 


696 


353 



284 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





For Congressman. 


MERRIMACK 


© M 

S3 © 

SA 

CS © 


tS . 

o u 
'© "S 






pT 

o 
§ . 


© . 


00 

pi 
© 
> 
© . 


COUNTY. 


iS«S 

M © 

W PI 


S-8 

CO a 






U O 


03 




O =3 

s 

00 


. =3 

© . 
60 • 

M ft 


«j2 


pi - 
° d 

£ 0} 


u - 

P 03 


Id 

03 © 


r 






©(V> 




on 

Ct3 H 




S" 




Allenstown 


13 


2 


8 


12 








Andover 










24 
24 
49 
24 


2 
3 

2 
2 


18 
6 
6 


Boscawen 










Bradford 


24 




12 


4 


18 


20 








Chichester 


11 




32 


21 








Concord — 


























69 
20 
73 


27 
4 
8 


54 


Ward 2 






15 


Ward 3 


26 


Ward 4 








'•• 




214 

193 

199 

244 

25 

30 

45 


31 
15 
28 
20 
22 
36 
11 


54 




29 


Ward 6 


49 


Ward 7 


9 


Ward 8 


21 


Ward 9 


23 


Danbury 


9 














23 








24 


2 


37 


23 








Franklin — 
















Ward 1 










103 
59 

161 
36 


2 

24 
8 
2 


7 


Ward 2 


28 


Ward 3 


43 


Henniker 


9 


Hill 


'l3 


'l2 


'26 


"8 


32 

*64 


2 
"2 


3 








23 




21 


3 


43 


16 


'l5 


17 




Newbury 


21 


New London 










28 




18 


Northfield 


18 


3 


19 


9 








Pembroke 


16 


8 


30 


23 








Pittsfield 


31 


30 


125 


53 


*25 


"7 






28 














20 
86 
21 


"3 
3 


10 




7 


Webster 


10 


Wilmot 












24 


2 


9 




159 


64 


338 


185 


1,930 


283 


559 











NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



285 





For Governor. 


HILLSBOROUGH 
COUNTY. 


«5* • 

H4 CD 
> 

t» r 

£ a 


Rosecr's W. Pillsbury, 
Rep., Londonderry. 


John C. Hutchins, 
Dem., Stratford. 


i 

® O 

u 

»2 f-> 
r4 as 

. ® 
< 


Amherst 


17 
68 
33 
13 
19 

*37 

113 

11 

15 

11 

107 

53 

63 

17 

15 

223 

261 

282 

153 

61 

222 

41 

102 

180 

100 

' 81 

119 

128 

9 

25 

128 

10 

131 

90 

23 

29 

13 

41 

61 

45 

23 

24 

20 

7 

45 

"6 

13 

22 

4 


20 
53 
30 
2 
1 
1 

12 

45 

6 

4 

4 

91 

29 

36 

5 

13 

161 

196 

227 

226 

49 

177 

55 

136 

203 

77 

76 

100 

120 

6 

29 

57 

13 

88 

55 

14 

18 

9 

34 

27 

60 

20 

17 

23 

5 

7 

4 

8 

7 

16 

1 


2 

12 

10 

3 

4 

6 

5 

38 

12 

*14 

13 
4- 
3 
5 
6 

23 

29 

32 

26 
126 

73 
167 

82 

13 

33 

75 

18 

17 

"4 

7 

6 
15 
13 
51 
15 
15 
20 
49 
44 
47 
11 

2 

8 

3 

"i 

20 

12 

2 


2 
12 


Bedford 


8 




2 




5 




11 








10 




1 




12 




1 




12 


Hollis 


1 




3 




2 




1 




22 




16 




28 




36 




241 


Manchester — Ward 6 


66 




202 




95 


Manchester — Ward 9 


28 


Manchester — Ward 10 


36 




97 


Manchester — Ward 12 


34 


Manchester — Ward 13 


54 




5 




4 
5 






3 




11 




17 


Nashua — Ward 3 


61 




19 




31 


Nashua — Ward 6 


33 




62 




105 




60 




4 




3 

4 


Pelham 




17 
2 
3 






Weare 


3 

17 




Windsor 



286 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



HILLSBOROUGH 
COUNTY. 



Amherst 

Antrim 

Bedford 

Bennington . . 

Brookline 

Deering 

Francestown . 
Goffstown .... 

Greenfield 

Greenville 

Hancock 

Hillsborough 

Hollis 

Hudson 

Litchfield 

Lyndeborough 
Manchester — 

Ward 1 .... 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 .... 

Ward 4 .... 

Ward 5 .... 

Ward 6 .... 

Ward 7 ... 

Ward 8 .... 

Ward 9 .... 

Ward 10 ... 

Ward 11 ... 

Ward 12 ... 

Ward 13 ... 

Mason 

Merrimack ... 

Milford , 

Mont Vernon 
Nashua — 

Ward 1 ... 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 9 ... 
New Boston 
New Ipswich 

P'elham 

Peterborough 

Sharon 

Temple 

Weare 

Wilton 

Windsor 



For Congressman. 



s 



e w 



Totals 1,172 



161 

185 

188 

132 

29 

117 

26 

96 

117 

61 

52 

26 

45 

'25 



W 2 



hfi • 

'<- Pi 
o o 



10 



24 



62 
89 

148 

132 
51 

143 
22 
51 

126 
30 
40 

137 



5* 






1,185 



32 



73 



173 

199 

192 

137 

54 

145 

48 

94 

165 

91 

71 

54 

106 

'30 



10 






u a, 
Ct5 



24 



43 



59 

59 

295 

148 

282 

136 

31 

65 

144 

40 

61 



10 



£p 



H - 
e3 A 



1,755 1 1,458 



33 
116 

'l6 

20 

*52 

'20 
16 
15 

168 
75 



20 

204 
146 
35 
45 
22 
82 
90 
105 
39 
42 
42 

'57 

5 

13 

18 

37 

5 

1.745 



h o 

^6 



03 2. 



10 
13 
66 
10 
26 
23 
54 
74 
41 

"2 

"6 

2 

7 
9 
1 

396 



02 « 

n g 

c 
o r 

>> <» 

1 
16 

"4 

6 



15 
12 
34 
18 
12 
25 
40 
60 
59 
13 
3 

10 

2 

'is 

18 
1 

440 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



287 



CHESHIRE 
COUNTY. 



Alstead 

Chesterfield . . . 

Dublin 

Fitzwilliam 

Gilsum 

Harrisville 

Hinsdale 

Jaffrey 

Keene — Ward 1 
Keene — Ward 2 
Keene — Ward 3 
Keene — Ward 4 
Keene — Ward 5 
Marlborough . . 

Marlow 

Nelson 

Richmond 

Rindge 

Roxbury 

Stoddard 

Sullivan 

Surry 

Swanzey 

Troy 

Walpole 

Westmoreland . 
Winchester 

Totals 





For Governor 




For Congressman. 




£ 






1 








Sh . 




A 






CO 




2 >. 




bl) 






C 


09 • 

MS 


CO U 

o 
<a>-l 


CO 


CD O 
O ° 

^ s 

. CD 


a 

o 

to 
. co 

tug 

t3 


o . 

CD u 
U O 

% 

co . 


> 

c 




Id 




SS 




■Sa 


sa 






a a. 






03 0) 








ofi 
Ha 






6 H 


c3Q 


17 


n 


10 


2 


27 




11 


16 


4 


1 


2 


15 


2 


1 


30 


18 


1 


3 


45 


2 


1 


13 


7 




2 


18 




2 


10 


3 


2 




12 


i 




8 


2 


8 


11 


10 


2 


15 


65 


41 


5 


6 


90 


2 


5 


33 


3 


11 


34 


37 


8 


30 


102 


89 


7 


3 


160 


6 


5 


89 


61 


5 


2 


128 


4 


1 


65 


57 


8 


15 


119 


8 


15 


61 


5 


3 


5 


59 


4 


4 


17 


26 


5 


20 


42 


15 


8 


10 


1 


6 


3 


13 


6 


3 


15 


17 


5 


2 


22 


2 


4 


7 


3 


2 


1 


11 


1 


2 


7 


2 


6 


1 


9 


1 


5 


51 


18 


4 


6 


61 




8 


8 








6 






5 


9 


2. 


7 


14 


2 


3 


12 


3 




2 


14 


1 


1 


18 


6 


1 


1 


19 




2 


16 


9 


8 


10 


23 


12 


5 


16 


26 


10 


2 


29 


1 


9 


35 


11 


23 


3 


41 


8 


18 


39 


27 


9 


1 


62 






71 


13 


14 


3 


72 


3 


12 


S36 


472 


149 


147 


1,158 


91 


170 



288 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SULLIVAN 
COUNTY. 



Acworth . . . 
Charlestown 
Claremont . 

Cornish 

Croydon . . . 
Goshen 
Grantham .. 
Langdon . . . 
Lempster . . 
Newport . . . 
Plainfield . . 
Springfield 
Snnapee . . . 

Unity 

Washington 

Totals . 



For Governor. 



MS 



u Q. 

5« 



23 

74 
150 
50 
10 
15 
4 

12 
17 
239 
25 
12 
20 
21 
7 



PM C 






679 



10 

22 
100 



1 
5 
5 
113 
4 

15 
3 

19 
6 



.a* 



oft 



322 



fcjg 



<1 H 



230 



For Congressman. 









232 

50 

11 

18 

5 

18 
22 

298 
30 
22 
20 
32 
12 



0n3 



^O 



S* 



156 



131 



pi 
> 

$% 

.** 

«g 

a 
o r 

aa 

7 

16 

72 

41 

2 

3 

9 

5 

11 

71 

2 

3 

16 
5 
5 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



289 



GRAFTON 
COUNTY. 



Alexandria 
Ashland 

Bath 

Benton 

Bethlehem . 
Bridgewater 

Bristol 

Campton . . . 

Canaan 

Dorchester 

Easton 

Ellsworth . . 

Enfield 

Franconia . 
Grafton . . , 

Groton 

Hanover . . . 
Haverhill . . 
Hebron 
Holderness 

Landaff 

Lebanon ... 

Lincoln 

Lisbon 

Littleton ... 
Livermore . 

Lyman 

Lyme 

Monroe .... 

Orange 

Orf ord 

Piermont .. 
Plymouth . . 
Rumney . . . 
Thornton . 
Warren . . . 
Waterville , 
Wentworth 
Woodstock , 

Totals , 



For Governor. 



Qrfl 

MS 

> 



H ft 

£ _ 



10 
19 
42 
6 
34 

*32 

50 
96 
12 
1 

"n 

10 

it; 
n 

66 
349 

4 
33 

7 
150 
18 
84 
61 

1 

9 

65 
35 
10 
23 
28 
74 
26 
12 
25 

8 
13 
18 



1,532 



p-i PI 

o 

•T3 






2 

270 



oft 



.1:1 



For Congressman. 



la 



ii 

5 
3 

3 

"5 

"7 

"2 

"7 

12 
1 
1 
9 

10 
4 
.1 
1 

13 
2 
5 

11 

"3 

2 



* eS 



03 ft 



505 



147 



10 
45 
36 
4 
28 

*35 

no 

79 
13 
1 

'162 

9 

17 

10 

60 

279 

4 

61 

5 

154 

17 

S7 

no 

2 



•4 
© . 

O F* 
U o 

Pi 

• o 



■si 



1,520 



142 



PI 
o : 

aa 



13 

45 

12 

1 

25 

29 

4 

12 

11 

26 

9 

44 

52 

1 

17 

12 

3 

4 

2 

6 

29 

9 

4 

7 

31 

3 

516 



290 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



COOS 
COUNTY. 





For Governor. 




h 






pi £ 






^2 h 




°5— ; 




.S* 






a b 


MS 


o 


y O 


> 


w h5 






§ ft 


gS 


S3 © 




5 • 


M# 


<2P3 


oft 


M 


M 


1-3 



For Congressman. 



® 2 

I! 



Wjg 



£* 






6 fl 



S3 
o r 

aa 



Berlin— Ward 1 

Berlin— Ward 2 

Berlin— Ward 3 

Berlin— Ward 4 

Carroll 

Clark sville 

Colebrook 

Columbia 

Balton 

Dummer 

Errol 

Gorham 

Jefferson 

Lancaster 

Milan 

Northumberland 

Pittsburg 

Randolph 

Shelburne 

Stark 

Stewartstown 

Stratford 

Wentworth's Location 

Whitefield 

Totals 



32 


69 


44 


12 


115 


36 


55 


8 


88 


122 


5 


3 


44 


20 


21 


5 


11 


10 


10 


8 


1 


2 


11 




43 


130 


87 


1 


29 


37 


18 




20 


17 


2 


4 


7 




6 




19 




11 


2 


56 


39 


28 


9 


19 


6 


21 


3 


160 


45 


92 


15 


26 


10 


6 


3 


52 


9 


26 


5 


53 


11 


7 


1 


6 




1 


1 


15 


14 


4 


1 


6 


2 


9 


1 


35 


67 


29 




9 


9 


137 
1 


2 


89 


51 


40 


5 


935 


706 


671 


89 











84 
110 
131 

49 

18 

3 

150 

65 



84 
26 
192 
29 
42 
45 

5 
25 

7 
94 
17 

"ll8 

1,342 



14 



26 
239 



4 

6 

24 

16 

62 

7 

13 

4 

2 

4 

10 

9 

102 

*15 

428 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



291 







For Governor. 












rC 










- bJO 








ca • 


© 


SUMMARY BY 


<»r^ 


W S3 
o 


pjrtf 


C o 


COUNTIES. 




A o 

"3"e3 
^02 


c o 

CO 




H 


© ft 








0> 




■§fl 






a« 


&* 


5° 


Rockingham 


1,378 


2,039 


486 


195 


Strafford 


1,256 


1,468 


562 


253 


Belknap 


596 


484 


186 


83 




558 
1,640 


264 
985 


174 

696 


49 


Merrimack 


353 


Hillsborough 


3,314 


2,673 


1,196 


1,507 




836 

679 

1,532 


472 
322 
270 


149 
230 
505 


147 




156 


Grafton 


147 




935 


706 


671 


89 






Totals 


12,724 


9,683 


4,855 


2,979 









For Congressman. 






SUMMARY 

BY 
COUNTIES. 


2 ri 

©£ 
Sg 
a .a 

A S 

03 « 


a 

o . 
03 CD 

.£ cu 

W-g 

. si 

M <J3 


> © 

O co 

a © 

eS 


T& O 
t> « 


o 

CO 

. CO 


o 

i 6 


CO 

© 
© 
03 

« g 

a 
o r 




1* 


od 


s£ 


■§1 


p © 


■Bfl 


P. © 




£<* 


C$5ti 


&* 


OQ 
C3 H 




g° 




Rockingham 


961 


467 


2,012 


653 








Strafford 


806 


304 


1,639 


751 










312 


126 


600 


259 








Carroll 


142 


90 


592 


229 








Merrimack 


159 


64 


338 


185 


1,930 


283 


559 


Hillsborough 


1,172 


1,185 


1,755 


1,458 


1,745 


396 


440 


Cheshire 










1,158 


91 


170 












888 
1,520 
1,342 


131 
142 


268 




516 












239 


428 






Totals 


3,552 


2,236 


6,936 


3,535 


8,583 


1,282 


2,381 





292 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



COUNCILOR— 
District No. 1. 



Albany 

Alexandria 

Ashland 

Bartlett 

Bath 

Benton 

Berlin — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Bethlehem 

Bridgewater 

Bristol 

Campton 

Canaan 

Carroll 

Chatham 

Clarksville 

Colebrook 

Columbia 

Conway 

Dalton 

Dorchester 

Dummer 

Easton 

Eaton 

Effingham 

Ellsworth 

Enfield 

Errol 

Pranconia 

Freedom 

G-orham 

Grafton 

Croton 

Hart's Location... 

Hanover 

Haverhill 

Hebron 

Holderness 

Jackson 



03 ft 



3 

2 
20 

3 
13 

1 

111 

150 

233 

61 

4 

"19 

18 

72 

6 

3 



K -I 

25 



>o 



a* 



5 


46 


11 


51 


5 


9 


1 


12 


32 


17 



14 

37 

27 

15 

2 

3 

139 

69 

38 

32 

13 

1 

"l2 
8 

"55 

6 

8 

25 

14 



2 
39 
217 

"45 
K 



eg cS 
. O 



District No. 1. 
—Concluded. 



Jefferson 

Lancaster 

Landaff 

Lebanon 

Lincoln 

Lisbon 

Littleton 

Livermore 

Lyman 

Lyme 

Madison 

Milan 

Monroe 

Moultonborough . . 
Northumberland . . 

Orange 

Orford 

Ossipee 

Piermont 

Pittsburg 

Plymouth 

Randolph 

Rumney 

Sandwich 

Shelburne 

Stark 

Stewartstown 

Stratford 

Tamworth 

Thornton 

Tuf tonboro 

Warren 

Waterville 

Wentworth 

Wentworth's Lo- 
cation 

Whitefield 

Wolf eboro 

Woodstock 






03 ft 



&3 
m S 
C5 



x« 



Totals 



6 
25 

"76 

8 

30 

35 

'"2 

39 

7 

25 

13 

162 

28 

1 

3 

15 
17 
3 

11 
4 
7 
25 
15 
3 
7 
3 
29 



21 
173 



1,773 2.019 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



293 





























u 










U 








>» 


o 








t» 


o 








03 


a 


+3 






03 

• 


s 


,4 






f* h 




«o 2 






fl * 




■a ^ 


CILOR 


M 


03 © 


2 . 


o £ 


District No. 2. 


.44 


03 03 


S .• 


8§ 

o S 


ct No. 2. 


o3 f-< 


& 


& 03 
> 

Oft 




— Concluded. 


o3 U 


,4 


. o 
Oft 


00 00 




O > 
O 




03 £ 

CU ° 




o 




03 Jh 




*i 


73 p. 


2ft 


O r 




ti ft 


Oj - 

T, ft 


2ft 






S "< 


03 03 




•X% 




03 4> 


o3 o 




-3,2. 




Stf 


£« 


H« 


oH 




r ntf 


^g 


*ti 


oft 




h 


o 


<J 


Ha 
1 




l=H 


o 


^ 


1-0 


»on 


10 


9 


2 


Newington 


1 


2 




5 




16 
11 


23 

28 


2 


lb 
21 


Newmarket 


15 

11 


31 

23 


25 

1 


54 


tead 

igton 


5 


10 


55 


91 


25 


North Hampton 


2 


24 


1 


10 


nt 


5 


35 


3 


12 


Northwood 


2 


23 


13 


8 


wood 


15 


31 


3 


7 


Nottingham 


14 


47 


10 


12 


field 


3 


3 


4 


3 


Plaistow 


9 


20 


7 


5 


lie 


6 


72 


1 


2 


Portsmouth — 










eld 


19 


45 


6 


23 


Ward 1 


29 


38 


30 


15 












Ward 2 


32 


114 


102 


38 


d 1 


151 


30 


159 


16 


Ward 3 


1 


18 


17 


43 


d 2 


128 


20 


112 


34 


Ward 4 


20 


20 


25 


9 


d 3 


81 


10 


177 


17 


Ward 5 


39 


19 


5 


7 


i 4 


134 


11 


185 


81 


Rochester- 










i 5 


1 




5 


92 


Ward 1 


16 


125 


6 


18 


Tl 


24 


20 


25 


7 


Ward 2 


5 


75 


3 


23 


Kingston.. 


5 


9 


2 


16 


Ward 3 


2 


92 


7 


8 


r 


7 

118 

9 


29 
201 
219 


3 
100 

20 


82 
23 
12 


Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 


1 

13 
3 


84 

87 

147 


2 
4 
5 


35 


' 


7 


lgton 


12 


it 


7 


19 


12 


6 


Rollinsford 


23 


3 


9 


56 


L 


11 
5 


20 
38 


5 
17 


7 
'0 


Rye 

San down 


4 

2 


10 
13 


7 
2 


12 


ton 


5 


and 


1 


30 


53 


2 


Seabrook 


26 


56 


7 


19 


tead 


22 


45 


3 


7 


Somersworth — 










on 


17 


64 


33 


9 


Wai-d 1 


7 


41 


9 


36 


on Falls. . 


19 


37 


10 


3 


Ward 2 


7 


38 


9 


63 


gton 


7 


9 


4 


6 


Ward 3 


10 


19 


5 


41 


?n 


4 


26 


6 


i 29 


Ward 4 


4 


2 


3 


117 




4 
16 


10 

8 


6 
10 


21 
1 11 


Ward 5 

South Hampton. 


3 

2 


4 
4 


1 
5 


52 


ry 


1 






11 


6 


11 


Strafford 


10 


57 


7 


10 




8 
6 


115 

7 


9 


8 
9 


Stratham 

Wakefield 


4 
5 


9 

40 


13 
13 


3 


irham. .. . 


23 


tie 


1 


2 


3 


10 




















ds 


11 


22 


5 


6 


Totals 


1,114 


2,598 


1,435 


1,346 



294 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

















U 


u 




a 6 


M 




<S © 












Sra 


« « 






. « 


COUNCILOR 


3 » 


-u^ 


District No. 3. 


3 ® 


® 2 

So 


District No. 3. 


M a 

. <3 




—Concluded. 


M pi 

. 03 


IS 




^ 


£^ 




£S 


£S 




%<i 






■Sa 


sa 




s ® 


MH (D 




s » 








B° 






a« 


Auburn 


36 


7 


Manchester — 








79 
53 


21 


Ward 7 . 


77 
216 


297 




Ward 8 . . . 


131 




294 


74 


Ward 9 ., 


332 


36 




39 
150 


9 
13 


Ward 10 


162 
144 


58 




Ward 11 


136 




333 
400 


37 
41 


Ward 12 , 


186 

185 

23 


45 


Ward 1 


Ward 13 . 


59 


Ward 2 


Raymond 


29 


Ward 3 


441 

334 

92 

340 


56 

55 

278 

148 


113 
29 


U 


Ward 4 




3 


Ward 5 . . 


Totals 




Ward 6 


4,058 


1,544 







.XEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



295 



COUNCILOR 
District No. 4. 




Alstead 

Amherst 

Antrim 

Bedford 

Bennington . 
Brookline ... 
Chesterfield . 

Deering 

Dublin 

Fitzwilliam . 
Francestown . 

Gilsum 

Goffstown . . . 
Greenfield — 

Greenville 

Hancock 

Harrisville . . , 
Hillsborough 

Hinsdale 

Hollis 

Hudson 

Jaff rey 

Keene — 

Ward 1 .... 

Ward 2 .... 

Ward 3 .... 

Ward 4 ... 

Ward 5 .... 
Litchfield .... 
Lyndeborough 
Marlborough . 

Marlow 

Mason 

Merrimack . . . 



18 
28 

110 
55 
12 
19 
15 
2 
37 
17 
46 
12 

136 
19 
16 
14 
8 

156 
83 
66 
89 
35 

141 
110 
102 
55 
35 
22 
26 
12 
21 
14 



District No. 4. 
—Concluded. 



Milford 

Mont Vernon. 
Nashua — 



Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 8 .... 

Ward 9 .... 

Nelson 

New Boston . 
New Ipswich 

Pelham 

Peterborough 

Richmond 

Rindge 

Roxbury 

Sharon 

Stoddard 

Sullivan 

Surry 

Swanzey 

Temple 

Troy 

Walpole 

Weare 

Westmoreland 

Wilton 

Winchester . .. 
Windsor 









«8 . 


£ cS 


CO 5 


,cl 


. «2 


Q «8 


a 


03 ." 


S » 




js« 


145 


18 



193 
122 
^7 
39 
17 
53 
77 
86 
28 
10 
40 
37 
13 



Totals 



2.914 



«1 

Is 



12 



47 
9 


14 
6 


60 


8 


5 




4 


2 


12 


7 


12 


2 


20 


2 


19 


17 


12 


2 


25 


12 


38 


25 


18 


21 


56 




34 


26 


59 


14 


5 


2 



296 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



COUNCILOR 
District No. 5. 



Acworth 

Allenstown 

Andover 

Boscawen 

Bow 

Bradford 

Canterbury . . . 
Center Harbor 
Charlestown . . 

Chichester 

Claremont 

Concord — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 

Ward 7 

Ward 8 

Ward 9 

Cornish 

Croydon 

Danbury 

Dunbarton 

Epsom 

Franklin — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Goshen 

Grantham 

Henniker 

Hill 













>*. 


Sh 


-=i . 


fl 


Ort 


v£ 


3S 


a 


§S 






tti 3 


H° 


TS 










2 5 


>> 0J 


rdpj 


i*Q 


H 


A 


29 


7 


22 


12 


21 


21 


26 


9 


48 


8 


24 


25 


31 


20 


22 


9 


75 


17 


39 


21 


215 


120 


70 


75 


19 


14 


68 


31 


210 


75 


181 


38 


187 


68 


236 


27 


23 


35 


30 


52 


43 


4 


10 


3 


43 


19 


23 


5 


54 


22 


95 


8 


49 


49 


139 


48 


13 


9 


4 


12 


33 


9 


31 


5 



District No. 
— Concluded. 



Hopkinton 
Langdon . 
Laconia — 



Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 

Lempster 

Loudon 

Meredith 

New Hampton. 
New London... 

Newbury 

Newport 

Northfield 

Pembroke 

Pittsfield 

Plainfield 

Salisbury 

Sanbornton . . . 

Springfield 

Sunapee 

Sutton 

Tilton 

Unity 

Warner 

Washington ... 

Webster 

Wilmot 



tti ^ 

> 



^P3 



85 
58 
92 
94 

123 
20 
56 
44 
22 
28 
16 

299 
34 
45 

145 
29 
24 
42 
24 
22 
14 
53 



Totals 



3,774 



A . 

find 
o 

sa 

ft 



1,487 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



297 









FIRST 






FIRST 




*» . 


SENATORIAL 




>> . 


SENATORIAL 


®" 




DISTRICT. 


©0 




DISTRICT. 


3 J§ 


Qfc 


—Concluded. 


2ja 


ft h 




^o 


.ffl 




£o 


.PQ 




go 


1-5 




%® 


1-5 




t» r 
52 ft 


^0 




►. .- 

£3 ft 


S 




d © 


e ® 




pi © 


c © 




fi« 


o3Q 




fl« 


c3Q 




6 
8 


6 
13 


Berlin — 
Ward 1 


85 




Errol 


54 


Jorham 


107 


39 


Ward 2 


111 


57 


Milan 


29 


10 


Ward 3 


155 


10 


Randolph 


6 


2 


Ward 4 


40 


22 




26 


5 










1 


1 


Totals 


574 


219 











u 






© 






Pi 






d 






w S 


•S'S 




m g 


AM 




© 5 


cc O 


SECOND 


© © 


02 O 


SECOND 


3-8 


^£ 


SENATORIAL 


5-S 




SENATORIAL 


•3 




DISTRICT. 


-,d 


DISTRICT. 




. c 


—Concluded. 




■ O 




.M 


<}© 




.« 


<J^ 




G 






o 


h - 




d ft 


3 r* 
r° 




d ft 


^0 




S3 © 






- as 






ra 


5I« 


' 


t"3 


£° 


ethlehem 


34 


17 


Northumberland 


49 


29 


arroll 


21 


20 


Pittsburg 


43 


10 


larksville 


3 


11 


Stark 


7 


10 




140 
61 


87 
17 


Stewartstown 


74 
17 


28 




125 




35 
13 

24 
184 


7 

32 

26 

100 


Whitefield 


126 


42 


. 








Totals 


831 


561 











298 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



















a 






a 




















^ . 






^ . 


THIRD 


A 


3 


THIRD 


A 


3§ 


SENATORIAL 


^0 

© O 


aj 


SENATORIAL 


t>>2 
© 


© 


DISTRICT. 


•af 


#£ 


DISTRICT. 


aS 


22 




-Si? 


M 2 


—Concluded. 


03 >, 


M 3 




CO PL, 




CQPU 




tj : 


a J 




nd r 


ri i 




£ ft 

a as 


£ S 




<1 W 






35 
3 


21 
6 


Lisbon 


86 
8 


42 




Lyman 


21 




51 


2 




28 


5 


Easton 


1 


9 


Plymouth 


85 


42 




280 
62 


43 
14 


Piermont 


21 
15 


7 




Thornton 


5 




6 
67 


12 

70 


Woodstock 


20 


s 








19 


9 


Totals 


787 


315 











£ 








£ 






FOURTH 





rigrej 


£ 


FOURTH 


!h 


©2 




SENATORIAL 


©s 


o> © 


1? 


SENATORIAL 


©s 


© © 
|> © 


DISTRICT. 


3 ft 


DISTRICT. 


Sft 


££ 




OJ 






—Concluded. 


W 


M 


a 




fio 


°^ 


.-Jq 




fio 


o£ 


^Q 






pj 


O r 




-^ 


a . 


- 




© a 


r£3 ft 


£ § 




03 ~ 
© ft 


03 ^ 

,23 ft 


nS 




Cj © 


53 © 


J3 J? 




SS © 








£tf 


*W 


op 




r ^tf 


^tf 


ofl 




H 


£ 


1-3 




H 


3 


'-a 


Albany 


5 


3 


4 


Moultonborough ... 


12 


159 


7 




8 
2 


1 
9 


20 
3 




13 

72 


8 
20 


3 


Brookfield 




23 


5 


2 


8 




21 


21 


16 


Conway 


52 


42 


26 


Tamworth 


58 


18 


11 




12 


1 


12 


Tuftonboro 


28 


7 


10 




5 
7 
2 


8 
25 


5 

32 

2 


Wakefield 


7 

6 

38 


58 

2 

65 


22 




Waterville 

Wolfeboro 




Hart's Location 


11 




7 


2 


12 










Livermore 




2 


1 


Totals 


360 


4.53 


228 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



299 



FIFTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 



Ashland . . . 

Alexandria 

Bridgewater 

Bristol 

Canaan 

Dorchester . 
Ellsworth . . 

Enfield 

Grafton 

Groton 

Hanover . . . 



VT3 



A - 
ftd 

-I 



10 
8 

a 

90 
U 

115 
6 
6 

18 



t> a 



£ d 
o o 



O CO 

03 cc 

w c 

. CO 



FIFTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 



Hebron 

Lebanon 

Lyme 

New Hampton. 

Orange 

Orford 

Rumney 

Warren 

Wentworth 



Totals 425 





(3 




03 


h 


£ 


<D 






4s fi 




ce c 


eg 


.rC 


W l 


^ 






A - 


CO - 


£ft 


Sp 




o c 


Stf 


£ K 


i-s 


&H 




3 


55 


139 


37 


36 


9 


17 


2 


9 


7 


19 


13 


11 


10 


12 


9 


2 


425 


406 



O 03 
. CO 



27 
244 



SIXTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 



a 
*s d 





15 
8 

14 
5 
7 

16 

14 
45 


Barnstead 

Belmont 

Center Harbor 

Gilford 


Laconia — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 







•2 . 


-ec 


f-i CO 


M'2 


a>.« 


S c 


£g 


^s 


MS 


03 

ffl 'J 


CQ 


© - 


-tf ft 


fcJD J- 


CD <D 


O ® 


l^ 
R 


^ fl 


22 


16 


29 


22 


34 


13 


16 


10 


33 


7 


55 


13 


36 


26 


64 


27 



SIXTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 



Laconia— 
Ward 3 
Ward 4 
Ward 5 
Ward 6 



^ 



&« 



Meredith 19 

Sanbornton 11 



Totals 341 



U cc 

a,. ~ 
■§§ 

MS 

-d ft 

CD <U 



o s 

o 

. CO 



,"Kft 



653 



6 



74 
18 
14 
32 
11 

235 



300 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SEVENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 


Obe Gr. Morrison, 
Rep., Northfield. 


Charles P. Coakley, 
Dem., Concord. 


SEVENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 


OS 0> 

** 

6 r 

ft 


1 

Charles P. Coakley, 
Dem., Concord. J 




19 

25 

68 
19 
34 
41 

97 
55 


19 
8 

65 
15 
18 
19 

44 
43 

1 


Franklin — 

Ward 3 

Hill 


156 
30 
26 
39 
68 
23 










4 


Ward 1 


New London 

Northfield 

Tilton 


15 


Ward 2 


9 




33 




Wilmot 

Totals 


8 


Franklin — 
Ward 1 . 




700 


307 


Ward 2 













2 ■£ 






S*+5 


EIGHTH 


fl . 


yg 


EIGHTH 


fl . 


^5 


SENATORIAL 


■g h 


H 2 


SENATORIAL 


tt 


H 2 


DISTRICT. 


£ ft 


^3 ® 


DISTRICT. 


JS ft 




m^ 


w 3 


—Concluded. 


ffl Js 


^ 
















2* 


w^ 




S* 


H<-> 




® ft 


^S 




® ft 


N 






id <» 






c 3 




1-5 






1-3 


W fi 


Acworth 


34 


7 


Newport 


326 


109 




77 


19 


Plainfield 


30 


11 


Claremont 


226 


161 


Springfield 


25 


4 


Cornish 


55 


5 


Sunapee 


22 


15 




6 


3 


Unity 


32 


12 




4 


13 


Washington 


11 


6 




20 


9 










17 


9 


Totals 


906 


398 




21 


15 













NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



301 





£ be 






.-A 


e 


NINTH 


PQ o 


It 


NINTH 


2 ^ 
eg 
PQ o 


1* 


SENATORIAL 


,Cl 


DO'S 


SENATORIAL 


& 


GQ w 


DISTRICT. 


nis 




DISTRICT. 


W" 






C K 


^CC 


—Concluded. 


c w 


^cc 




Bi 


o S 




s ^ 


Ss 






U <D - 










£* 


2Q r 




•J3 pj 


PQ 


Antrim 


117 


20 


Hopkinton 


59 


25 


Bradford 


22 


23 


Newbury 


16 


42 


Concord — 






Salisbury 


21 


36 


Ward 3 


69 

240 

1 


31 
25 
16 


Sutton 


15 
79 
20 


13 


Ward 7 


10 






15 




51 
37 


3 
11 




4 


2 










207 


21 


Totals 


958 


293 







TENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 



ead ... 
jterfield 
um .... 
le— 

ard 1 . 
ard 2 . 
ard 3 . 
ard 4 . 
ard 5 . 
Sow . . . 



K g 






So 
^■'^ 

> 03 

a 

53 r 
3 ft 
ra » 









>> 


fit 










S Of 


i 




M 

* ft 




2 . 


3ft 


^s 








s° 


1 


10 




2 


1 


1 


17 




18 


8 


25 




9 


23 


9 


8 




8 



TENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 



Nelson 

Roxbury 

Stoddard 

Sullivan 

Surry 

Walpole 

Westmoreland 

Totals 






u ft 

u <D 



:u(i 



St 



a 



310 



119 



2 © 

w ft 

S - 

1— 1 CD 



122 



302 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



ELEVENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 



Bennington . . 

Dublin j 12 

Pitzwilliam I 13 

Hancock 

Harrisville ... 

Hinsdale 

Jaffrey 

Marlborough 
Peterborough 











© 


bO 







© 


^ O 



.bo 




."SrO 


'C 




H 

T, ft 


• Cm 


w 

03 S3 




c3 © 
r3Gw 




m 


■go 

525 


2 


13 


1 


1 


12 


38 




2 


13 


6 




2 


3 


15 


8 


3 


5 


5 


17 


1 


75 
9 
6 


17 

27 
6 


5 

21 
7 


*16 

1 


14 


41 


10 


8 



ELEVENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

— Concluded. 



Richmond . 

Rindge 

Sharon 

Swanzey . . 

Troy 

Winchester 

Totals . 









© 


bo 


on . 


© 


P 


S = 






bo 








s © 




7! a 




sa 


03 © 


g 03 


G ® 


^m 


N m 


J^A 


o 


s 


CQ 


2 


6 




57 


17 




3 


1 


2 


15 


8 


10 


15 


19 


6 


69 


12 


10 


300 


231 


97 









h 










£ 








J3 










■fl 








>> 


© 








>> 




,0 




TWELFTH 


13 

C3 W 


P>H^ 


. 
Eh ® 


c3 O 


TWELFTH 


es eo 


OfH 


. 
Eh ,2 


tS 


SENATORIAL 


Ka 






ma 


SENATORIAL 


Wa 




^ 03 


ma 


DISTRICT. 


o 


pq ^ 


H^ 


DISTRICT. 
—Concluded. 


dW 


poa 
> 


^ 




a ft 


a 

a ft 


to 

03 - 
"S ft 


© : 

8?fl 




a ft 


a . 

a ft 


03 ~ 


© ? 

S?a 
























£* 


s« 


8" 


©Q 




£* 


£« 


-*3ft3 






3 

4 
7 
3 
76 


20 
5 
6 
2 

11 


13 

12 

5 

13 

1 


"9 

12 

11 

3 


Mont Vernon 

Nashua- 
Ward 1 

• Ward 2 

New Ipswich 


3 

112 

65 

2 


12 

82 
51 


8 

22 
20 
45 


7 








AS 




?I0 


Hollis 


6 


Lyndeborough 


14 


5 


10 


7 




3 


1 


15 


4 


2 

22 
30 


"5 
93 


14 
26 

58 


7 
8 

H 


Wilton 


4 


8 


30 


SO 


Merrimack 

Milf ord 






Totals 


350 


301 


292 


159 









NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



303 



THIRTEENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 


c . 

o3 c3 
rt CO 

° ft 


© • 
fa 2 

2 

ft* 

si 

e3Q 


a 
.2 

S* 

M c 
.4 

. CO 

1-5 TO 

© r 
a| 

1° 

15 
10 
20 

22 
29 


« CO 
H TO 

s © 

w 

66 

4 

2 

15 

23 


THIRTEENTH 
SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 


Marcel Theriault, 
Rep., Nashua. 


TO 
© g 


c 

TO 

e 

3* 

J OS 

C . 
© . 

ft§ 

CO 


o3 e3 
=3 02 


tshua — 
Ward 3 


13 

21 
2 

'33 


26 
19 
25 
26 
50 


Nashua — 


36 
12 


62 
32 


44 

20 


43 

57 


Ward 4 




Ward 5 


Totals 


Ward 6 


117 


240 


160 


210 


Vard 7 













f-T 












FOURTEENTH 


c3 O 


^5 


m2 

Co 

© h 


FOURTEENTH 


c c 
^ 


© 

£2 


C 
© M 


SENATORIAL 


Wg 


CO 


© g 

Pm © 


SENATORIAL 


W M 


fetrt 


£^ 


DISTRICT. 


SH 


wS 


DISTRICT. 


5c 


Pm 


Pm © 




^o 


Pm 


Ph 


—Concluded. 


H^ 


Pm 




to : 

fH ft 


CD . 






© . 

*H ft 


© : 

rO ft 


S - 




©rrj 


fi« 






©ai 


3* 


1* 




4 
33 


19 

26 


12 
15 




8 
31 


67 

7 


14 


Bedford 


New Boston 


15 




5 


46 
43 
10 


7 
21 

K 




9 

19 
15 


41 

171 

1 


26 




Pittsfield 


55 


Dunbarton 


Weare 


21 




10 


50 
8 


24 
| 44 










Goffstown 


1 152 


Totals 


316 


515 


267 




i 16 


26 


8 















304 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



FIFTEENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 


o 

CO . 

© U 

±L o 

"SS 

•° & 

opcj 


.2 

H 

si 

. © 

©° 

'd ; 
1:8 d 

4- O 


FIFTEENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 



O 
CO • 

<£ U 
+* O 

*d 

Pm s 

& . 

,D ft 

oK 


R o 
. © 

S : 
J§ 


Concord — 
Ward 4 


275 

187 

199 

23 


85 
43 

79 
37 


Concord — 
Ward 9 


32 


48 


Ward 5 


Totals 


656 




Ward 6 

. Ward 8 


292 











SIXTEENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 



Manchester- 
Ward 1 .. 
Ward 2 .. 















© O) 


© fH 

M 


- S 

.S to 




S 2 


3-3 


pi 
.a 


(2 


<3 d 


Kg 


Q^ 


1-3 




M : 


a » 


a ft 


& S 


■3 * 


.— < a. 




1-3 


£« 


41 


154 


228 


251 


209 


41 



SIXTEENTH 
SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 



Manchester- 
Ward 9 .. 



Totals 

















© u 


© s 


32 


d*§ 


a-s l 


5 d 


d 


.3 


wg 


»"5 


s 






d ft 


a a 


-d ^ 




1-5 


g« 


177 


200 


582 


637 



s-s 



34 

116 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



305 



SEVENTEENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 



Manchester — 
Ward 3 .... 
Ward 4 .... 



-33 

to . 



172 
157 



^ ft 



327 
216 










u 


. M 


SEVENTEENTH 


- » 


. ® 


5" 


SENATORIAL 


s ® 


o> a> 




DISTRICT. 


og 


d S 


&t 3 


—Concluded. 


£fe 


ft* 5 




-^ 


.a 


W£j 




W . 


o 


a - 




i* 


"tf & 


£a 




y« 


r 8« 


5° 


Manchester- 








Ward 10 


87 


85 


58 


Totals 




416 


628 


171 







EIGHTEENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 



[anchester- 
Ward 5 . . 
Ward 7 .. 
Ward 8 .. 





*h' 


► ^ 


m 




0) 






O CO 

CO o> 


13 "3 


31 


© to 

OS'S 








"3 - 


'R ft 


r 


■Sfi 


03 « 




1-5 


<d 






tun 


s" 


2 


111 


90 


163 


3 


64 


91 


222 


17 


79 


42 


37 



EIGHTEENTH 
SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 



Manchester- 
Ward 11 . 



Totals 





h 




O «! 

to Oj 






w£ 


£« 


bg 


fcs 




.a 


'5 ft 


r£ 


•2S 


nfi 




<i 


»-5 


fi 




6 


150 


22 


260 


373 




rig 






14 
436 



306 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



NINETEENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 



Manchester — 
Ward 12 .. 









m 




bog 




P) fi 








*% e 


fe-3 


®^1 




pqo 


a a 





<£> c« 




fig 


^3 




a „ 


Pi - 


CB . 


£ ft 


•a a 


73 <B 


a® 


2Ph 


>»fl 


o 


o 


191 


50 



NINETEENTH 
SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

— Concluded. 



Manchester- 
Ward 13 



Totals 





Bo 






AS 


^ 




pt * 


pi r 


<d r 


£ ft 


•a a 


" » 


Q, 05 


2« 


^Q 


o 


O 


193 


59 


384 


| 109 







-4 








A 
























t-t 








*H 




















TWENTIETH 


M 


£§ 


pi 
as 


TWENTIETH 




£j 


03 


SENATORIAL 






w to 


SENATORIAL 




^a 


«"i 


DISTRICT. 


Wfc 


el "5 


DISTRICT. 


Kg 








a 


PQ o 


—Concluded. 


.£ 


P3* 




a 








a . 


W£ 






2 ft 


r3 ft 


«i 




o • 
o ft 




n a 




'4& 


53 o> 
piaj 


■So 

1-3 




v2Ph 


+3 © 


go 


Farmington 


172 


97 


12 


Somersworth — 










13 
139 


"8 


11 
8 


Ward 1 


25 
45 


25 
7 


33 




Ward 2 


62 


New Durham 

Rochester — 


11 


2 


9 


Ward 3 


20 


13 


39 








Ward 4 


3 


5 


112 




71 
37 
68 


47 
32 
24 


20 

23 
8 


Ward 5 

Strafford 


5 
65 


4 
11 


51 


Ward 2 


10 








44 
52 


30 

37 


39 

7 


Totals 


862 


374 


454 


Ward 5 




Ward 6 


92 


32 


10 




" 







NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



307 



WENTY- 
FIRST 
NATORIAL 
ISTRICT. 



rigton 
r — 

ird 1 . 

ird 2 . 

ird 3 . 

ird 4 . 

ird 5 . 


























o 




























u 


60 


*G 


CD 




CO 

> 


CO 




CO fH 

c3 CO 




g> 


tf > 


<->K 




x& 




E4« 


* fl 




© . 


© . 








bo . 


fan • 

u ft 


*£ 


sa 




o © 


o © 


> "i 


O/S 




co oi 


©ft 


M« 


oft 




C 


O 


<J 


m 




34 


70 


46 


26 


1 


71 


138 


132 


17 


? 


37 


180 


46 


36 


1 


81 


78 


100 


17 




80 


89 


130 


32 




3 


1 


1 


98 





TWENTY- 
FIRST 
SENATORIAL 
DISTRICT. 
—Concluded. 



Durham . . . 
Lee 

Madbury . . 
Rollinsford 

Totals . 



fe © 



. o 




© . 


© . 


bfl • 


60 • 


*H ft 




o <c 


o 0/ 


CO Q3 


©(£ 


O 


ci? 



338 



643 



o 



497 



sE 






320 

















(A 










7ENTY- 
SCOND 

3ENA- 

DRIAL 

DIS- 


u 


3 * 

V CO 


CO 


CO. 

id 

c 

CO j* 


bo 

CO 


TWENTY- 
SECOND 
SENA- 
TORIAL 
DIS- 


■d © 

o c 

CO O 


o s 


CO 


M 

CO 

C 
02 >» 


bio 

c 


RICT. 


S3 


W fi 


<fi 


«fl 


X* 


TRICT. 

—Con- 


%z 


ffl B 


<& 


*& 


* fi 




|ft 




o © 
©Oh 




ft 
8 


cluded. 




tf 

$* 


CO . 
60 • 
U ft 

o » 

cooi 


^ft 

"S © 




irn 


25 


8 


1 


10 


Northwood . . 


1 


36 


1 


1 


7 


ia 


10 


75 


1 


6 


23 


Nottingham . 


10 


41 


5 


8 


12 


ter 


23 


13 


6 


22 




Pelham 


6 


1 





4 


11 


field ... 


10 


61 




5 


18 


Raymond . . . 


5 


20 


1 


2 


35 


y 


109 


21 


60 


222 


89 


Salem 


14 


33 


72 


31 


11 


son 


78 


4 


12 


3 


6 


Windham . . . 


25 


3 


2 


11 


5 


lfield ... 


18 


1 


2 


1 


7 
























onderry 


164 


14 


3 


40 


12 


Totals ... 


583 


476 


202 


461 


392 


Chester— 
























ird 6 ... 


85 


145 


36 


95 


148 















308 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 









fl 








a 






m 


o 






CQ* 


o 






g 


3$ 






el 


a t* 


TWENTY- 
THIRD 
SENATORIAL 
DISTRICT. 




o © 


"3 g 

M 


TWENTY- 
THIRD 
SENATORIAL 
DISTRICT. 


6^ 


o © 


"3 E 
P«5 




5«2 


<»fl 


H 


— Concluded. 


5°2 


Qjfi 


PS 




U 


© 


S - 




u 


© 


8 . 




o « 

£d 


c3 r 
2 ft 


;^2 




£d 


pi : 


~8 






















.3 OS 


2 

7 








P 




5 
9 
4 


16 
45 
85 




3 

18 
10 
13 


34 

18 
29 
14 


30 






7 






fi 






7 


Epping 


12 


25 


83 




13 


31 


5 


114 
8 
8 

86 
51 


295 
33 
68 
58 
37 


25 
6 
7 
8 
3 




5 

131 

5 


12 
8 
6 


5 






20 


Hampstead 


South Hampton 


1 


Hampton 

Hampton Falls 


Totals 


506 


841 


242 


9 


12 


6 



















A 






A 




„,£ 






.rfl 













*"£ 


2 


TWENTY-FOURTH 


© P 


o 

a 


TWENTY-FOURTH 


© 


o 

a 

GO 


SENATORIAL 


03 § 

o I 


SENATORIAL 




DISTRICT. 


»t! 


DISTRICT. 


©"£ 




^ 

-f 1 ! 


bli o 

«3q_, 


—Concluded. 


^ 


&* 




s 


„ 




a 


- - 




o3 r 


.a a 




^d 

a © 


.5 ® 




g« 


6 Q 




jE« 


a p 




72 
6 
2 


2 

10 
5 


Portsmouth- 
Ward 4 


77 
68 






ii 




Ward 5 


5 




66 


54 


Rye 


19 
23 


13 


Portsmouth — 


Stratham 


2 


Ward 1 

Ward 2 


99 

258 

30 


4 
39 
40 


Totals 


720 


185 


Ward 3 







NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 
REPUBLICAN PARTY. 



309 



Sheriff. 



ROCKINGHAM 
COUNTY. 



Atkinson 

Auburn 

Brentwood 

Candia 

Chester 

Danville 

Deerfield 

Derry 

East Kingston . 

Epping 

Exeter 

Fremont 

Greenland 

Hampstead 

Hampton 

Hampton Falls . 

Kensington 

Kingston 

Londonderry ... 

Newcastle 

Newfields 

Newington 

Newmarket 

Newton 

North Hampton 

Northwood 

Nottingham 

Plaistow 

Portsmouth — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Raymond 

Rye 

Salem 

Sandown 

Seabrook 

South Hampton 

Stratham 

Windham 



St 

>, o 



Totals 



21 
39 
53 
90 
52 
79 
61 

346 
14 
35 

414 
38 
93 
69 

137 
75 
18 
33 

181 
7 
35 
2 
65 
37 
29 
39 
67 
40 

101 

284 
42 
81 
71 
32 
20 

144 
14 

104 
11 
23 
36 



Solicitor. 



Treasurer. 



«3 



3,135 



10 

is 
22 
26 
14 
24 
30 
110 
2 
22 
76 
13 
92 
20 
61 
44 
5 



7 
11 

3 
30 
10 
20 
22 
28 
13 

105 

273 

41 

7ft 

58 

15 

21 

56 

7 

67 

9 

10 

23 



W 

il 

— ' M 



10 
27 
34 
70 

49 

57 

41 

259 

it; 

17 

408 

30 

3 

52 
79 
35 

i»; 

?,2 
81 

"27 

"47 
28 
8 
16 
43 
27 

5 
26 



11 
17 

1 

109 

10 

63 

1 
21 
15 



F4S 

3 



£ ° 
3fc 



106 

277 

39 

79 

66 

6 
15 
45 

5 
28 

5 



1,598 



1,799 



1,425 



i* 



u 
21 

26 
67 
32 
53 
31 
264 
16 
16 
397 
31 
16 
34 
68 
64 
18 
25 
62 

1 
24 

1 

61 
34 

7 
20 
44 
32 

3 

17 
1 
3 
2 

21 

5 

101 

10 

75 

5 

21 

15 



1.745 



310 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 





Register 


Register 










of Deeds. 


of Probate. 


Commissioners. 




© 
© 




©* 


©" 


1 
© 


ROCKINGHAM 


© 




© 




c 


COUNTY. 




■** 


W J 


<s 


P 


—Concluded. 


< 


o 




O 








02 


Kg 


<j . 


M . 






u 


tf S 


© © 


B ® 




+i 






bc-^ 


a m 




cd * 




gs 


u <B 


a © 




M x 


rO « 


O K 


S^ 




»-3 


oh 


ocl. 


©63 


^ 




22 


21 


17 


17 


20 


Auburn 


35 


38 


40 


40 


43 


Brentwood 


55 


51 


52 


48 


50 




79 

58 
80 


78 
59 
75 


71 
55 
68 


77 
53 
69 


90 




56 


Danville 


74 


Deerfield 


57 


60 


61 


56 


58 




317 
17 


308 
16 


293 
15 


298 
15 


354 


East Kingston 


15 


Epping 


34 


35 


35 


32 


36 


Exeter 


450 


426 


385 


428 


385 


Fremont 


35 


39 


32 


32 


36 


Greenland 


69 


67 


78 


64 


66 


Hampstead 


63 


60 


54 


56 


67 




112 


117 


110 


105 


97 


Hampton Falls 


79 


76 


69 


73 


67 


Kensington 


21 


16 


19 


19 


18 


Kingston 


36 


30 


30 


30 


29 


Londonderry 


183 


192 


166 


157 


173 




6 

36 


6 
36 


4 
31 


5 
35 


5 


Newfields 


31 




2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Newmarket 


68 


65 


65 


60 


69 




36 

27 


34 

27 


23 

28 


34 
23 


30 


North Hampton 


26 


Northwood 


36 


35 


39 


32 


34 


Nottingham 


65 


64 


63 


58 


59 


Plaistow 


44 


40 


36 


32 


33 


Portsmouth- 












Ward 1 


75 
242 


75 
232 


100 
268 


82 
225 


74 


Ward 2 


229 


Ward 3 


30 


29 


32 


27 


27 


Ward 4 


57 
45 


51 
40 


73 

56 


57 
44 


60 


Ward 5 


43 


Raymond 


29 


28 


28 


28 


27 


Rye 


19 
134 

14 


18 

126 

13 


21 

121 

16 


17 
115 
17 


19 




120 


Sandown 


18 


Seabrook 


88 


92 


58 


55 


59 


South Hampton 


10 


10 


9 


9 


9 


Stratham 


29 


26 


26 


27 


26 




36 


34 


32 


35 


31 






Totals 


2,930 


2,847 


2,781 


2,685 


2,765 







NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL 



311 



STRAFFORD 
COUNTY. 



Barrington . . 
Dover — 

Ward 1 ... 

Ward 2 ... 

Ward 3 ... 

Ward 4 ... 

Ward 5 ... 

Durham 

Farmington . 

Lee 

Madbury 

Middleton ... 

Milton 

New Durham 
Rochester- 



Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 
Rollinsford 
Somersworth- 

Ward 1 ... 

Ward 2 ... 

Ward 3 .. 

Ward 4 

Ward R 
Strafford . . . 



So- 

Sheriff. licitor. 






Totals 



135 

323 
248 
256 
310 
5 

69 
250 
20 
30 
12 
133 
11 

121 
73 
92 
74 
96 

123 
37 

44 

46 
34 



73 



2.631 









138 

292 

222 

225 

279 

4 

60 

232 

14 

24 

11 

124 

12 

105 
62 
89 
58 
75 

114 
34 

40 
43 
31 
8 
7 
68 



2,371 



Treas- 
urer. 



138 

294 

224 

241 

286 

5 

63 

238 

20 

27 

13 

116 

11 

104 
65 
88 

<;•; 

76 

115 

35 

45 
45 
31 



Register 
of Deeds. 






2,431 



18 

102 
49 
24 
64 

*12 
85 
1 
9 
4 
14 
1 

39 
10 

5 
18 

8 
16 

1 



S= > 



522 



be © 

u > 
o o 



67 

177 

125 

205 

171 

3 

37 

82 

13 

14 

1 

54 
3 

16 
10 
54 
18 
23 
66 
21 

27 
28 
15 
4 
4 
33 



1,271 



312 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 














of Probate. 




Commissioners. 






rt 




£ 




a 




















u 


u 


CO 




m 


60 


STRAFFORD 
COUNTY 


3 


© 

eg 

PQ 




-*> 


m 
* 


S3 

1=1 
o 


— Concluded. 


H o 


si 


o 

At 

u 


02 

£5 


■as 


ri-s 

S <3 




ps 


otf 


^ M 


Sq 


•xw 


«M 






w 


^ 


© 


t-s 




141 


89 


18 


107 


119 


81 


Dover- 














Ward 1 


310 


236 


141 


243 


93 


159 


Ward 2 


220 
246 
279 


190 
190 

209 


107 
97 
118 


178 
199 
254 


62 
85 
86 


107 


Ward 3 


122 


Ward 4 


149 


Ward 5 


4 


4 




3 


2 


2 




64 

240 


41 
122 


ii 

58 


53 
181 


20 
125 


42 


Farmington 


179 




22 
29 


16 
20 


6 
13 


7 
23 


9 
13 


13 


Madbury 


17 


Middleton 


11 


5 


1 


9 


2 


8 




125 
13 


71 
10 


52 
1 


57 
9 


42 
5 


110 


New Durham 


10 


Rochester — 














Ward 1 


113 


44 


48 


61 


40 


100 


Ward 2 


66 


27 


12 


39 


31 


74 


Ward 3 


84 
66 


46 
16 


17 
23 


67 
37 


26 
40 


82 


Ward 4 


79 


Ward 5 


84 


30 


27 


40 


51 


90 


Ward 6 


120 

36 


60 
30 


25 
9 


63 
30 


65 
9 


141 




27 


Somersworth— 




Ward 1 


51 


25 


51 


16 


15 


34 


Ward 2 


50 


14 


54 


11 


16 


9 


Ward 3 


32 


24 


32 


12 


4 


13 


Ward 4 


8 


4 


8 


3 


2 


6 


Ward 5 


8 


2 


7 


5 


4 


2 


Strafford 


69 


36 
1,561 


20 
956 


44 


67 


38 


Totals 


2,491 


1,751 


1,033 


1,694 







NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



313 











Register 






So- 


Treas- 


of 


- 


Sheriff. 


licitor. 


urer. 


Deeds. 


BELKNAP 


o 


o 




Hayford, 


60 


COUNTY. 


ft 




*3 


co 


H 2 




■Si 


-fl . 


W 


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PM 08 


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S3 3 


^ 






|§ 


£ § 


« o 


£* 








a? 03 




f* ep 




s^ 


® J 


-J 


*h] 


£& 




Ph 


J 


h 


o 


w 




23 

24 
38 


19 
17 
14 


37 
36 
50 


35 
33 

47 


34 




41 


Belmont 


48 




14 

28 


8 
14 


21 
40 


20 
36 


22 


Gilford 


40 




32 


37 


64 


61 


62 


Laconia — 




Ward 1 


30 
93 


19 
23 


48 

101 


43 

98 


44 


Ward 2 


95 


Ward 3 


44 

73 

84 

105 


29 
50 
44 
47 


70 
115 
120 

147 


67 
107 
114 
137 


64 


Ward 4 


110 


Ward 5 


114 


Ward 6 


140 


Meredith 


33 


22 


51 


46 


51 


New Hampton 


17 


10 


24 


26 


29 


Sanbornton 


25 


22 


44 


44 


45 


Tilton 


19 


43 


60 


59 


57 






Totals 


682 


418 


1,028 


973 


996 







314 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 












of Probate. 




Commissioners. 










CO 




m 


















BELKNAP 


3 


£ 


M 


as 


4) 


o3 


COUNTY. 


M 


h 


. 


Ph 


£ 


* 


— Concluded. 






Wg 


02 


-; d 




§*a 

a « 

O £3 




si 

5^ 


® 5 


o 

© o 




Eh 


fe 


ft 


<i 


CQ 




33 

27 


25 
38 


7 
9 


23 

20 


26 
19 


24 


Barnstead 


21 




43 
19 


20 
9 


26 
9 


33 

15 


42 
16 


26 


Center Harbor 


14 


€rilf ord 


39 
61 


3 
43 


10 
20 


33 
41 


35 
57 


24 


Gilmanton 


36 


Laconia — 














Ward 1 


38 

99 

68 

115 

113 

135 

44 

23 

38 


10 
29 
16 
52 
30 
65 
12 
13 
5 


16 
54 
22 
42 
57 
46 
19 
10 
44 


33 
78 
52 
94 
90 
126 
38 
17 
38 


45 
59 
60 
70 
82 
100 
34 
23 
40 


29 


Ward 2 


46 


Ward 3 


40 


Ward 4 


64 


Ward 5 


55 


Ward 6 


72 




35 




14 


Sanbornton 


9 


Tilton 


62 


7 


33 


47 


35 


55 






Totals 


957 


377 


424 


778 


743 


564 







NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



315 



CARROLL 
COUNTY. 



Albany 

Bartlett 

Brookfield 

Chatham 

Conway 

Eaton 

Effingham 

Freedom 

Hart's Location 

Jackson 

Madison 

Moultonborough. 

Ossipee 

Sandwich 

Tamworth 

Tuf tonboro 

Wakefield 

Wolf eboro 

Totals 



Sheriff. 



W 



6 

72 

14 

13 

28 

1 

8 

22 

155 

77 

41 

75 

30 

55 

95 



716 



Solicitor. 



W 

w 



14 
11 
31 
2 
11 
22 
154 
83 
45 
70 
30 
47 
94 



738 



Treasurer. 



2^ 



11 

6 

SO 
14 
12 
29 
2 
11 
23 
152 
77 
45 
92 
30 
57 



Register 
of Probate. 



a: 



756 






11 

5 
57 
11 
11 

"2 

7 
16 
175 
73 
40 
67 
30 
50 



651 



316 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 










of Deeds. 


Commissioners. 






*ti 










03 




^ 




a 


A . 






CARROLL 


03 

a 


Pi fac 


d 




COUNTY. 




ee 


•g 


A 


— Concluded. 


03 


o 










-*•§ 


.a 


«* 




03 ® 


o 
w3 


Pi a> 


c3 

5 rt 




m W 


o © 


■3 * 


S o 




r ^O 


£^ 




6© 




ft 


O^ 


l-a 


«i 


Albany 


8 


8 


8 


8 


Bartlett 


8 


9 


8 


9 




10 

7 


11 
6 


11 
6 


11 


Chatham 


7 


Conway 


99 


87 


85 


90 




14 

12 


11 
13 


11 
13 


14 




13 




30 
2 


28 
2 


32 
2 


28 


Hart's Location 


2 




13 

23 

152 


11 

21 

161 


11 

21 

152 


13 




21 




154 




83 


80 


79 


79 




43 

87 
30 
60 
94 


43 
79 
32 
55 
80 


36 
70 
30 
49 
88 


36 




76 




30 


Wakefield 


36 




88 






Totals 


775 


737 


712 


715 







NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



317 













Register 
of 




Sheriff. 


Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 


Deeds. 




A 


>> 








MERRIMACK 


."£ 


A 


+? 


ta 


u 


COUNTY. 


s 


H 


o 


> 
03 


ffl 




** 


^ 




R 


w . 




go 


gs 


go 






,2 « 


03 £> 




>»a 


3 « 




u ti 


£ pf 


£ <=! 


J-" c3 


l § 




C8 O 




5 ° 


H *H 




6^ 


£° 


^ 


w h 


go 


Allenstown 


22 


19 


11 


11 


21 


Andover 


23 


22 


8 


15 


24 




25 
54 
25 
33 


25 
48 
24 
31 


16 
24 
17 
14 


10 

23 

7 

21 


25 




49 


Bradford 


24 


Canterbury 


36 




41 


39 


28 


11 


39 


Concord — 




Ward 1 


72 


70 


51 


22 


72 


Ward 2 


20 


18 


18 


4 


22 


Ward 3 


73 


70 


47 


25 


76 


Ward 4 


240 


203 


169 


46 


226 


Ward 5 


205 


186 


115 


82 


195 


Ward 6 


209 


185 


125 


76 


205 


Ward 7 


263 


232 


116 


131 


249 


Ward 8 


30 


21 


19 


8 


26 


Ward 9 


34 


32 


18 


16 


37 


Danbury 


45 


43 


18 


24 


46 


Dunbarton 


24 


24 


8 


12 


24 


Epsom 


58 


54 


29 


19 


57 


Franklin — 










Ward 1 


105 


97 


18 


90 


101 


Ward 2 


55 


.49 


16 


48 


52 


Ward 3 


157 


150 


29 


156 


147 


Henniker 


33 


35 


17 


17 


38 


Hill 


31 


30 


10 


23 
25 


33 
45 


Hooksett 


40 


38 


21 


Hopkinton 


64 


62 


13 


50 


64 


Loudon 


70 


61 


26 


36 


66 


Newbury 


16 


15 


11 


4 


17 


New London 


29 


27 


11 


16 


29 

38 


Northfield 


38 


34 


5 


32 


Pembroke 


50 
168 


49 
153 


19 
74 


32 
79 


47 
148 

27 


Pittsfield 


Salisbury 


25 


23 


6 


19 


Sutton 


18 


15 


9 


6 


17 


Warner 


83 

24 


79 
22 


41 
19 


30 
7 


79 
25 


Webster 


Wilmot ., 


24 


24 


7 


15 


24 




Totals 


2,526 


2,309 


1,203 


1,248 


2,450 





318 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



MERRIMACK 

COUNTY. 
—Concluded. 



Register 

of 
Probate. 






Commissioners. 



3 Q 



q cs 



S.S 



Is 



OS 



Allenstown . 
Andover 
Boscawen . . . 

Bow 

Bradford . . . 
Canterbury- 
Chichester . . 
Concord — 

Ward 1 ... 

Ward 2 ... 

Ward 3 ... 

Ward 4 ... 

Ward 5 ... 

Ward 6 ... 

Ward 7 ... 

Ward 8 ... 

Ward 9 ... 
Danbury . . . 
Bunbarton . . 

Epsom 

Franklin — 

Ward 1 ... 

Ward 2 ... 

Ward 3 ... 
Henniker . . . 

Hill 

Hooksett ... 
Hopkinton . 

Loudon 

Newbury 
New London 
Northfield . . 
Pembroke . . 
Pittsfield ... 
Salisbury . . . 

Sutton 

Warner 

Webster .... 
Wilmot 

Totals . . 



21 
23 
27 
49 
24 
34 
40 

63 

20 

74 

218 

195 

193 

236 

23 

37 

42 

24 

53 



59 
144 
36 
35 
39 
66 
57 
17 
28 
38 
47 
139 
27 
16 
78 
21 
25 



23 
22 
47 
23 
24 
32 

64 

20 

72 

195 

184 

187 

226 

14 

38 

34 

20 

42 

58 
44 
93 
35 
31 
29 
49 
38 
13 
23 
22 
46 
88 
22 
16 
77 
15 
20 



15 
15 
17 
43 
24 
17 
31 

39 
11 
52 
108 
130 
124 
110 

"l8 
31 
15 
30 

45 
18 
65 
29 
15 
25 
48 
42 
11 
18 
26 
28 
91 
17 
20 
87 
17 
7 



17 
16 
15 
11 

7 
26 
11 

27 

7 

14 

93 

65 

97 

75 

7 

9 

21 

13 

14 

93 
63 
167 
11 
25 
30 
23 



11 
18 
15 
43 
17 
32 
32 

57 

17 

62 

193 

161 

118 

210 

26 

38 

28 

14 



50 
23 
80 
27 
13 
20 
44 
56 
11 
15 
20 
39 
98 
14 
17 
68 
16 
18 



2,357 



1,995 



1,439 



1,221 



1,770 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



319 











Register 




Sheriff. 


Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 


of Deeds. 


HILLSBOROUGH 


03 


bio 

B 

u 


<£ 


M 

CD 


*6 


COUNTY. 


oSrf 


&u 


'o 


o 




• -4-> 


m 


-2 


N 






^g 




W f> 




ti« 




<D*CJ 


tf § 


A 


H S 


2 




|5 


E! £ 
oft 


is 


•Sft 






& 


t-s 


< 


< 


o 




31 

112 

62 

16 


31 
110 
56 
16 


29 

111 

58 

14 


"36 

18 

5 






76 


Bedford 


46 


Bennington 


10 


Brookline 


19 


20 


19 




21 




1 




1 




1 




47 
153 


47 
144 


45 
149 


8 
37 


40 


Groffstown 


111 




19 
19 


19 
18 


19 

17 


3 


15 


G-reenville 


17 


Hancock 


16 


14 


16 


1 


15 




170 


171 


159 


34 


139 


Hollis 


65 
83 
20 


73 

87 
21 


62 
78 
20 


6 
8 
2 


75 




84 




18 


Lyndeborough 


27 


29 


28 


1 


26 


Manchester — 












Ward 1 


368 


335 


362 


152 


235 


Ward 2 


434 


406 


430 


219 


215 


Ward 3 


481 
364 
101 


442 
335 

80 


453 

342 
87 


221 
199 

64 


266 


Ward 4 


162 


Ward 5 


40 


Ward 6 


364 

77 


339 

71 


338 

79 


202 
76 


177 


Ward 7 


17 


Ward 8 


224 


211 


216 


140 


98 


Ward 9 


354 


328 


334 


172 


205 


Ward 10 


171 


165 


166 


84 


88 


Ward 11 


136 


130 


136 


71 


81 


Ward 12 


181 

177 


172 
160 


173 
171 


205 

227 


14 


Ward 13 


32 




13 

50 


14 

42 


13 
49 


"i.7 


16 


Merrimack 


39 




161 


164 


152 


26 


141 


Mont Vernon 


18 


19 


18 


3 


19 


Nashua- 












Ward 1 


180 


201 


164 


4 


214 


Ward 2 


119 


134 


114 


14 


128 


Ward 3 


26 
37 


31 

43 


28 
34 


12 
4 


18 


Ward 4 


41 


Ward 5 


14 


17 


16 


9 


11 


Ward 6 


43 
69 


61 

82 


40 

77 


16 
1 


53 


Ward 7 


77 


Ward 8 


78 
26 
42 


90 
33 
41 


78 
26 
42 


23 
30 

2 


80 


Ward 9 


15 




38 







320 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 











Register 




Sheriff. 


Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 


of Deeds. 




02 










HILLSBOROUGH 




bO 




©, 
> 


id 

o 


COUNTY. 


-w 






xa 


o 


—Continued. 




ft 


O 


£ 






rf'S 


IS 

3^ 


2"S 

la 






o 


i-s 


«l 


<1 


© 


New Ipswich 


39 


35 


35 


3 


41 




13 
49 


13 

49 


9 

49 


1 

1 


12 


Peterborough 


50 




5 
12 


3 

12 


4 
14 


1 
1 


4 




14 


Weare 


19 


18 


19 


5 


14 


Wilton 


37 
5 


38 
5 


35 
5 


3 

1 


36 


Windsor 


4 


Totals 


5,347 


5,172 


5,133 


2,367 


3,389 



NEW IIAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



321 





Register 












of 












Probate. 




Commissioners. 




HILLSBOROUGH 


ft 
ft 

o 




£ 




A 


COUNTY. 


O 


f* 


<p 


§ 




—Continued. 


ha 


« s 


w 


w 


o 




■SfS 


EH. 
•♦J o 


Daniel F 
Nashua. 


James H. 
Nashua. 


O o3 


Amherst 


26 


26 


7 


29 


28 




116 
54 
16 


68 
58 
2 


58 
19 
13 


100 
41 
12 


92 


Bedford 


43 




14 




20 
1 


15 


9 


19 
1 


13 






Prancestown 


47 


44 


8 


40 


56 




140 
21 


123 
13 


46 
4 


129 
15 


129 


Greenfield 


13 




17 
16 


16 
10 


7 
7 


16 
12 


13 


Hancock 


12 


Hillsborough 


166 


111 


94 


106 


135 


Hollis 


72 
89 
20 


56 
71 
19 


13 

46 
10 


68 
86 

7 


54 




44 


Litchfield 


14 




29 


19 


10 


26 


20 


Manchester — 












Ward 1 


335 


330 


128 


306 


271 


Ward 2 


388 


405 


173 


352 


267 


Ward 3 


387 


439 


206 


300 


323 


Ward 4 


285 


324 


142 


257 


227 


Ward 5 


64 


82 


39 


56 


49 


"Ward 6 


364 

62 

185 


356 
76 
199 


116 
61 

80 


265 

37 

160 


276 


Ward 7 


45 


Ward 8 


158 


Ward 9 


283 
147 


327 

158 


130 

55 


249 
132 


233 


Ward 10 


95 


Ward 11 


117 


136 


59 


87 


97 


Ward 12 


145 


172 


90 


135 


102 


Ward 13 


132 


196 


99 


131 


86 




14 
45 


12 
36 


17 4 


14 

40 


13 


Merrimack 


29 




160 


125 


79 


126 


130 


Mont Vernon 


20 


13 


12 


14 


18 














Ward 1 


188 


148 


74 


221 


130 


Ward 2 


123 


89 


57 


139 


79 


Ward 3 


26 


18 


23 


30 


12 


Ward 4 


43 


22 


22 


40 


25 


Ward 5 


18 


12 


10 


19 


12 




64 

82 


42 
58 


49 
29 


70 
79 


30 


Ward 7 


55 


Ward 8 


85 


54 


53 


92 


49 


Ward 9 


27 
40 


20 
34 


33 
9 


37 
35 


11 


New Boston 


33 




35 


28 


9 


33 


28 







322 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 












of 












Probate. 




Commiss 


loners. 






a 










HILLSBOROUGH 


O 






c 

2 


A 

h 


COUNTY. 




m g 


W 


—Concluded. 


S«3 


• 05 




P 


(3 fl 




£§ 


PI o3 


p 03 


O 03 




s* 


3 g 


03 |z 








10 
50 


9 
36 


5 

12 


12 
45 


6 


Peterborough 


44 




5 
13 


5 

12 


2 
5 


4 
12 


4 




11 




18 

37 

3 


16 

30 

3 


4 

15 

1 


16 

26 

3 


18 


Wilton 


31 


Windsor 


2 


Totals 


4,850 


4,673 


2,253 


4,289 


3,679 







NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



323 



CHESHIRE 
COUNTY. 



Sheriff. 



-CM 



Alstead 

Chesterfield . 

Dublin 

Fitzwilliam . 

Gilsum 

Harrisville . . 

Hinsdale 

Jaffrey , 

Keene— 

Ward 1 ... 

Ward 2 ... 

Ward 3 ... 

Ward 4 ... 

Ward 5 ..., 
Marlborough 

Marlow 

Nelson 

Richmond . . . 

Rindge 

Roxbury 

Stoddard 

Sullivan 

Surry 

Swanzey 

Troy 

Walpole 

Westmoreland 
Winchester . . 

Totals . . . 



29 
19 
58 
18 
12 
10 
96 
37 

190 
143 
128 
60 
38 
13 



Solicitor. 






30 
19 
51 
19 
13 
9 
92 
38 

186 

140 

120 

64 

41 

13 

25 

11 

9 

63 

8 

16 

14 

23 

26 

40 

41 

64 

66 



Treasurer. 



3 

«8 5 



24 
1?) 
51 
19 
13 
9 
87 
38 

191 

111 

121 

61 

4?, 

13 



Register 

of 

Deeds. 



175 
146 
119 
51 
41 
13 
30 
10 



1,304 



1,241 



1,251 



1,229 



324 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 














of 














Probate. 




Commissioners. 






u 




S 


o 


1 


g 


CHESHIRE 


in 


xa 




o 


1 




03 


COUNTY. 


P4 


A 


1-3 . 


fc 


£ 


m 


—Concluded. 


« ! 


U 


o 




• 


O 03 


Frank A. 
Hinsdale. 


<x> 
i ° 

I* 

11 


16 


Fred A. S 
Nelson. 


o 

• rH 03 


Si <s 


Alstead 


24 


14 


3 


15 


Chesterfield 


8 


4 


13 


6 


8 


11 




34 
18 


21 

12 


25 
7 


15 


22 
7 


35 




17 


Gilsum 


11 


8 


5 


7 


4 


9 


Harrisville 


9 


4 


3 


1 


7 


7 




85 
38 


92 

25 


50 
21 


51 

17 


33 
15 


72 


Jaffrey 


20 


Keene — 














Ward 1 


158 


104 


50 


132 


63 


145 


Ward 2 


141 


68 


45 


93 


45 


109 


Ward 3 


105 

52 


65 
41 


55 
23 


89 
39 


36 
24 


88 


Ward 4 


51 


Ward 5 


39 


21 


18 


29 


13 


33 


Marlborough 


11 


4 


9 


7 


6 


10 




20 
10 


8 
7 


11 

2 


17 
7 


6 
8 


16 


Nelson 


7 


Richmond 


9 


3 


9 


2 


4 


9 


Rindge 


60 


34 


28 


28 


27 


36 


Roxbury 


6 


8 


3 


4 


3 


5 


Stoddard 


13 


4 


1 


9 


11 


13 


Sullivan 


12 


14 


5 


10 


5 


13 


Surry 


14 


15 


7 


10 


6 


18 


Swanzey 


22 


11 


20 


16 


9 


15 


Troy 


30 


16 


21 


26 


16 


21 




39 

58 
75 


32 

51 
50 


23 
36 
82 


21 

47 
41 


6 
30 
18 


32 




33 




46 






Totals 


1,101 


731 


583 


; 740 


435 


886 







NEW HAMPSHIKE MANUAL. 



325 



SULLIVAN 
COUNTY. 





Sheriff. 




Solicitor. 








d 


rt 






£ 




o 


o 


ti 


bfi 


o 




«3 




o 


.3 


cS 


>r» 


.d 


e3 


u 


a 


3 




O 





Treasurer. 



03 O 

3° 



Acworth 
Charlestown 
Claremont 
Cornish . . . 
Croydon . . . 

Goshen 

Grantham . 
Langdon . . 
Lempster . 
Newport . . 
Plainfield . 
Springfield 
Sunapee . . 

Unity 

Washington 

Totals . 



w« 



. 1=1 

si 

is 

I 5 






4 


8 


12 


36 


7 


27 


43 


17 


115 


21 


2 


8 


10 


1 


2 1 


4 


14 


3 ! 


5 


1 




6 




1 


17 






94 


191 


34 


7 




20 


25 




2 


5 


2 


9 


24 


1 


3 


3 


2 


3 


304 


246 


T-39 



21 
110 

26 
J 
4 

"*8 
3 

41 

2 

"s 

12 
5 



250 



22 
30 
117 
9 
5 
7 
3 

14 

155 
1 
7 
5 
22 
4 



404 



53 

169 

47 

3 

16 

*16 

5 

160 
28 
17 
16 
16 



560 



6 
36 
127 
35 

2 
14 

2 

6 

1 
62 
22 

1 
20 
17 

2 



353 



*g 



1° 



26 

67 
117 

14 
8 
7 
2 

11 

20 

242 

7 

23 
4 

22 



576 



326 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 


Register 












of 


of 












Deeds. 


Probate. 


Commissioners 






"3 
> 


tS 


d 


A 


02 










r*4 


«3 


PI 




SULLIVAN 





p. 

a 


«1 


o 


03 


to 
U 


COUNTY. 


ti 


M 


£ 


pq 


o3 


d 


—Concluded. 






pK| 


03 
PI 




to 2 


o 




_.d 

a.s 

3 H 


H^ 




"31 


5£ 

60 <D 


SI 1 
■si 


be a 


-1 

d « 




A*& 


^ft 


££ 


go 


©O 


£o 




o 


H 


ft 


o 


M 




32 

77 

238 

49 

12 


31 
69 
225 
46 
12 


25 
63 
178 
40 
11 


14 
45 
180 
45 
10 


22 

35 

103 

9 

8 


27 




62 




237 




47 


Croydon 


7 




25 
3 
18 


19 
4 
17 


20 
3 
14 


16 
1 
6 


12 
4 
9 


21 




4 




12 




21 


19 


16 


11 


10 


16 


Newport 


347 


337 


308 


206 


197 


268 


Plainfield 


29 
23 


27 
24 


25 
23 


23 
18 


8 
8 


27 




18 




23 


21 


18 


9 


13 


20 


Unity 


37 


33 


37 


28 


16 


30 




12 


11 


10 


5 


6 


11 






Totals 


946 


895 


791 


617 


460 


807 







NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



327 





Sheriff. 


Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 


Register 

of 

Deeds. 


GRAFTON 
COUNTY. 


g 

o 

M 

4) >» 
1-3 


Raymond U. Smith, 
Haverhill. 


-2 
W 

w 

u 


tS 
o 

s 

|s 




10 

43 
36 

4 
31 
33 
56 
77 
13 

1 
99 
12 
16 
15 
68 
2S2 

1 
62 

6 

149 

19 

81 

1 

8 
55 
30 

8 
23 
22 
95 
24 
15 
18 

8 
14 
21 


9 
44 
37 

4 
31 
31 
48 
73 
12 

1 
97 
12 
16 
11 
64 
300 

3 
59 

6 

154 

20 

84 

66 

2 

9 
62 
30 

9 
24 
22 
84 
21 
16 
22 

8 
12 
23 


9 
43 
37 

4 
31 
31 
44 
75 

x ? 

100 

12 

16 

10 

66 

276 

3 

56 

7 

"l8 
95 
68 

2 
15 
61 
27 

9 
25 
22 
86 
24 
12 
21 

8 
12 
23 


ll 




46 


Bath 


35 
3 






32 




35 




56 




75 
12 






1 


Enfield 


95 




12 




16 




16 




68 




283 




4 




63 




6 




151 
18 
85 








68 
2 




Lyman 

Lyme 

Monroe 


9 

61 
29 
10 


Orf ord 


23 
21 
99 


Piermont 




24 


Thornton 


13 

23 

g 






14 


Woodstock 


24 


Totals 


1,524 


1,526 


1,361 


1,551 



328 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 
of 

Probate. 










Coi 


umissioners. 










fl 






o 




o 

BO 


© 


GRAFTON 


5 


„ 


E 


g 


COUNTY. 


03 


o 


o 


| 


—Concluded. 


s 


Eh . 












^3 


pq^ 


H '~ 


w| 




Hi > 


^.s 




©r2 

bo3 













Alexandria 
Ashland . . 

Bath 

Benton ... 
Bethlehem 
Bristol ... 
Campton . 
Canaan . . . 
Dorchester 
Easton 
Enfield ... 
Pranconia 
Grafton . . 
Groton ... 
Hanover . 
Haverhill 
Hebron . . . 
Holderness 
Landaff . . 
Lebanon . . 
Lincoln . . . 
Lisbon ... 
Littleton . 
Livermore 
Lyman . . . 

Lyme 

Monroe . . 
Orange . . . 
Orf ord . . . 
Piermont 
Plymouth 
Rumney . . 
Thornton . 

Warren 

Waterville 
Wentworth 
Woodstock 

Totals 



47 



31 
35 
56 
76 
13 

1 
102 
12 
17 
11 
72 
307 

4 
58 

6 
152 
19 
84 
66 

2 
11 
63 
31 
10 
26 
21 
89 
22 
13 
24 

8 

14 
23 



1,577 



17 


17 


76 


76 


59 


60 


2 


2 


6 


6 


61 


64 


27 


27 


9 


9 


25 


26 


24 


26 


86 


82 


22 


24 


14 


14 


22 


23 


8 


8 


11 


14 


20 


20 



10 


10 


43 


43 


37 


36 


2 


2 



3 
58 

4 

138 

20 

77 

65 

2 

9 



1,459 



1,460 



1,460 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



329 



COOS 
COUNTY. 



Sheriff. 



MS 

u u 
o <o 

OS 03 

C3 W 






Solicitor. 



Treas- 
urer. 






fil 

Hi 



. o 

si 

oO 



Berlin- 
Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 


89 

124 

228 

58 

12 

3 

116 

38 

26 

7 

13 

24 

19 

95 

7 

50 

36 

'"3 

7 

89 

6 

"72 


13 

34 

15 

2 

9 

*46 
24 
4 

"6 
120 

9 

97 
27 
10 
13 

6 
27 

1 

5 
11 

3 
60 

542 


23 
37 
63 
13 

7 

'l2 

21 

26 

2 

*36 

9 

170 

14 

18 

8 

5 

8 

6 

5 

14 

103 


32 
22 
28 
15 
1 

*89 

14 

2 

3 

14 

10 

6 

5 

4 

14 

3 

"3 

2 
2 
2 
2 
14 


14 
53 

83 
22 
10 

3 

70 
34 

3 

"4 
33 
10 
32 
12 
23 
54 

is 

166 
1 

'17 


"i 


Ward 4 




Clarksville 

Colebrook 


"55 






Dummer 

Errol 










.... 






Milan 

Northumberland 

Pittsburg 

Randolph 


— 
— 

.... 


Stark 




Stewartstown 

Stratford 

Wentworth's Location... 
Whitefield 

Totals 


2 


i 1,122 

1 


600 


287 


593 


58 







330 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



COOS 
COUNTY. 
-Concluded. 



Berlin — • 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Carroll 

Clarksville 

Colebrook 

Columbia 

Dalton 

Dummer 

Errol 

Gorham 

Jefferson 

Lancaster 

Milan 

Northumberland 

Pittsburg 

Randolph 

Shelburne 

Stark 

Stewartstown 

Stratford 

Wentworth's Location 
Whitefield 



Totals 



Register 

of 
Deeds. 



ft 

K 

Spq 

o 



77 
126 
144 

45 
2 



561 



SdOfH 

> cS 

osJ3 



22 
26 
52 

6 
17 

3 

141 

63 

28 

5 

8 
54 
22 
157 
28 
49 
52 

4 



14 
113 



Register 

of 
Probate. 



Commissioners. 



X/l U 



H3 (H 

35 



OS 



ml 






63 

93 

113 

40 

16 

3 

146 

55 

35 

6 

6 

71 

27 

200 

30 

48 

47 

4 



73 

17 

1 

110 



1,237 



70 



546 



76 
94 

"i3 

3 

142 

62 

20 

3 
10 
53 
20 
174 
25 
38 
53 

2 
24 

7 

104 

14 

2 
92 



1,080 






29 
82 
99 
27 
16 

2 

138 

50 

31 

3 

4 
58 
22 
160 
22 
41 
39 

3 
23 

8 
61 
15 

2 
124 



1,059 



87 

141 

162 

51 

13 

1 

131 

49 

23 

5 

10 

72 

15 

135 

29 

41 

32 

3 

23 

5 

76 



1,211 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 
DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



331 



1 








Register 


1 








of 




Sheriff. 


Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 


Deeds. 




a 










a 


h 


„ 






t-< 


© 






ROCKINGHAM 


a 


a 


-2a 


Fh 


COUNTY. 


o . 


w . 


S o 


N 




VIA 


A 


be 


o 




a 


^.a 
a" 2 




©5 

Is 






a => 


£ c3 


« a 




oP-i 


02 


OH 


gn 



Atkinson 

Auburn 

Brentwood 

Candia 

Chester 

Danville 

Deerfield 

Derry 

East Kingston . . 

Epping 

Exeter 

Fremont 

Greenland 

Hampstead 

Hampton 

Hampton Falls . 

Kensington 

Kingston 

Londonderry 

Newcastle , 

Newfields 

Newington 

Newmarket 

Newton , 

North Hampton 

Northwood 

Nottingham 

Plaistow 

Portsmouth — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Raymond 

Rye ■. 

Salem 

Sandown 

Seabrook 

South Hampton 

Stratham 

Windham 



25 



2 


2 


7 


7 


8 


9 


2 


3 


6 


6 


27 


28 


14 


14 


10 


11 


7 


7 


4 


5 


53 


54 


3 


6 


10 


9 


6 


8 


13 


12 


5 


5 


12 


13 


39 


28 


35 


38 


10 


7 


6 


6 


33 




10 


10 


11 


11 


5 


5 


18 


21 


1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


3 



Totals 



641 



602 



30 



332 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 








of 








Probate. 


Commissioners. 






£ 








.4 










+s 




















c3 


o 




ROCKINGHAM 


£ 




esc 


COUNTY. 


0) 


3 


A. Pr 
gton. 


—Concluded. 


*1 






0,1 






5-3 


o o 


o» ] 




o02 


•S^ 


®M T 




i-s 


«£ 


$ 


i" 



CQ 

Is 



Atkinson 

Auburn 

Brentwood 

Candia 

Chester 

Danville 

Deerfield 

Derry 

East Kingston . 

Epping 

Exeter 

Fremont 

Greenland 

Hampstead 

Hampton 

Hampton Falls 

Kensington 

Kingston 

Londonderry ... 

Newcastle 

Newfields 

Newington 

Newmarket 

Newton 

North Hampton 

Northwood 

Nottingham 

Plaistow 

Portsmouth- 
Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Raymond 

Rye 

Salem 

Sandown 

Seabrook 

South Hampton 

Stratham 

Windham 

Totals 



1 
7 

6 
24 

"2 
23 

70 
16 

77 

18 
6 
1 
7 
8 
3 
5 

26 

14 
9 
7 
5 

51 
3 

10 
7 

10 
4 

12 

30 

39 

8 

6 

31 

8 

7 

5 

18 

1 

3 



594 



595 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



333 



Sheriff. 



Solicitor. 



Treasurer. 



STRAFFORD 
COUNTY. 



ft 

■5 ° 



a ° 

1-3 



«s 



Barrington . . 
Dover — 

Ward 1 .... 

Ward 2 .... 

Ward 3 .... 

Ward 4 .... 

Ward 5 .... 

Durham 

Farmington . 

Lee 

Madbury 

Middleton ... 

Milton 

New Durham 
Rochester — 

Ward 1 .... 

Ward 2 .... 

Ward 3 .... 

Ward 4 .... 

Ward 5 .... 

Ward 6 .... 
Rollinsford . 
Somersworth- 

Ward 1 .... 

Ward 2 .... 

Ward 3 .... 

Ward 4 .... 

Ward 5 .... 
Strafford .... 

Totals ... 



2:> 



16 


16 


36 


36 


15 


16 


29 


28 


99 


97 


8 


7 


12 


12 


21 


18 


11 


9 


11 


11 


11 


9 


10 


9 


19 


17 


23 


22 


8 


7 


36 


34 


6 


7 


9 


8 


52 


55 


, 35 


35 


61 


61 


39 


42 


112 


112 


50 


50 


9 


11 



760 



754 



7 

10 
58 

36 
63 
43 
112 
51 



765 



334 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



STRAFFORD 

COUNTY. 
—Concluded. 



Register 








of Deeds. 


Commissioners 




rt 


| 






o 








an 














>> 


a o 


gar J. Ham, 
ochester. 


arles E. Hoi 
urham. 




3# 


S« 


£fi 


^Q 


CQ 


H 


O 


fe H 





25 

14 
33 
17 
29 
92 

7 
12 
20 
11 
11 

8 
10 

18 
23 

9 
35 

7 
13 
56 

34 
59 
40 
108 
51 
9 


25 

14 
34 
16 
28 
100 

7 
10 
21 

9 
11 
11 
10 

18 
26 

9 
42 

7 
12 
51 

36 
58 
35 
112 
50 
10 


25 

14 
35 
16 
27 
100 
7 
11 
18 
11 
11 
10 
10 

15 
25 

9 
35 

5 
10 
51 

35 
59 
37 
105 
53 
9 


24 


Dover — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Durham 

Farmington 

Lee 

Madbury 


16 
37 

17 
29 
109 
8 
10 
21 
11 
11 




10 


New Durham 

Rochester — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 


10 

14 

24 


Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 


8 
36 

5 
11 




55 


Somersworth — 
Ward 1 


35 


Ward 2 

Ward 3 


60 

38 


Ward 4 


106 


Ward 5 


53 
9 






Totals , 


751 


762 


743 


767 



NOTE— There was no candidate for Register of Probate and William W. 
Martin, r., having received five votes, was nominated. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



335 



BELKNAP 
COUNTY. 



Alton 

Barnstead 

Belmont 

Center Harbor 

Gilford 

Gilmanton 

Laconia — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 

Meredith 

New Hampton 
Sanbornton . . . 
Tilton 



Totals 









Register 


Sheriff. 


Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 


of Deeds. 




tS 








•V 








p) 






0? 


03 

a 


A 


o 










03 


O 


s 


03 




£ 


w 


m 


P5 a 

4 J 


Fortunat E 
Laconia. 


as 

6^ 


Herbert N. 
Laconia. 


16 


13 




15 


22 


22 




18 


11 


11 




11 


9 


8 




9 


7 


5 




6 


13 


11 




12 


26 


23 




23 


26 


28 


2 


27 


9 


9 




7 


15 


15 


5 


15 


16 


15 


.... 


17 


15 


12 


11 


14 


30 


27 




29 


5 


5 




5 


11 


10 




9 


32 


33 


20 


34 


263 


247 


38 


251 



336 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Register 
of Probate. 



Commission* 











pi 






S 


« 
el 


o 






03 


u 


Pi 


BELKNAP 


£3 


S 


,Q 


,3 


COUNTY. 


w 


Pi 


CO 


—Concluded. 


6 . 


M 


0Q 


O 




03 


S-d 


tie 


«8 




as 

O 03 


.2 h 
^) o 


_ o 

la 

H 


03 *2 

P! * 


Alton 




16 


16 


17 


Barnstead 




20 


19 


21 




"i 


12 
10 


10 
10 


13 


Center Harbor 


10 


Gilford 




8 


8 


8 


Grilmanton 




10 


8 


14 


Laconia — 










Ward 1 




24 


22 


29 


Ward 2 


l 


25 


25 


34 


Ward 3 


i 


8 


9 


9 


Ward 4 


2 


14 


14 


15 


Ward 5 


1 


16 


17 


17 


Ward 6 


2 


14 
29 


14 
29 


15 


Meredith 


30 






6 


6 


5 


Sanbornton 




11 


10 


12 


Tilton 




31 


32 


34 






Totals 


8 1 


254 


249 


283 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



33' 



Sheriff. 



Solicitor. 



Register 
Treasurer, of Deeds. 



CARROLL 

COUNTY. 







M 




© 




c 

03 


sa 





IS 


£* 


£2 


*8 


q <o 


•=i 9 


~ eS 


5 V 


W 






ha. W 
^ ft 



Albany j 6 

Bartlett 23 

Brookfield 3 

Chatham | 8 

Conway 29 

Eaton ! 12 

Effingham ; 5 

Freedom 1 30 

Hart's Location ■, 2 

Jackson 18 

Madison | 3 

Moultonborough I 7 

Ossipee I 22 

Sandwich 17 

Tamworth 19 

Tuftonboro 12 

Wakefield 24 

Wolfeboro 12 

Totals 252 



21 


12 


3 


3 


8 




28 


16 


12 


8 


5 


4 


28 


2 


2 


.... 


8 




3 


1 


8 


1 


24 


10 


14 


2 


13 


2 


12 


1 


26 


11 


12 


9 


230 


82 



204 



333 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 
of Probate. 




Commissioners. 


CARROLL 

COUNTY. 

—Concluded. 


03 

a 

si 


William A. Bixby, 
Wolfeboro. 


o 
u 

m 

§1 

go 


a 

a 
£ 

a 
.* 

1 


Albany 

Bartlett 


"ih 
.... 

*'l5 
6 
3 
1 

'"i 

"*9 

1 
1 
1 

7 
6 


3 

18 
3 
7 
27 
11 
5 

23 

2 

7 

3 

6 

21 

15 

12 

11 

21 

12 


2 
20 

2 

7 
27 
11 

5 
23 

2 
10 

3 

8 
24 
15 
13 
10 
22 
12 


"ii 




l 








17 




11 




4 




3 












1 




1 




8 




2 




1 




1 


Wakefield 


7 
7 






Totals 


67 


207 


216 


78 







NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



339 











Register 




Sheriff. 


Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 


of Deeds. 




+r 




















GQ 


CD 






MERRIMACK 


P4 








COUNTY. 




03 


M 


o 




^ 


GO 




£ • 




d-d 


k!^ 


■■d 


^TJ 






o 




^^ 




■ffg 


A ° 


"S pi 

■+J o 


t}£ 




<s^> 


oO 


cSQ 


££ 




w 


i-s 


Pn 


fc 



Allenstown . 
Andover .... 
Boscawen . . 

Bow 

Bradford . . . 
Canterbury 
Chichester . 
Concord — 

Ward 1 .. 

Ward 2 .. 

Ward 3 .. 

Ward 4 .. 

Ward 5 .. 

Ward 6 .. 

Ward 7 .. 

Ward 8 .. 

Ward 9 . . 
Danbury . . . 
Dunbarton . 

Epsom 

Franklin — 

Ward 1 .. 

Ward 2 .. 

Ward 3 .. 
Henniker . . 

Hill 

Hooksett . .. 
Hopkinton . 

Loudon 

Newbury . . . 
New London 
Northfield . . 
Pembroke . . 
Pittsfield ... 
Salisbury . . 

Sutton 

Warner 

Webster 

Wilmot 

Totals . . 



12 
19 

8 

7 
23 
23 

22 

69 
16 

30 
06 
32 
72 
28 
33 
4S 
19 
5 
2L 

10 

44 
47 
12 
4 
8 
24 
13 
42 
16 
10 
23 
57 
33 
12 
9 
15 



21 



65 
15 

32 
73 
38 
T5 
25 
34 
47 
18 
5 
22 

7 
43 
49 
11 

4 

2r, 
14 
41 
15 

10 



15 



941 



948 



938 



927 



340 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



MERRIMACK 

COUNTY. 
—Concluded. 



Allenstown 
Andover . . 
Boscawen 

Bow 

Bradford . 
Canterbury- 
Chichester 
Concord — 

Ward 1 . 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 
Danbury . . . 
Dunbarton . 

Epsom 

Franklin — 

Ward 1 .. 

Ward 2 .. 

Ward 3 .. 
Henniker . . . 

Hill 

Hooksett ... 
Hopkinton . 

Loudon 

Newbury . . . 
New London 
Northfield . . 
Pembroke . . 
Pittsfield ... 
Salisbury .. 

Sutton , 

Warner 

Webster .... 
Wilmot 



Register 
of Probate. 



Commissioners. 






12 






Totals 



914 



d 
d 



M3 



O M 

d&j 



65 



26 



892 



917 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



341 











Register 




Sheriff. 


Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 


of Deeds. 










i 












HILLSBOROUGH 


-« 
i* 


CD 


o 
o 


c3 


COUNTY. 


o 
A* 


O 
^ 


to . 

OS 


&u 




















•~5 W 




E5-S 


lvin J. 
Nashua 


nson G 
Manche 


amuel 

Manche 




t-s 


<5 


<\ 


02 



1 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
S 
9 
10 

11 
12 

13 

ci 

en 

1 

2 
.3 
4 
5 

6 

7 



3 


3 


2 


2 


18 


20 


19 


22 


13 


15 


14 


15 


3 


2 


2 


2 


8 


8 


9 


8 


18 


16 


16 


16 


1 


2 


2 


2 


42 


37 


42 


43 


10 


11 


11 


11 


11 


12 


11 


11 


11 


8 


9 


9 


22 


21 


21 


21 


3 


4 


3 


3 


5 


6 


6 


6 


8 


8 


8 


8 


7 


6 


6 


7 


39 


35 


40 


40 


39 


40 


41 


39 


60 


52 


51 


51 


54 


53 


57 


52 


334 


260 


259 


241 


148 


134 


139 


136 


332 


274 


253 


264 


141 


129 


121 


119 


39 


33 


32 


34 


63 


58 


63 


60 


138 


138 


132 


130 


44 


44 


46 


39 


61 


53 


51 


53 


6 


7 


5 


1 


7 


7 


8 


7 


12 


12 


12 


12 


5 


7 


6 


7 


26 


24 


22 


21 


23 


27 


20 


20 


87 


90 


83 


82 


24 


25 


20 


21 


26 


37 


22 


28 


34 


50 


33 


42 


71 


91 


65 


69 


114 


128 


101 


93 


75 


98 


73 


69 


15 


15 


15 


15 



342 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Sheriff. 


Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 


Register 
of Deeds. 


HILLSBOROUGH 

COUNTY. 
— Continued. 


id 
o 

©1 

la 

ha 


u 

'3 
P 

-HI 


n3 
o 
o 
bo 

rh © 

*1 


i 

o 

■8 

c3 

09 

Qa 

9 

t-J OQ 
0) 

<x> o 

s PI 

d 03 




4 
9 

14 
2 
2 
21 
25 


5 

10 
16 
2 
2 
21 
25 
2 


4 
9 

14 
2 
2 
20 
23 
1 


3 




10 




13 




2 




2 




19 


Wilton 


21 


Windsor 


2 


1 


Totals 


2,279 

1 


2,183 


2,026 


2,007 



NOTE — There was no candidate for Register of Probate and Samuel H. 
Connor of Manchester having received 67 votes, was nominated. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



343 



Commissioners 



HILLSBOROUGH 

COUNTY. 

—Continued. 



Amherst 

Antrim 

Bedford 

Bennington 

Brookline 

Deering 

Francestown 

Goff stown 

Greenfield 

Greenville 

Hancock 

Hillsborough 

Hollis 

Hudson 

Litchfield 

Lyndeborough 

Manchester — Ward 1 
Ward 2 
Ward 3 
Ward 4 
Ward 5 
Ward 6 
Ward 7 
Ward 8 
Ward 9 
Ward 10 
Ward 11 
Ward 12 
Ward 13 

Mason 

Merrimack 

Milford 

Mont Vernon 

Nashua— Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 

Ward 7 

Ward 8 

Ward 9 

New Boston 

New Ipswich 




344 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



HILLSBOROUGH 

COUNTY. 

— Concluded. 



Commissioners. 












2 






o< 






o 












J-H 






pQ 




n3 


03 




9 

o 


•"3 © 


® 
M 

a 


red W. 
Oreenfie! 


CD (0 

J-H (I) 

2-=* 

|5 


■3i2 

oM 


h 


Eh 


i-s 1 ^ 



Pelham 

Peterborough 

Sharon 

Temple 

"Weare 

Wilton 

Windsor 

Totals ... 



1,524 



1,676 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



345 



CHESHIRE 
COUNTY. 



Sheriff. 


Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 


Register 
of Deeds. 


>, 








9 








<X> 


•8 


. 


a 


ft 

02 


£ 


a 

OS 


£ 






TS 


a 


i-s 


hs 


<1 


3 


M 


Es 


M ® 


**s 


<S 


g (3 


rt 




<1 


.3 ® 


oM 





2:: 



Totals 



7 
1 
2 

16 
8 

20 
2 

17 

254 



8 
1 
2 

14 
9 

21 
3 

14 

232 



9 
1 
2 

15 
9 

16 
3 

14 

249 



7 

1 

2 

15 

10 

20 

3 

13 

242 



346 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



CHESHIRE 

COUNTY. 

—Concluded. 



Register 








of Probate. 


Commissioners 








1 





H 




1 < 

Eh 


5 


1 


to bfi 


ft 


A 


^2 


w 


d 


^i 


o 

3^ 


© d 


Sg 


98 


as 




•r-i <D 

<DKd 



Alstead 

Chesterfield . . 

Dublin 

Fitzwilliam . . 

Gilsum 

Harrisville . . . 

Hinsdale 

Jaffrey 

Keene — 

Ward 1 .... 

Ward 2 .... 

Ward 3 .... 

Ward 4 .... 

Ward 5 .... 
Marlborough . 

Marlow 

Nelson 

Richmond 

Rindge 

Stoddard 

Sullivan 

Surry 

Swanzey 

Troy 

Walpole 

Westmoreland 
Winchester ... 

Totals 



25 



234 



227 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL 



347 













Register 






i 


So- 


Treas- 


of 




Sheriff. 


licitor. 


urer. 


Deeds. 




a 








a 






to 


GO 






SULLIVAN 
COUNTY. 


O 




helli 




o 



O 

w 






• +; 


O 


W^ 






M+S 


W « 


j^ 


a 


t~5*i 




'd o 


rdS 


OS 


^s 


— ' o 




Alexan 
Newp 


Edwar 
Clare 


Frank 
Newp 


Harry 
Clare 


Michae 
Newp 




4 


3 


7 


7 


7 


3harlestown 


4 


17 


18 


20 


18 


31aremont 


70 


87 


130 


131 


115 


/Ornish 




5 


5 





4 


Croydon 




6 


5 


3 


6 


3-oshen 


5 


3 


9 


8 


7 


prrantham 


2 


11 


14 


13 


14 


uangdon 


1 


8 


9 


9 


9 


jempster 


2 


15 


17 


16 


16 


Newport 


126 


36 


86 


87 


98 


Mainfield 


3 


6 


11 


11 


11 


Ipringfield 




5 


5 


3 


5 


lunapee 


11 


8 


16 


15 


16 


Tnity 


2 


11 


13 


12 


12 




1 


6 


6 


6 


6 


Totals 




231 


227 


351 


346 


344 



348 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SULLIVAN 

COUNTY. 

—Concluded. 



Register 








of Probate. 


Commissioners. 








tJQ 






„ 


fl 




9 


-fl 


TS 




M 




Jh 


u 


U 




c3 




e8 
ffl 

ft 


•*> 

h5 o 

2 ^ 


w 

ft 


A 






eS 2 


fH_f 


>{Z! 


ijo 


f-i CQ 


ajrjj 


^ 


<! 


fc 


P4 


7 


6 


6 




20 


14 


13 




112 


137 


76 




4 


6 


4 




5 


5 


4 


1 


7 


6 


8 




13 


12 


13 




9 


6 


8 




17 


12 


11 




109 


70 


87 


25 


11 


11 


7 




5 


4 


4 




18 


11 


19 


2 


13 


10 


10 


1 


5 


6 


7 





Acworth . . . 
Charlestown 
Claremont . 

Cornish 

Croydon . . . 

Goshen 

Grantham . 
Langdon . . 
Lempster . . 
Newport . . 
Plainfield .. 
Springfield 
Sunapee . . . 

Unity 

Washington 

Totals . 



355 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



349 



GRAFTON 
COUNTY. 



Sheriff. 



P4 

si 
is 

w 



Solicitor. Treasurer. 



Register 
of Deeds. 






*£ 

"^ J 
H 



M 2 



-cfri 



1 

2,5 

19 
7 

14 
6 
2 

24 
1 
9 

14 

2S 

II 
3 

23 

36 
4 

13 
8 

32 
9 

2:i 

54 
1 

16 

11 
5 
6 
3 
8 

35 
9 
6 
5 

20 
7 



Totals 



598 



50 



501 



350 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Register 
of Probate. 



Commissioners. 



GRAFTON 

COUNTY. 

—Concluded. 



Alexandria 
Ashland . . 

Bath 

Benton ... 
Bethlehem 
Bristol ... 
Campton . 
Canaan . . . 
Dorchester 

Easton 

Enfield . . . 
Pranconia • 
Grafton . . 
Groton . . . 
Hanover . . 
Haverhill 
Hebron . . . 
Holderness 
Landaff ... 
Lebanon .. 
Lincoln ... 
Lisbon ... 
Littleton . 
Livermore 
Lyman 

Lyme 

Monroe . . . 
Orange ... 
Orford .... 
Piermont . 
Plymouth . 
Rumney . . 
Thornton . 
Warren . . . 
Wentworth 
Woodstock 

Totals 



3^ 



31 



560 



568 



% 83 
cS H 

.CO 



2 
24 
19 

7 
17 
11 

3 
25 

1 

8 
16 
38 
16 

3 
26 
32 

6 
12 
10 
29 

8 
37 
49 

1 
13 
10 

5 
12 

2 

7 
42 
12 

4 

7 
27 

7 

548 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



351 





Sheriff. | 


Solicitor. 


Treas- 
urer. 


COOS 
COUNTY. 


A 
o 
o 
Eh 

_§ s 

E-i w 


Ovide J. Coulombe, 
Berlin. 


Harry G. Noyes, 
Gorham. 


>> 

<s 

It! 


O 

"> o> 


$erlin — 
Ward 1 


49 

51 

8 

14 

19 

11 

67 

17 

7 

3 

7 

21 

23 

96 

7 

22 

10 

2 

5 

8 

27 

118 

"45 


44 
32 

2 
17 

8 

2 
25 

4 

'"4 

6 

2 

36 

"*7 
4 

1 

"i 

75 

i, 1 

17 


13 
26 
5 
4 
7 
9 

43 

11 

4 

6 

6 

33 

23 

53 

9 

18 

4 

1 

5 

7 

12 

41 

"22 


50 


Ward 2 


59 


Ward 3 


11 


Ward 4 


17 
18 


larksville 


11 

67 




17 


>alton 


6 
6 




8 




34 




26 




97 


[ilan 

orthumberland 


10 
28 
10 




3 




5 




10 




24 




112 


r entworth's Location 

r hitefield 

Totals 


"41 


637 


300 


362 


670 







352 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 


Register 








of 


of 








Deeds. ' 


Probate. 


Commissioners. 




£ 










COOS 






0, 


03 

w 


02 


COUNTY. 


ft 


a 


fit 





—Concluded. 


ard J. 
ratford. 


A. Pare 
rlin. 


03 

'073 









P-5 

mm 
H 


o o> 
h4 




^ 


O 
5 Q 


Berlin — 
Ward 1 


44 
49 
7 
14 
20 
10 


... 


47 
49 
7 
17 
16 
10 


37 
40 
5 
14 
18 
10 


34 


"Ward 2 


42 


Ward 3 


5 




12 




14 


Clarksville 


10 




66 
16 




64 
14 


68 
15 


84 


Columbia 


14 




6 




6 


6 


6 


Dummer 


6 




4 


6 


6 




7 
33 

27 


... 


10 

26 
25 


9 

28 
24 


12 




32 


Jefferson 


26 


Lancaster 


89 


... 


81 


91 


85 




9 

23 


| ... 


6 

21 


5 
22 


7 




20 




9 


| 


10 


10 


- 10 




2 




2 


2 


2 


Shelburne 


5 




4 


4 


4 


Stark 


10 

25 

128 


'77 


9 
23 

111 


10 

23 

111 


9 




28 


Stratford 


116 


Wentworth's Location 


1 




1 


1 


1 


Whitefield 


42 




41 


49 


36 


Totals 


648 


77 


1 604 


608 


615 




STATE FLAG. 



ELECTION, NOVEMBER 7, 1916. 

Clie first table gives the vote of the entire state for 
jsident and governor by counties. The second table gives 
vote for congressmen by congressional districts and the 
te of the two referenda submitted to the people, one being 
the expediency of calling a convention to revise the consti- 
tion and the other being on the question of liquor licenses, 
he license question was voted upon only in towns). The 
Ird table gives the vote for councilors by districts, the fourth, 
it for senators, by districts. The fifth table gives the vote 
t* representatives to the legislature by towns and wards en- 
led to representation and in this table votes received by the 
tne candidate under different party emblems are added to- 
ther. The sixth table gives the vote for county officials by 
unties. 

Political parties are designated by first letters, "r." for Republican, "d." 

Democrat, "p." for Progressive, "s." for Socialist nomination papers, 
*oh." for Prohibition nomination papers, "i. d." for Independent Demo- 
t nomination papers, "ind." for Independent nomination papers, and 

p." for candidates whose names did not appear on the ballot at all but 
re written in by voters. 

In the presidential vote, the names of the electors actually voted for are 

given. The names and the vote of each were: 

For Hughes and Fairbanks, Republican — George A. Carpenter of Wolfe- 
o, 43,721; George A. Fairbanks of Newport, 43,722; Charles M. Floyd of 
nchester, 43,720; George B. Leighton of Dublin, 43,723. 

For Wilson and Marshall, Democrat — Charles G. Barnard of Goffstown, 
778; Lawrence A. Connor of Manchester, 43,779; Samuel D. Felker of 
mester, 43,779; Jules Parent of Berlin, 43,778. 

For Benson and Kirkpatrick, Socialist — Otto Bartram of Manchester, 
17; Frank Ludwig of Manchester, 1,316; Gustave Nelson of Concord, 
17; Earle B. Young of Laconia, 1,318. 

For Hanly and Landrith, Prohibition — Jason H. Bliss of Concord, 303; 
■ing C. Brown of Franklin, 303; Samuel T. Noyes of Colebrook, 303; 
srburn L. Swasey of Concord, 303. 

The tables give the last names of candidates. The complete vote for each, 
ing the full name and address, was as follows : 

353 



354 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

For president and vice-president: 

Hughes and Fairbanks 43,725 

Wilson and Marshall . 43,781 

Benson and Kirkpatrick 1,318 

Hanly and Landrith 303 

Total vote 89,127 

Plurality for Wilson and Marshall 56 

For governor: 

Henry W. Keyes of Haverhill, r. & p 45,899 

John C. Hutchins of Stratford, d 38,853 

William H. Wilkins of Claremont, s . 1,199 

Ralph E. Meras of Exeter, proh 288 

Scattering 3 

Total vote 86,242 

Plurality for Keyes 7,046 

Majority for Keyes 5,556 

(Note — The votes for Keyes under the Progressive party emblem was 48, 
which is .05% of the total or less than 3%. This removes the Progressive 
party from the list of regular political parties in New Hampshire.) 

For congressmen, first district: 

Cyrus A. Sulloway of Manchester, r 21,826 

Gordon Woodbury of Bedford, d 19,806 

Lorenz Kierdorf of Manchester, s 592 

Elijah Newell of Sanbornton, proh 144 

Scattering 7 

Total vote 42,375 

Plurality for Sulloway 2,020 

Majority for Sulloway 1,277 

Second district: 

Edward H. Wason of Nashua, r. & p 22,326 

Raymond B. Stevens of Landaff, d 20,145 

Ernest Kunberger of Concord, s 570 

Arthur B. Simonds of Franklin, proh 125 

Scattering 2 

Total vote 43,168 

Plurality for Wason 2,181 

Majority for Wason 1,484 

For councilors, first district: 

Miles W. Gray of Columbia, r. & p 9,901 

Alonzo D. Barrett of Gorham, d 8,272 

Charles A. Hobbs of Berlin, s 240 

John C. Berry of Plymouth, proh 51 

Scattering 1 

Total vote 18,465 

Plurality for Gray 1,629 

Majority for Gray 1,337 



new hampshiee manual. 355 



Second district: 

Charles W. Varney of Rochester, r 9,610 

John Gr. Parsons of Portsmouth, d 7,990 

Total vote 17,600 

Majority for Varney 1,620 

Third district: 

Frank W. Leeman of Manchester, r. & p 6,199 

Moise Verrette of Manchester, d 6,461 

William S. Cooper of Manchester, s. 331 

Total vote 12,991 

Plurality for Verrette 262 

Fourth district: 

William D. Swart of Nashua, r. & p 8,758 

John W. Prentiss of Alstead, d 6,903 

Albert S. Heaton of Keene, s 234 

Total vote 15,895 

Plurality for Swart 1,855 

Majority for Swart 1,621 

Fifth district: 

Edward H. Carroll of Warner, r. & p 10,124 

David E. Murphy of Concord, d 8,387 

Leon Hall of Boscawen, s 226 

Total vote 18,737 

Plurality for Carroll 1,737 

Majority for Carroll 1,511 

^r senators, first district: 

Henry Marble of Gorham, r 1,448 

Daniel J. Daley of Berlin, d 1,675 

John Spinney of Berlin, s 155 

Total vote , 3,278 

Plurality for Daley 227 

Majority for Daley 72 

Second district: 

John G. M. Glessner of Bethlehem, r. & p 1,635 

Wilbur A. Marshall of Colebrook, d 2,298 

Total vote 3,933 

Majority for Marshall 663 

Third district: 

Alfred Stanley of Plymouth, r. & p 2,330 

Myron H. Richardson of Littleton, d 2,088 

Nelson N. Harrington of Campton, proh 17 

Total vote 4,435 

Plurality for Stanley '242 

Majority for Stanley 225 



356 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Fourth district: 

Nathan O. Weeks of Wakefield, r 

John C. L. Wood of Conway, d 

Total vote 

Majority for Weeks 

Fifth district: 

Joseph B. Perley of Enfield, r 

Horace G. Robie of Canaan, d 

Scattering 

Total vote 

Plurality for Perley 

Majority for Perley 

Sixth district: 

Fred S. Roberts of Laconia, r. & p 

George B. Cox of Laconia, d 

George M. Ladd of Laconia, s 

Total vote ; . 

Plurality for Roberts 

Majority for Roberts 

Seventh district: 

Obe G. Morrison of Northfield, r 

Charles P. Coakley of Concord, d 

Scattering 

Total vote 

Plurality for Morrison 

Majority for Morrison 

Eighth district: 

Jesse M. Barton of Newport, r 

Henry E. Charron of Claremont, d 

Total vote 

Majority for Barton 

Ninth district: 

Stillman H. Baker of Hillsborough, r. & p 

Buron W. Sanborn of Salisbury, d 

Scattering 

Total vote 

Plurality for Baker 

Majority for Baker 

Tenth district: 

Forrest W. Hall of Westmoreland, r 

William H. Kiniry of Walpole, d 



2,301 
1,825 


4,126 
476 


2,397 

1,989 

3 


4,389 
408 
405 


2,292 

1,836 

57 


4,185 
456 
399 


2,085 
1,970 

1 


4,056 
115 
114 


2,244 
1,967 


4,211 
277 


2,327 

1,621 

2 


3,950 

706 
704 


1,898 
1,176 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 357 

Alfred E. Lawrence of Westmoreland, s 86 

Scattering 1 

Total vote 3,161 

Plurality for Hall 722 

Majority for Hall 635 

Eleventh district: 

Charles W. Fletcher of Rindge, r. & p 1,875 

Bernard F. Bemis of Harrisville, d 1,416 

Total vote . 3,291 

Majority for Fletcher 459 

Twelfth district: 

Willis C. Hardy of Hollis, r 1,963 

George E. Bales of Wilton, d 1,550 

Scattering 1 

Total vote 3,514 

Plurality for Hardy 413 

Majority for Hardy 412 

Thirteenth district: 

Marcel Theriault of Nashua, r. & p 1,641 

Daniel A. Coffey of Nashua, d 1,541 

Total vote 3,182 

Majority for Theriault 100 

Fourteenth district : 

Herbert B. Fischer of Pittsfield, r. & p 1,835 

Fred M. Pettengill of Pembroke, d 1,865 

Scattering , 1 

Total vote 3,701 

Plurality for PettengiU 30 

Majority for Pettengill 29 

Fifteenth district: 

Joab N. Patterson of Concord, r 1,297 

Nathaniel E. Martin of Concord, d 1,451 

Total vote 2,748 

Majority for Martin 154 

Sixteenth district: 

William H. Maxwell of Manchester, r 1,382 

Morris C. Austin of Manchester, d 703 

Total vote 2,085 

Majority for Maxwell 679 



358 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Seventeenth district: 

Fred O. Parnell of Manchester, r 1,342 

William P. Fahey of Manchester, d 881 

Total vote 2,223 

Majority for Parnell 461 

Eighteenth district: 

Alexis F. Bisson of Manchester, r 1,101 

Michael F. Shea of Manchester, d 2,061 

Total vote 3,162 

Majority for Shea 960 

Nineteenth district: 

Odilon Demers of Manchester, r 531 

Cyprien J. Belanger of Manchester, d 632 

Total vote 1,163 

Majority for Belanger 101 

Twentieth district: 

Malcom A. H. Hart of Milton, r. & p 2,213 

John H. Bates of Rochester, d 2,255 

Total vote 4,468 

Majority for Bates 42 

Twenty-first district: 

George Ira Leighton of Dover, r 1,808 

Scott W. Caswell of Dover, d 1,593 

Total vote 3,401 

Majority for Leighton , 215 

Twenty-second district : 

Daniel M. Boyd of Londonderry, r. & p 2,651 

Frank N. Young of Derry, d 2,415 

Total vote 5,066 

Majority for Boyd 236 

Twenty-third district: 

Clarence M. Collins of Danville, r. & p 2,383 

William D. Ingalls of East Kingston, d 1,415 

Total vote 3,798 

Majority for Collins 968 

Twenty-fourth district : 

William J. Cater of Portsmouth, r 1,742 

Calvin Page of Portsmouth, d 1,863 

Oliver L. Frisbee of Portsmouth, p 172 

Total vote 3,777 

Plurality for Page 121 

The vote on the expediency of calling a convention to revise the consti- 
tution was favorable by 21,589 to 14,520, the total vote being 36,109 and the 
majority, 7,069. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



359 



Rockingham County. 
r sheriff: 

Ceylon Spinney of Portsmouth, r. & p 6,583 

Joseph L. Schurman of Portsmouth, d 4,362 

Total vote 10,945 

Majority for Spinney 2,221 

r county solicitor: 

William H. Sleeper of Exeter, r. & p 6,073 

Samuel W. Emery of Portsmouth, d 4,947 

Total vote 11,025 

Majority for Sleeper 1,131 

r county treasurer: 

Stewart Everett Rowe of Exeter, r 6,158 

Forrest N. Tilton of East Kingston, d 4,577 

Total vote 10,735 

Majority for Rowe 1,581 

register of deeds : 

John W. A. Green of Exeter, r. & p 6,432 

Wallace Keezer of Danville, d 4,364 

Total vote 10,796 

Majority for Green 2,068 

register of probate: 

Robert Scott of Exeter, r. & p 6,199 

John F. Emery of Stratham, d 4,501 

Total vote 10,700 

Majority for Scott , 1,698 

county commissioners: < 

Norman H. Beane of Portsmouth, r. & p 6,394 

William B. Underhill of Chester, r. & p 6,213 

George A. Carlisle of Exeter, r. & p 6,150 

John W. Sleeper of Plaistow, d 4,535 

George A. Prescott of Kensington, d 4,482 

George W. McCarthy of Portsmouth, d 4,450 

Total vote 32,224 

Strafford County. 

sheriff : 

Edward S. Young, of Dover, r. & p. 4,509 

Joseph D. Willey of Milton, d 3,340 

Total vote 7,849 

Majority for Young 1 169 



7,727 


969 


4,302 


3,449 


7,751 


853 


4,275 


3,482 



360 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



For county solicitor: 

Albert P. Sherry of Dover, 'r. & p 4,348 

James McCabe of Dover, d 3,379 

Total vote 

Majority for Sherry . . 

For county treasurer: 

Frank N. French of Dover, r. & p 

Haven Doe of Somersworth, d 

Total vote 

Majority for French 

For register of deeds: 

G-eorge G. Welch of Dover, r. & p 

Sumner W. Watson of Rochester, d 

Total vote 7,757 

Majority for Welch 793 

For register of probate: 

William W. Martin of Dover, r., d. & p 7,481 

For county commissioners: 

James B. Young of Rochester, r. & p 

Lorenzo E. Baer of Rollinsford, r 

Lewis A. Scruton of Dover, r. & p 

Edgar J. Ham of Rochester, d 

Frank M. Libby of Dover, d 

Charles E. Hoitt of Durham, d 

Total vote 23,212 

Belknap County. 
For sheriff: 

Frederick D. Elliott of Laconia, r. & p. . . 

Joseph R. Chase of Laconia, d 

Total vote 

Majority for Elliott 

For county solicitor: 

Fletcher Hale of Laconia, r. & p 

Fortunat E. Normandin of Laconia, d. 

Total vote 

Majority for Hale 

For county treasurer: 

Charles J. Hayford of Laconia, r. & p 

Charles E. Smith of Tilton, d 

Total vote 

Majority for Hayford 



4,207 


4,088 


4,088 


3,739 


3,551 


3,539 



2,786 
2,066 


4,852 
720 


2,778 
2,014 


4,792 
764 


2,751 
1,994 


4,745 
757 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 361 



For register of deeds: 

Herbert N. Thyng of New Hampton, r 2,711 

Herbert N. Sanborn of Laconia, d. & p 2,074 

Total vote 4,785 

Majority for Thyng 637 

For register of probate : 

Thomas C. Hill of Laconia, r., d. & p 4,749 

For county commissioners : 

Arthur C. S. Randlett of Laconia, r. & p 2,705 

Stephen L. Weeks of Grilmanton, r. & p 2,681 

Walter C. Wyatt of Tilton, r. & p 2,449 

Jonathan C. Shannon of Laconia, d 2,312 

Matthias Kimball of Gilford, d 2,030 

Ernest N. Sanborn of Belmont, d 2,000 

Total vote 14,177 

Carroll County. 
For sheriff: 

Wilbur H. Gilman of Wolfeboro, r 1,915 

Arthur W. Chandler of Conway, d 2,222 

Total vote 4,137 

Majority for Chandler 307 

'or county solicitor: 

Walter D. H. Hill of Conway, r 2,199 

William N. Rogers of Wakefield, d 1,909 

Total vote 4,108 

Majority for Hill 290 

'or county treasurer: 

Samuel A. Hidden of Tamworth, r 2,235 

William M. Lord of Wakefield, d. ..,.'. 1,785 

Total vote 4,020 

Majority for Hidden 450 

'or register of deeds: 

Fred R. Eastman of Ossipee, r 2,331 

Fred W. Bickford of Ossipee, d 1,715 

Total vote 4,046 

Majority for Eastman 616 

or register of probate : 

Charles S. Miles of Ossipee, r 2,303 

Everett Hodgkins of Tamworth, d 1,748 

Total vote 4,051 

Majority for Miles 555 



362 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



For county commissioners: 

George A. Blanchard of Moultonborough, r 2,264 

Arthur R. Shirley of Conway, r 2,232 

John E. Perkins of Freedom, r 2,222 

Dana J. Brown of Ossipee, d 1,800 

William A. Bixby of Wolfeboro, d 1,797 

William Pitman of Bartlett, d 1,779 

Total vote 12,094 

Merrimack County. 
For sheriff: 

Charles P. Smith of Concord, r. & p 6,603 

Benjamin J. Prescott of Concord, d 4,935 

Total vote 11,538 

Majority for Smith 1,668 

For county solicitor: 

William W. Thayer of Concord, r. & p 6,116 

John W. Stanley of Concord, d 5,337 

Total vote 11,453 

Majority for Thayer 779 

For county treasurer: 

Harry F. Davis of Franklin, r. & p 6,144 

Patrick J. Bolger of Concord, d 5,286 

Total vote 11,430 

Majority for Davis 858 

For register of deeds: 

Edmund H. Brown of Concord, r. & p 6,446 

Fred C. Woodbury of Pittsfield, d 4,979 

Total vote 11,425 

Majority for Brown . 1,467 

For register of probate: 

Irad Eugene Keeler of Concord, r. & p 6,502 

Frederick M. Colby of Warner, d 4,893 

Total vote 11,395 

Majority for Keeler 1,609 

For county commissioners: 

Arthur H. Britton of Concord, r. & p 6,576 

John G. McQuilkin of Concord, r. & p 6,390 

John F. Jewell of Warner, r. & p 6,321 

Enos K. Sawyer of Franklin, d 5,075 

Henry H. Chase of Concord, d 5,029 

Edward Connelly of Henniker, d 4,897 

Total vote 34,288 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



363 



Hillsborough County. 
jr sheriff: 

John T. O'Dowd of Manchester, d 

George L. Stearns of Manchester, r. & p 

John Priem of Manchester, s 

Scattering 

Total vote 

Plurality for O'Dowd 

)r county solicitor: 

John R. Spring of Nashua, r. & p 

Alvin J. Lucier of Nashua, d 

Scattering , 

Total vote 

Plurality for Spring 

Majority for Spring •. 

>r county treasurer: 

Albert H. White of Manchester, r. & p 

Anson G. Osgood of Manchester, d 

William H. Sprigg of Manchester, s 

Scattering 

Total vote 

Plurality for White 

Majority for White 

r register of deeds: 

Calvin R. Wood of Nashua, r. & p 

Samuel J. Dearborn of Manchester, d 

Michael B. Roth of Manchester, s 

Scattering 

Total vote ' 

Plurality for Wood 

Majority for Wood 

r register of probate: 

Elbridge J. Copp of Nashua, r. & p 

Samuel J. Connor of Manchester, d 

Scattering 

Total vote 

Plurality for Copp 

Majority for Copp 

r county commissioners: 

James H. Hunt of Nashua, r. & p 

Albert T. Barr of Manchester, r. & p 

Edson H. Patch of Francestown, r. & p 

Theophile J. Labrecque of Manchester, d. .... 



10,018 

9,989 

329 

1 

20,337 
29 



10,087 
9,869 

1 

19,957 
218 
217 



10,370 

9,083 

332 

1 

19,786 

1,287 

954 



10,475 

9,177 

300 

1 

19,953 

1,298 

997 



10,454 
9,103 

1 

19,558 
1,351 
1,350 



10,627 

10,427 

9,832 

9,158 



364 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

John J. Baker of Hudson, d 9,037 

Fred W. Gould of Greenfield, d 8,537 

Scattering 1 



Total vote 57,619 

Cheshire County. 
For sheriff: 

Edward H. Lord of Keene, r. & p 3,589 

Andrew J. Sweeney of Keene, d 2,147 

George W. Atwood of Swanzey, s 108 

Scattering 1 

Total vote 

Plurality for Lord 

Majority for Lord 

For county solicitor: 

Philip H. Faulkner of Keene, r. & p 

Richard J. Wolfe of Keene, d 

Leon H. Fellows of Keene, s 

Total vote 

Plurality for Faulkner 

Majority for Faulkner 

For county treasurer: 

Wallace L. Mason of Keene, r. & p 

John B. Adams of Keene, d 

Herber L. Fisher of Keene, s 

Total vote 

Plurality for Mason 

Majority for Mason 

For register of deeds: 

Charles C. Buffum of Keene, r. & p 

Fred J. Marvin of Alstead, d 

Samuel E. Howard of Keene, s 

Total vote 

Plurality for Buffum 

Majority for Buffum 

For register of probate: 

Adolf W. Pressler of Keene, r. & p 

John J. Landers of Keene, d 

Robert B. Chase of Keene, s , 

Total vote 5,628 

Plurality for Pressler 1 247 

Majority for Pressor 1,138 



5,845 


1,442 


1,333 


3,497 


2,137 


103 


5,737 


1,360 


1,257 


3,467 


2,151 


102 


5,720 


1,316 


1,214 


3,495 


2,183 


106 


5.734 


1,362 


1,256 


3,383 


2,136 


109 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 365 

For county commissioners: 

Frank A. Davis of Hinsdale, r. & p 3,379 

Marquis O. Spaulding of Keene, r. & p 3,331 

Charles M. Norwood of Keene, r. & p 3,302 

Merrill Mason of Marlborough, d 2,233 

Benjamin F. Allen of Keene, d 2,183 

Andrew E. Towne of Keene, d 2,168 

Isaac T. Barron of Keene, s Ill 

Jeremiah Donovan of Keene, s Ill 

George H. Perry of Winchester, s 110 

Scattering 4 



Total vote 16,932 

Sullivak County. 
For sheriff: 

Albert I. Barton of Croydon, r. & p 2,269 

Alexander C. Gion of Newport, d 1,921 

Total vote 

Majority for Barton 

^r county solicitor: 

Henry S. Richardson of Claremont, r. & p 

Frank O. Chellis of Newport, d 

Total vote 

Majority for Richardson 

'or county treasurer: 

Walter H. Perry of Charlestown, r 

Harry T. Eaton of Claremont, d 

Total vote 

Majority for Perry 

'or register of deeds: 

Charles W. Rounsevel of Newport, r. & p 

Michael J. Hourihan of Newport, d 

Total vote 

Majority for Rounsevel 

'or register of probate: 

Elisha M. Kempton of Newport, r 

Tyler L. Barker of Newport, d 

Total vote 4,029 

Majority for Kempton 607 

'or county commissioners : 

Henry C. Sanders, Sr., of Claremont, r 2,357 

Frederick W. Aiken of Newport, r 2,286 

William W. Ballock of Cornish, r 2,217 



4,190 


348 


2,291 


1,823 


4,114 


468 


2,216 


1,850 


4,066 


366 


2,466 


1,620 


4,086 


846 


2,318 


1,711 



366 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Arthur L. Fitch of Claremont, d 1,912 

Frank M. Harding of Sunapee, d 1,740 

Perley Walker of Grantham, d 1,668 

Total vote 12,180 

Grafton County. 
For sheriff: 

Joseph P. Huckins of Plymouth, r. & p 4,930 

Benjamin M. Reynolds of Lebanon, d 4,081 

George E. Walker of Lisbon, proh 25 

Total vote 9,036 

Plurality for Huckins 849 

Majority for Huckins 824 

For county solicitor: 

Raymond U. Smith of Haverhill, r. & p 4,885 

Edward J. Cummings of Littleton, d 4,093 

Total vote 8,978 

Majority for Smith 792 

For county treasurer: 

Earnest H. Hallett of Lisbon, r. & p 4,960 

Willis F. Hardy of Ashland, d 3,963 

Arthur N. Drury of Haverhill, proh 26 

Total vote 8,949 

Plurality for Hallett 997 

Majority for Hallett 971 

For register of deeds: 

William J. Randolph of Plymouth, r. & p 5,069 

John Keniston of Plymouth, d 3,949 

Charles H. Dimick of Lyme, proh 23 

Total vote 9,041 

Plurality for Randolph 1,120 

Majority for Randolph 1,097 

For register of probate: 

Russell T. Bartlett of Haverhill, r. & p . . . 5,010 

George W. Pike of Lisbon, d 3,940 

Harris B. Page of Plymouth, proh 22 

Total vote 8,972 

Plurality for Bartlett 1,070 

Majority for Bartlett 1,048 

For county commissioners: 

Ora A. Brown of Ashland, r. & p 4,956 

George H. Turner of Bethlehem, r. & p 4,909 

Harry E. Morrison of Orford, r. & p 4,904 

Roland A. Lewin of Hanover, d 4 024 

Edward B. Parker of Franconia, d 4,012 

Charles D. Whittier of Orange, d 3,968 

Total vote 26 773 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 367 

Coos County. 
For sheriff: 

George W. Brown of Berlin, r. & p 3,282 

Thomas M. Toohey of Berlin, d 2,618 

David Holms of Gorham, s 119 

Total vote 6,019 

Plurality for Brown 664 

Majority for Brown 545 

For county solicitor: 

Fred W. Baker of Lancaster, r. & p 2,663 

Harry G. Noyes of Gorham, d 2,993 

James Glover of Gorham, s 148 

Total vote 5,804 

Plurality for Noyes 330 

Majority for Noyes 182 

For county treasurer: 

John D. Annis of Colebrook, r 2,834 

Daniel W. Coffey of Berlin, d 2,861 

Irving Bailey of Berlin, s 155 

Total vote 5,850 

Plurality for Coffey 27 

For register of deeds: 

David Eugene Rowell of Lancaster, r 2,806 

Edward J. Daley of Stratford, d 2,969 

George L. Marrer of Berlin, s 147 

Total vote 5,922 

Plurality for Daley 163 

Majority for Daley 16 

for register of probate: 

Fielding Smith of Lancaster, r. & p 2,916 

Leo A. Parent of Berlin, d 2,702 

Ephreme Boutin of Berlin, s 153 

Total vote 5771 

Plurality for Smith 214 

Majority for Smith 61 

^r county commissioners : 

Joseph A. Vaillancourt of Berlin, r. & p 2,916 

Alba C. Hicks of Colebrook, d 2,856 

Frank D. Page of Whitefield, r. & p 2,768 

Wheatley B. Cook of Stewartstown, r 2,767 

Antoine Babin of Berlin, d 2,685 

William A. Harris of Whitefield, d 2,621 

Peter Henry of Berlin, s 132 

Henry E. Stahl of Berlin, s 130 

Ed O. Colby of Whitefield, p 12 

Total vote 16,887 



368 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



ROCKINGHAM 
COUNTY. 



Atkinson 

Auburn 

Brentwood 

Candia 

Chester 

Danville 

Deerfield 

Derry 

East Kingston.. 

Epping 

Exeter 

Fremont 

Greenland 

Hampstead 

Hampton 

Hampton Falls. 

Kensington 

Kingston 

Londonderry ... 

Newcastle 

Newfields 

Newington 

Newmarket 

Newton 

North Hampton. 

Northwood 

Nottingham 

Plaistow 

Portsmouth — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Raymond 

Rye 

Salem 

Sandown 

Seabrook 

South Hampton. 

Stratham 

Windham 



President. 



50 

78 

84 

107 

111 

101 

135 

547 

48 

122 

552 

74 

89 

97 

217 

89 

54 

123 

176 

34 

61 

19 

184 

128 

92 

130 

109 

141 

264 

485 

147 

158 

132 

138 

135 

286 

42 

149 

38 

71 



Totals 



84 
52 

110 
59 
36 
96 

725 
68 

202 

362 
35 
58 
81 

162 
23 
52 

132 

144 
83 
57 
37 

300 
71 

113 
96 
67 
71 

339 

448 

274 

202 

122 

179 

149 

124 

48 

195 

28 

76 

38 



Governor. 



5,866 5,637 



48 



50 

85 

91 

112 

119 

10:5 

134 

575 

53 

119 

590 

77 

103 

105 

237 

90 

58 

124 

200 

37 

65 

23 

178 

127 

96 

138 

113 

135 

285 

519 

146 

177 

138 

145 

143 

289 

41 

146 

40 

73 

72 



6,151 4, 



35 



99 
45 
27 
83 

645 
64 

201 

283 
26 
42 
59 

124 
16 
43 

119 

103 
78 
47 
32 

292 
57 

100 
80 
58 
63 



382 

254 

168 

109 

168 

131 

92 

41 

142 

25 

69 

28 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



309 



President. 



STRAFFORD 
COUNTY. 



Barrington . . . 
Dover- 
Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Durham 

Farmington . . 

Lee 

Madbury 

Middleton . . . 

Milton 

New Durham. . 
Rochester 1 — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 

Rollinsford ... 
Somersworth — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 



Strafford 
Totals 



126 

351 

321 

323 

401 

17 

115 

106 

66 

44 

42 

241 

43 

157 
133 

153 
131 
166 
231 
110 

90 
89 
74 
53 
24 
131 



4,037 



93 

220 

289 

167 

294 

189 

85 

301 

62 

40 

43 

144 

91 

173 
193 
125 
259 
135 
186 
151 

103 
144 

120 
221 
118 
94 



1,040 



Governor. 



a ! 
. I 





-d 




w 




a 






05 


a 




« 


>, 




a> 


p 


M 


W 


130 


78 


383 


176 


356 


235 


:::,;; 


130 


418 


259 


19 


185 


111 


74 


416 


274 


66 


59 


45 


40 


43 


43 


252 


122 


39 


88 


177 


136 


138 


176 


159 


111 


144 


227 


173 


116 


233 


161 


111 


147 



4,234 



96 


98 


94 


138 


74 


119 


48 


221 


24 


115 


L32 


83 



3,611 



370 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



BELKNAP 
COUNTY. 



President. 



Alton i 205 

Barnstead [ 134 

Belmont i 127 

Center Harbor ! 48 

Gilford 106 

Gilmanton 117 

Laconia— 

Ward 1 118 

Ward 2 188 

Ward 3 ! 93 

Ward 4 210 

Ward 5 206 

Ward 6 327 

Meredith 246 

New Hampton 89 

Sanbornton I 127 

Tilton ; 238 

Totals 2,579 



178 
153 
146 
58 
92 
126 

118 

187 
57 
132 
182 
200 



85 
270 



2,310 



Governor. 



^ 




j 


DO 


& 


„ 


ti 




to 









A 






O 


CD 


M 


-*i 


>> 


a 


& 


CD 

M 


£ 



1 


211 


167 




1 


144 


142 




1 


136 


140 






53 


52 




4 


118 


69 




3 


126 


112 






127 


109 




5 


194 


175 




1 


99 


50 




1 


215 


126 


.... 




213 


167 


1 


18 


334 


184 




14 


250 


214 






98 


77 






143 


67 





i 


236 


261 




50 


2,697 


2,112 


1 



2 I 



41 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



371 



President. 



Governor. 



CARROLL 




















COUNTY. 








J 




"d 






^ 




u 


t3 


w 


2 


t* 


a 


ft 


to 


ft 




co 


n 

o 


d 
o 


£ 


CO 


3 


to 

CD 


.2 


co 




to 




d 


d 


>» 




>> 








2 






e3 














M 


£ 


ffl 


w 


M 


W 


M 


£ 


3 


Albany 


12 


25 






13 


22 








Bartlett 


84 


146 


3 


i 


87 


135 


2 


2 


i 


Brookfield 


36 


32 






32 


32 








Chatham 


27 


38 






26 


37 












Conway 


426 


387 


7 


4 


435 


352 








7 


4 


Eaton 


54 


39 






56 


36 












Effingham 


87 


62 






88 


58 








1 




Freedom 


54 


107 






59 


98 










Hart's Location... 


2 


2 






2 


2 










Jackson 


59 


61 




i 


56 


59 








1 


Madison 


88 


59 






86 


58 










Moultonborough .. 


218 


29 


1 




221 


23 






1 






237 
133 


174 
131 


"i 


2 


241 
134 


162 
118 






"i 


1 


Sandwich 


1 


Tamworth 


130 


117 






140 


93 










Tuftonboro 


92 


97 


l 




99 


86 






l 




Wakefield 


167 


212 




1 


175 


198 










1 


Wolfe boro 


353 


285 


9 


1 


362 


269 








9 


1 


Totals 


2,259 


2,003 


22 


10 


I 2,312 


1,838 


2 


22 


10 



372 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



MERRIMACK 
COUNTY. 



President. 



Allenstown 
Andover . . 
Boscawen 

Bow , 

Bradford . 
Canterbury- 
Chichester 
Concord- 



Ward 1 ... 

Ward 2 ... 

Ward 3 ... 

Ward 4 ... 

Ward 5 ... 

Ward 6 ... 

Ward 7 ... 

Ward 8 ... 

Ward 9 ... 

Danbury 

Dunbarton . 

Epsom 

Franklin — 

Ward 1 .... 

Ward 2 ..., 

Ward 3 .... 

Henniker 

Hill 

Hooksett 

Hopkinton ... 

Loudon , 

Newbury 
New London. 
Northfield ... 
Pembroke ... 
Pittsfield .... 
Salisbury .... 

Sutton 

Warner 

Webster 

Wilmot 



Totals 



212 
73 
136 
464 
343 
367 



147 
85 
78 
99 

179 
168 
268 
185 

92 
154 
218 
100 

62 
119 



250 
62 
88 

212 
70 
74 



91 


121 


144 


184 


139 


115 


72 


80 


90 


120 


62 


82 


83 


82 



5,970 



294 
111 
117 
412 
219 
344 
373 
218 
209 
87 
43 
92 

112 

265 

244 

180 

43 

190 

217 

100 

71 

93 

133 

284 

304 

63 

106 

125 

53 

81 



5,967 



Governor. 



95 


111 


144 


179 


146 


101 


78 


69 


88 


117 


67 


77 


87 


77 


202 


289 



76 
147 
501 
362 
384 
539 

97 
139 



100 ; 

99 
354 
195 
309 
303 
204 
193 

81 



160 



7 


182 


106 


2 


160 


248 


6 


253 


237 




205 


150 




96 


36 


2 


156 


166 


3 


222 


206 


1 


103 


89 




62 


66 


1 


121 


85 




209 


123 : 


1 


218 


258 


4 


247 


305 


1 


60 


62 




97 


92 




220 


110 




67 


50 




75 


72 


47 


6,170 


5,443 



2 




29 


4 


15 


5 


9 


1 


5 


1 


14 




2 




11 


1 



152 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



373 





President. 




Governor 






HILLS- 
BOROUGH 
COUNTY. 


-a 

u 


o 
xix 


o 


J3 



u 
ft 

S3 

H 

I 

"1 

"i 
i 
3 

-i 

4 
4 

8 
3 

"4 

"5 

2 

"i 

1 

3 
1 

"i 


to 

<v 

>> 

o> 

M 


1 


a* 


02 

c. 




ft 




104 

176 

138 

74 

49 

21 

87 

294 

44 

75 

58 

291 

122 

189 

40 

92 

453 
539 
538 
452 
160 
496 
161 
360 
336 
294 
307 
274 
280 

29 
118 
474 

42 

417 
243 

99 
117 

54 
124 
299 
367 
116 


80 

127 

105 

72 

56 

68 

56 

267 

72 

168 

103 

264 

69 

137 

32 

56 

179 
341 
424 
352 
718 
538 
637 
536 
343 
269 
431 
301 
317 
34 
93 
265 
37 

217 
223 
290 
135 

82 
187 
444 
560 
363 


2 
2 
4 

..! 

5 
3 

2 

1 

"6 
2 
6 
3 
1 

2 
13 
32 
20 
24 
30 
10 
16 

5 

71 

105 

31 

3 

'l5 

10 

5 
8 
5 

'21 

3 
18 


110 

186 

139 

75 

50 

21 

86 

305 

43 

77 

64 

340 

129 

207 

42 

103 

462 
587 
571 
462 
172 
520 
167 
391 
366 
305 
329 
279 
294 

32 
130 
479 

50 

438 
259 
105 
127 
54 
132 
377 
374 
148 


67 

112 
97 
68 
48 
65 
47 

253 
70 

159 
89 

217 
55 

109 
30 
45 

151 

288 
367 
320 
663 

487 

608 

479 

277 

248 

411 

274 

285 

28 

82 

224 

29 

180 
192 
260 
115 
76 
156 
405 
510 
314 


" i 

2 

"i 

"2 

2 

""2 

6 

*"i 

3 

"2 

2 


2 
2 
3 

1' 

"5 
3 
2 

..! 
-i 

\ 

2 

8 
29 
19 
24 
27 

9 
14 

5 
64 
87 
31 

2 

•ii 

9 

5 
8 
1 

'l7 

4 

16 


1 

2 


Antrim 


Bedford 

Bennington 

Brookline 






Francestown 


"*i 


Greenfield 

Greenville 

Hancock 

Hillsborough 

Hollis 


4 




3 


Litchfield 

Lyndeborough 

Manchester — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 


"3 
3 


Ward 3 

Ward 4 


3 
5 


Ward 5 

Ward 6 

Ward 7 


3 


Ward 8 


i 


Ward 9 


5 


Ward 10 




Ward 11 

Ward 12 


3 


Ward 13 




Mason 




Merrimack 

Milford , 




Mont Vernon 

Nashua — 
Ward 1 


i 

1 


Ward 2 


1 


Ward 3 




Ward 4 




Ward 5 




Ward 6 




Ward 7 

Ward 8 .... 




Ward 9 


2 







374 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 







President. 






G-overnoi 






HILLS- 




















BOROUGH 




















COUNTY. 








o 




*5 









—Concluded. 










* 








u 


-tf 




t-, 




















P< 


ht 


to 


a 




a 






a 


o 


£ 


oa 


A 


«0 




«o 




bC 


w 


to 


a 


& 




>> 


£ 


g 




a 


* 


n 


fl 


<x> 


& 


o 
M 


1 





New Boston 


134 


99 






136 


89 








New Ipswich 


73 


37 


6 




77 


27 




6 






99 
258 


79 
239 


2 
3 


"i 


100 
262 


69 
220 


""2 


3 

2 




Peterborough 


1 


Sharon 


1 


12 






9 


3 


.... 








34 


21 






36 


17 


1 


1 


1 


Weare 


167 


191 


3 


6 


172 


178 




3 


4 


Wilton 


154 


209 


1 


3 


164 


187 




1 


1 


Windsor 


4 


4 






3 


4 








Totals 


9,927 


10,939 


502 


60 


10,546 


9,754 


27 


445 


50 







NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



375 



CHESHIRE 
COUNTY. 



President. 



Governor. 



Alstead ! 91 

Chesterfield ! 93 

Dublin i 60 

Fitzwilliam j 95 

Gilsum ! 56 

Harrisville 59 

Hinsdale 204 

Jaffrey 186 

Keene — 

Ward 1 307 

Ward 2 256 

Ward 3 248 

Ward 4 201 

Ward 5 169 

Marlborough 164 

Marlow j 41 

Nelson 31 

Richmond . 50 

Rindge | 110 

Roxbury | 7 

Stoddard j 21 

Sullivan 36 

Surry | 31 

Swanzey l 162 

Troy I 101 

Walpole ! 210 

Westmoreland 61 

Winchester 287 

Totals 3,337 



54 
39 
53 
40 
83 
198 
196 

210 

135 

146 

89 

171 

108 

31 

12 

36 

41 

3 

21 

12 

20 

194 

111 

353 

73 

251 

2,779 



4 
121 



3 I 
o I 

02 





is 




i£ 


to 



d 








03 


A 


(0 








>> 


■s 


>» 


<D 





o; 


M 


W 


M 



94 
64 

131 
55 
63 

212 



85 
42 
28 
37 
37 
73 
136 
178 





321 


177 




248 


114 




267 


120 




209 


72 




168 


161 




179 


87 




42 


27 




32 


12 




49 


27 




111 


36 




10 


3 




•24 


20 




37 


10 




33 


15 




159 


176 


1 


100 


100 




240 


246 




78 


45 




283 


210 


7 


3,459 


2,274 




4 
3 

114 



10 



376 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SULLIVAN 
COUNTY. 



Acworth 
Charlestown 
Claremont . . 

Cornish 

Croydon 

Goshen 

Grantham . . 
Langdon 
Lempster ... 

Newport 

Plainfield ... 
Springfield . 

Sunapee 

Unity 

Washington 



President. 



Governor. 



Totals 2,193 2,215 



65 

189 

669 

116 

56 

37 

39 

40 

42 

540 

108 

69 

128 

58 

37 



Wilson, d. 


a 

o 

a 

CD 

n 


46 

200 

906 

80 

30 

43 

42 

37 

48 

366 

123 

49 

135 

64 

46 


"2 

22 

... | 
... 

'.*.'. 1 

"2 

■ ■* 1 

••• 

-3 





nd 








„< 




42 


fH 


to 


ft 


02 




a 




a 











69 


40 






200 


162 






723 


752 


2 


22 


127 


60 






55 


23 






42 


30 






39 


40 






40 


32 






40 


47 






570 


307 




2 


118 


102 






69 


45 






132 


119 






69 


47 






47 


34 




2 


2,340 


1,840 


2 


26 



10 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



377 



GRAFTON 
COUNTY. 



President. 



60 
174 

87 
11 

99 
21 
198 
117 
222 
31 
12 

7 

176 

48 

92 

24 

246 

478 

17 

104 

35 

621 

50 

303 

489 

4 
35 
139 
43 
24 
87 
68 
307 
97 
75 
81 

7 
39 
72 



84 
192 
115 
23 
162 
30 
151 
78 
1. il- 
ls 
32 
5 
137 



Governor. 



88 




82 


1 


25 




218 


1 


378 


3 


32 


3 


80 




62 




570 


6 


38 




303 




576 


7 


2 




61 




71 




35 




20 




75 




67 




286 


8 


115 


2 


62 


2 


87 




"81 




71 


i 



Totals 



4,795 4,644 



29 





•V 




ri 


a 


ft 










A 


to 








t>> 




>> 







CD 


M 


w 


M 


61 


81 




182 


177 




109 


91 




18 


17 




103 


151 




25 


26 




207 


130 




121 


63 




228 


125 




32 


16 




13 


31 




7 


5 




192 


115 




50 


79 




94 


81 




29 


22 




255 


170 




658 


202 




19 


29 


1 


112 


66 




37 


59 


1 


646 


504 




50 


36 




311 


288 




491 


564 




6 


2 




40 


45 




146 


59 




47 


26 




23 


19 




96 


62 




86 


48 




333 


250 




104 


105 




77 


55 




91 


69 




7 






48 


69 




76 


66 




5.230 


4,003 


2 





,«' 











., 


ft 


a 


. 






M 


<s 






b 


CD 

3 


2 




1 




"*2 


"i 


"i 


'"5 


n 




"i 




2 


1 


3 


3 


3 


1 




1 


"3 




2 


'"2 


7 


1 




"i 


'5 


'"6 


2 


1 


2 






'"i 




3 


47 


27 



378 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



President. 



Governor. 



COOS 
COUNTY. 



a 



Berlin- 
Ward 1 .„., ! 178 

Ward 2 242 

Ward 3 t 203 

Ward 4 68 

Carroll j 82 

Clarksville 14 

Colebrook ' 254 

Columbia < 91 

Dalton j 54 

Dummer \ 11 

Errol ! 24 

Gorham 149 

Jefferson 129 

Lancaster 420 

Milan | 75 

Northumberland .. 183 

Pittsburg j 84 

Randolph ! 14 

Shelburne I 24 

Stark j 38 

Stewartstown 127 

Stratford 60 

Wentworth's Loc'n 3 

Whitefield 235 

Totals 2,762 



316 

184 



140 

346 

77 

258 

59 

10 

19 

76 

106 

150 

9 

210 



3,247 



123 


19 


90 


1 


48 




287 




45 




51 




33 




38 




246 


20 



1 

2 
1 

"*2 
210 




NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



379 





Congressman. 


Convention. 


License. 


FIRST 




. 




g 








CONGRESSIONAL 


M 














DISTRICT. 


* 

eS 


H 


o 
n3 














^q 






* 


m 










id 


£ 








O 








02 


M 


fc 


tH 


fc 


(H 


fe; 



Albany 

Allenstown 

Alton 

Atkinson 

Auburn 

Barnstead 

Barrington .... 

Bartlett 

Bedford 

Belmont 

Brentwood 

Brookfield 

Candia 

Canterbury 

Center Harbor . 

Chatham 

Chester 

Chichester 

Conway 

Danville 

Deerfield 

Derry 

Dover- 
Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Durham 

East Kingston . 

Eaton 

Effingham 

Epping 

Epsom 

Exeter 

Farmington 

Freedom 

Fremont 

Gilford 

Gilmanton 

Goffstown 

Greenland 

Hampstead 

Hampton 

Hampton Falls. . 
Hart's Location. 
Hooksett 



206 

51 

80 

140 

133 

91 

77 

131 

88 

35 

111 

73 

49 

26 

116 

89 

428 

113 

144 

565 

381 

349 

330 

408 

15 

110 

53 

56 

93 

117 

95 

529 

420 

56 

79 

122 

126 

272 

101 

106 

247 

91 

2 

155 



22 

118 

171 

35 

75 

142 

75 

133 

173 

139 

37 

31 

102 

69 

53 

37 

53 

80 

356 

24 

81 

631 



339 

267 

102 

24 

69 

113 

286 

40 

55 

125 

14 

2 

170 



8 



178 • ... 

235 12 

149 2 

268 : ' 7 
186 

76 3 

64 

36 

52 j ... 

201 1 



3 
76 

108 
5 
33 
74 
69 
38 
52 

126 
16 
li* 
36 
33 
14 
6 
38 
43 

114 
36 
72 

358 

91 

119 

80 

135 

20 

39 

24 

6 

19 
78 
46 
265 
141 
24 
10 
34 
46 



8 
28 
40 
32 
45 
71 
25 
50 
36 
42 
30 
11 
46 
30 
23 
3 
54 
25 

180 
20 
.37 

239 

78 

51 
38 
73 
4 
35 
21 
16 
18 
74 
27 
236 
156 
44 
40 
53 
55 



121 

117 
8 

30 
97 
26 
24 
27 
45 
14 
5 
31 
24 
5 
2, 
16 
14 

120 
18 
83 

610 



16 

15 

8 

18 

165 

23 

213 

236 

18 

11 

22 





173 


97 


85 


i 


16 


21 


9 


2 


39 


20 


8 


7 


65 


92 


88 




10 


21 
1 


2 


2 


82 


87 


124 



10 

76 

218 

41 

55 

143 

110 

107 

91 

161 

60 

33 

99 

67 

58 

18 

99 

73 

383 

68 

103 

556 



106 

48 

27 

44 

124 

85 

559 

375 

66 

53 

111 

106 

293 

63 

91 

201 

53 

1 

176 



380 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL, 

DISTRICT. 

—Continued. 



Hudson . . . 
Jackson ... 
Kensington 
Kingston . . 
Laconia— 



Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Lee 

Litchfield 

Londonderry . . 

Loudon 

Madbury 

Madison 

Manchester- 
Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 , 

Ward 7 

Ward 8 

Ward 9 

Ward 10 

Ward 11 

Ward 12 

Ward 13 

Meredith 

Merrimack 

Middleton 

Milton 

Moultonborough 

Newcastle 

New Durham... 
New Hampton . 

Newfields 

Newington 

Newmarket 

Newton 

North Hampton 

Northfield 

Northwood 

Nottingham .... 



Congressman. 



Convention. 



License. 



201 
59 
59 

128 

125 

182 

100 

220 

215 

330 

68 

42 

195 

104 

42 



416 

524 

525 

433 

180 

517 

175 

392 

351 

275 

289 

262 

266 

239 

115 

43 

248 

220 

35 

40 

98 

71 

21 

176 

126 

98 

207 

129 

113 



102 
54 
41 

113 

109 

181 

49 

123 

165 

185 

59 

29 

105 

86 

38 

58 

192 

347 

403 

352 

653 

497 

607 

489 

305 

280 

455 

294 

312 

216 

94 

43 

113 

23 

79 

88 

73 

42 

31 

293 

58 

99 

129 

87 

59 



3 

58 

58 
83 
40 
94 
77 
120 
29 
10 
45 
37 
29 
15 

156 

242 

272 

256 

355 

291 

361 

264 

175 

185 

270 

194 

180 

74 

46 

10 

99 

22 

17 

28 

40 

31 

6 

240 

33 

15 

73 

37 

24 



128 

107 
88 
50 

114 
46 

131 
55 
62 
62 
25 
30 
91 
40 
11 
69 
42 
34 
31 
24 
32 
13 
79 
49 
46 
66 
49 
57 



27 

16 

16 

103 



56 
44 
33 

128 
12 
15 
26 
13 
32 
3 

294 
17 
20 
54 
80 
70 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



381 



FIRST 

CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 



Ossipee 

Pelham 

Pembroke .... 

Pittsfield 

Plaistow 

Portsmouth — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Raymond 

Rochester — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 

Rollinsford ... 

Rye 

Salem 

Sanbornton ... 

Sandown 

Sandwich , 

Seabrook 

Somersworth— 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

South Hampton 

Strafford 

Stratham 

Tfvmworth 

Tilton 

uftonboro 

Wakefield 

Windham 

Wolfeboro 



Congressman. 



Convention. 



Totals 





"3 


t* 






t>» 


>> 











,a 


o 


o 


2 


o 


238 


165 


98 


62 


218 


254 1 


258 


281 


142 


52 


271 


312 


419 


476 


136 


265 | 


167 


184 


129 


115 


142 


167 


178 


138 


134 


181 


159 


112 


151 


217 


169 


119 


248 


168 


110 


144 


134 


139 1 


277 


108 ! 


138 


70 


43 


43 


135 


110 


172 


129 


90 


99 


93 


141 


75 


117 


52 


219 


27 


115 


39 


25 


132 


87 


71 


70 


140 


91 


232 


264 


98 


87 


175 


196 


71 


28 


367 


275 


826 


10.806 



9 

592 



1 91 

1 20 

1 185 

3 212 

1 21 

113 

4 219 

2 j 82 

.. ; 60 

1 39 

4 69 



36 
81 
38 

55 
50 

77 
97 
20 
93 
43 
11 
41 
40 

25 

32 
51 

140 
44 
7 
71 
30 
29 

127 
14 
69 
20 

185 



144 10.340 



License. 



34 

130 
46 
35 

17 
71 

?,n 

?,7 
10 

22 

29 
45 



114 



51 


159 


14 


78 


254 


164 


172 


286 


27 


109 



51 


122 


51 


39 


108 


34 


43 


7 


24 


13 


31 


17 


66 


82 


23 




26 




7 




9 




10 




28 


8 


41 


55 


23 


19 


31 


18 


108 


62 


44 


28 


41 


134 


33 


10 


115 


121 


6.407 





173 



108 
93 
166 
103 
45 
105 
156 



35 
111 

76 

75 
3ft0 

77 
130 

66 
387 



382 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SECOND 
CON- 
GRESSIONAL 
DISTRICT. 



Congressman. 



Convention. 



License. 



Acworth 69 

Alexandria 58 

Alstead 91 

Amherst 108 

Andover 145 

Antrim 181 

Ashland 176 

Bath 76 

Bennington 73 

Benton 11 

Berlin — 

Ward 1 180 

Ward 2 242 : 

Ward 3 208 

Ward 4 80 

Bethlehem 103 

Boscawen 133 

Bow 75 

Bradford 86 

Bridgewater 24 

Bristol 201 

Brookline 51 

Campton 115 

Canaan 224 

Carroll ! 81 

Charlestown ! 185 

Chesterfield 93 

Claremont i 659 

Clarksville 17 

Colebrook 233 

Columbia ' 88 

Concord- 
Ward 1 ; 186 

Ward 2 i 71 

Ward 3 136 

Ward 4 464 

Ward 5 332 

Ward 6 353 

Ward 7 503 

Ward 8 84 

Ward 9 132 

Cornish 123 

Croydon 51 

Dalton 58 

Danbury 84 

Deering 19 

Dorchester 33 

Dublin 52 



39 



66 
176 
114 
185 
121 
68 
23 

293 
286 
146 
100 
152 
114 

68 
117 

26 
133 

50 

66 
127 

88 
161 

42 
785 

45 
230 

42 

308 

99 

112 

386 

222 

337 

340 

218 

200 

61 

25 

47 

79 

64 

14 

37 



16 
16 
23 
45 
85 
41 
127 
46 
47 
1 

125 
152 
86 
44 
67 
52 
102 
72 



43 
35 
48 
46 
96 
31 

606 
2 

109 
15 



114 


54 


39 


18 


60 


28 


255 


124 


172 


72 


206 


100 


206 


108 


115 


22 


68 


36 


30 


44 


10 


29 


9 


29 


31 


41 


14 


11 


13 


13 


21 


16 



25 
39 
57 
31 
62 
103 
58 
35 
16 
13 

52 

39 

44 

21 

34 

76 

11 

54 

13 

46 

14 

30 

96 

23 

71 

25 j 
332 

22 ! 
130 

48 



18 
17 
63 
25 
170 
46 
95 
14 



31 
36 
14 
65 
4 
61 
29 
22 

128 
48 

126 
50 

554 
6 

232 
19 



48 

59 

120 

92 

137 

172 

211 

105 

61 

19 



119 
151 

70 
104 

22 
165 

63 

78 
155 

m 

179 
61 

880 
27 

289 
61 



104 
42 
67 
78 
22 
23 
45 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



383 



SECOND 
CON- 
GRESSIONAL 
DISTRICT. 
—Continued. 



Congressman. 







Convention. 



License. 






5 ; 54 

6 97 
6 | 135 

18 



15 
23 
6 

27 
81 
14 
40 
127 



158 
17 
97 
21 

109 
93 
41 
32 

128 
75 
32 

114 



70 



184 
41 



304 
21 



17 
33 

12 
1 

63 
19 
34 
21 
24 

22 
34 
44 
18 
71 
21 
48 
23 
22 
57 
13 
38 

113 
30 

209 

7 

84 

22 

139 
77 
22 
41 
74 
76 
43 

48 
34 
46 
29 
37 

201 
16 
31 

268 
11 



38 
65 
18 
31 
16 
16 

105 
23 
43 
48 
33 

140 
11 

100 
4 

238 

189 
24 
13 
35 

131 
56 



26 
59 
26 
4 
145 
15 
80 
51 
47 



55 

216 

32 

96 

41 

57 

124 

32 

89 

245 

69 

485 

28 

191 

68 

264 

196 

74 

101 

227 

209 

124 



138 


471 


12 


54 


9 


39 


304 


677 


21 


39 



384 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SECOND 
CON- 
GRESSIONAL 
DISTRICT. 
—Continued. 



Congressman. 



Convention. 



Lincoln 48 

Lisbon I 259 

Littleton 480 

Livermore 6 

Lyman 31 

Lyme ' 139 

Lyndeborough 101 

Marlborough 171 

Marlow 42 

Mason 32 

Milan 82 

Milford 435 

Monroe 46 

Mont Vernon ! 47 

Nashua- 
Ward 1 445 

Ward 2 '■ 279 

Ward 3 115 

Ward 4 , 141 

Ward 5 70 

Ward 6 162 

Ward 7 ! 346 

Ward 8 ■ 425 

Ward 9 171 

Nelson 31 

New Boston ' 135 

Newbury 63 

New Ipswich 73 

New London , 119 

Newport i 547 

Northumberland ... ! 195 

Orange ' 20 

Orford 93 

Peterborough 231 

Piermont 70 

Pittsburg ; 79 

Plainfield 115 

Plymouth 316 

Randolph 13 

Richmond 43 

Rindge 105 

Roxbury ! 7 

Rumney ' 89 

Salisbury 59 

Sharon 9 

Shelbnrne 25 

Springfield 69 

Stark 41 



35 

346 
571 
2 
59 
59 
48 
89 
28 
29 
66 
240 
26 
29 

178 
182 
269 
110 

63 
147 
393 
485 
311 

11 



65 

27 

90 

319 

215 

19 

63 

237 

51 

51 

108 

266 

10 

32 

34 

3 

118 

62 

3 

16 
45 
69 



1 I 

i I 



134 

67 

19 

84 

276 

288 

180 

14 

50 

44 

20 

71 

191 

170 

3 

16 

157 

16 

7 

35 

120 

3 

15 

28 

5 

31 
11 
4 
8 
20 
10 







<D 


o 


*H 


£ 


18 


17 


86 


152 


306 


169 


6 




9 


33 


40 


49 


37 


37 


46 


59 


21 


13 


9 


18 


21 


54 


344 


144 


8 


31 


14 


18 


235 


85 


121 


35 



License. 



74 
73 
32 
6 
57 
26 
27 
34 

243 
86 
11 
37 

102 
30 



143 
3 

17 

33 

3 

45 

33 

3 

5 

21 

43 



OJ 


6 


t* 


ft 


2 


59 


80 


304 


188 


525 


4 


2 


8 


35 


20 


109 


13 


81 


37 


152 


31 


35 


19 


29 


23 


93 


213 


452 


6 


42 


10 
.... 


33 


'"i 


"27 


79 


102 


52 


45 


18 


66 


20 


122 


198 


597 


225 


233 


9 


14 


36 


57 


157 


253 


15 


54 


24 


86 


31 


123 


96 


293 


3 


9 


20 


49 


8 


77 


3 


7 


25 


104 


12 


62 


9 


4 




22 


20 


38 


26 


55 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



385 



SECOND 
CON- 
GRESSIONAL 
DISTRICT. 
—Concluded. 



tewartstown 

toddard 

tratf ord 

ullivan 

unapee 

urry 

utton 

wanzey 

emple 

hornton 

roy 

nity 

falpole 

Earner 

r arren 

r ashington ....... 

r aterville 

eare 

ebster 

entworth 

entworth's Loc'n 

estmoreland 

hitefield 

lmot 

ilton 

inchester 

indsor 

oodstock 

Totals 



Congressman. 



128 ! 
24 
48 
38 j 

132 
33 i 
96 

155 
34 
72 
93 | 
64' 

224 

201 

80 

42 

7 

163 

66 

40 

3 

77 

232 
74! 

153 

277 

4 

75 



91 : 

18! 

147 

9 

114 i 

13 

93 
170 

17 

60 
103 

45 
266 
129 

75 

31 

185 

51 

78 
9 

45 
208 

73 

198 

210 

3 

64 



Convention. 



License. 



33 

13 
72 

7 
64 1 

5 
47 i 
88 
14 
20 
68 
19 
133 
90 
41 
24 

7 
70 
26 
26 

1 

14 

94 

27 ! 

130 

280 

1 
43 



43 
10 
42 
21 
69 
15 
35 
69 
13 
11 
48 
30 
146 
55 
30 
18 

"*79 
20 
21 

"24 

70 
22 
61 
107 
3 
34 



113 
13 
88 

3 
64 

6 
35 
116 

1 

3 
42 
28 
241 
41 
16 
28 

'129 



1 

20 
91 
19 
104 
237 
1 
15 



76 
23 

108 
37 

164 
31 
92 

175 
38 
54 

136 
64 

300 

160 

84 

37 

7 

171 

62 

68 

5 

56 

237 
65 

214 

292 
5 

100 



22,296 20,145 30 570 124 11,249 1 8,118 



386 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



COUNCILOR 

DISTRICT 

No. 1. 



Albany 

Alexandria 

Ashland 

Bartlett 

Bath 

Benton 

Berlin — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Bethlehem 

Bridgewater ... 

Bristol 

Campton 

Canaan 

Carroll 

Chatham 

Clarksville 

Colebrook 

Columbia 

Conway 

Dalton 

Dorchester 

Dnmmer 

Easton 

Eaton 

Effingham 

Ellsworth 

Enfield 

Errol 

Pranconia 

Freedom 

Gorham 

Grafton 

Groton 

Hart's Location 

Hanover 

Haverhill 

Hebron 

Holderness 

Jackson 



12 

58 
177 
86 
93 
14 

171 

244 

196 

71 

103 

24 

194 

113 

223 

83 

26 

21 

343 

103 

424 

58 

32 

19 

12 

54 

90 

7 

189 

20 

52 

58 

145 

89 

25 

2 

238 

500 

18 

112 

55 



id 




V. 


„j 


ft 










<D 


>, 


rC 








c3 




o 


pq 


G 


n 




23 








80 




2 


178 




1 


127 


1 


2 


94 






19 






295 




25 


290 




13 


154 


1 


65 


105 




22 


141 




2 


26 






129 




i 


62 




9 


122 




86 


1 


36 




40 


... | 




146 






31 






344 




1 


45 






14 






21 


... 




32 






35 






56 








4 








113 








33 








74 








98 








221 




i 


) 


78 




■ 




19 








2 








167 




2 


287 




3 


| 28 


1 


3 


68 






58 


1 







COUNCILOR 
DISTRICT 
No. 1.— Con- 
cluded. 



Jefferson 

Lancaster 

Landaff 

Lebanon 

Lincoln 

Lisbon 

Littleton 

Livermore 

Lyman 

Lyme 

Madison 

Milan 

Northumberland . 

Monroe 

Northumberland . 

Orange 

Orford 

Ossipee 

Piermont 

Pittsburg 

Plymouth 

Randolph 

Rumney 

Sandwich 

Shelburne 

Stark 

Stewartstown ... 

Stratford 

Tamworth 

Thornton 

Tuftonboro 

Warren 

Waterville 

Wentworth 

W'tworth's Lc'n 

Whitefield 

Wolf^boro 

Woodstock 

Totals 





ni 




to 


u 


jj 


ft 


. 


03 


u 
08 




o 


6 


pq 


cb 


w 


135 


123 






436 


277 




1 


36 


59 


l 




603 


491 




2 


51 


33 






298 


285 






486 


559 




7 


4 


2 






35 


46 






137 


56 






87 


57 






83 


62 




1 


210 


202 




25 


47 


23 






210 


202 




25 


20 


19 






93 


59 






237 


161 






70 


52 






91 


42 






323 


249 




5 


11 


11 






97 


107 




2 


128 


104 




1 


26 


16 




1 


42 


68 


l 


2 


148 


77 


l 




65 


135 






134 


89 






74 


56 




2 


97 


86 




1 


-79 


71 






7 








42 


75 






3 


9 






251 


181 




2 


358 


263 




9 


76 


63 






9,894 


8,272 


7 


240 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



387 



50 
206 
138 
135 
138 
91 
33 
107 
138 

377 

358 

344 

416 

16 

111 

54 

117 

596 

437 

72 

111 

127 

98 

103 

229 

92 

53 

126 

66 

46 

43 

257 

39 

32 

67 

22 



35 

162 
138 
73 
133 
37 
32 
23 
77 

170 

223 

130 

261 

185 

68 

64 

100 

270 

252 

24 

67 

108 
42 
57 

121 
12 
40 

110 
58 
36 
43 

no 

88 
82 
44 
32 



COUNCILOR 

DISTRICT NO. 2. 

—Concluded. 



Newmarket 

Newton 

North Hampton. 

Northwood 

Nottingham 

Plaistow 

Portsmouth — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Rochester — 

Ward 1 



Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 

Rollinsford .... 

Rye 

Sandown 

Seabrook 

Somersworth — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

South Hampton. 

Strafford 

Stratham 

Wakefield 



Totals 



174 
127 
97 
136 
113 
131 

233 
401 
129 
149 
125 

202 
154 
173 
188 
183 
271 
114 
138 
40 
137 

94 
96 
72 
47 
21 
40 

135 
69 

176 

9,610 



293 
52 
97 
79 
55 
58 

341 
499 
270 
199 
114 

118 
166 

99 
188 
109 
139 
143 
139 

39 
133 

97 

138 

118 

218 

116 

24 

82 

69 

191 

7,990 



388 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



COUNCILOR 

DISTRICT 

NO. 3. 



Auburn 

Candia 

Chester 

Derry 

Hooksett ... 
Londonderry- 
Manchester— 

Ward 1 .. 

Ward 2 .. 

Ward 3 .. 

Ward 4 .. 

Ward 5 .. 

Ward 6 .. 

Ward 7 .. 



M 


^ 


d 




















Pi 

a 


u 






<x> 






o 


<s 






o 


Hi 


> 


^ 


O 


74 


71 






114 


92 




3 


115 


44 






544 


593 




9 


155 


165 




1 


191 


89 






444 


148 


4 


3 


566 


291 




9 


530 


372 




27 


454 


329 


1 


19 


144 


689 


1 


24 


519 


480 


3 


27. 


117 


666 


1 3 


1 8 



COUNCILOR 
DISTRICT 

NO. 3. 
— Concluded. 



Manchester 
Ward 8 . 
Ward 9 , 
Ward 10 
Ward 11 
Ward 12 
Ward 13 
Raymond . , 

Salem 

Windham . 

Totals . 



354 
294 
309 
200 
202 
144 



284 
239 
412 
357 
377 
163 
82 
27 



6,186 6,461 13 



33: 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



389 



1 .... 

2 .... 

3 .... 

4 .... 

5 .... 
Id .... 

>orough 
rough 



106 

182 

132 

73 

49 

93 

19 

60 

93 

85 

53 

305 

44 

76 

66 

62 

311 

204 

124 

201 

173 



93 
63 
110 
87 

<;7 

46 

41 

63 

25 

46 

44 

35 

247 

64 

156 

87 

66 

213 

131 

53 

100 

177 



302 


173 


234 


116 


255 


121 


198 


83 


165 


161 


43 


29 


102 


45 


160 


89 


42 


28 


27 


27 


122 


78 


446 


212 



COUNCILOR 
DISTRICT 

NO. 4. 
—Concluded. 



Mont Vernon. 
Nashua — 

Ward 1 .... 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 .... 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 .... 

Ward 7 

Ward 8 

Ward 9 

Nelson 

New Boston. . . 
New Ipswich. 

Pelham 

Peterborough 

Richmond 

Rindge 

Roxbury 

Sharon 

Stoddard 

Sullivan 

Surry 

Swanzey 

Temple 

Troy 

Walpole 

Weare 

Westmoreland 

Wilton 

Winchester . .. 
Windsor 



Totals 



430 
271 
117 
126 

62 
128 
315 
387 
167 

29 
133 

76 

93 
249 

46 
105 



25 

36 

30 

151 

27 

100 

211 

169 

75 

149 

277 

3 



20 

172 

160 

241 

112 

64 

150 

387 

459 

259 

11 

84 

26 

66 

211 

27 

30 

3 

4 

20 

11 

15 

174 

20 

96 

280 

178 

47 

184 

203 

4 



10 



8,747 



6,903 



11 234 



390 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



COUNCILOR 

DISTRICT 

NO. 6. 


o 

u 

m 

O 


3 


ft 

6 


m 

W 


COUNCILOR 
DISTRICT 

NO. 5. 
—Concluded. 


6 
O 

u 

O 


n3 
>> 

3 


ft 

"o 
u 

03 


t 


Acworth 


70 
88 

144 

143 
78 
94 
71 
48 

182 
87 

696 

203 

75 

144 

492 

350 

359 

507 

87 

119 

124 

53 

85 

77 

97 

187 
150 
264 


38 

114 

• 177 

101 

64 
107 

72 

51 
154 

78 
699 

282 

95 

101 

357 

199 

320 

320 

218 

209 

57 

22 

81 

39 

81 

102 
246 
221 
28 
38 
149 
34 


"i 
"i 

"3 
"2 


"i 
1 

"i 

22 

3 
2 

28 
17 
5 
5 
14 
2 
9 

8 
13 
15 

"4 


Hopkinton 


230 
39 

118 

18ft 


195 
32 

110 
169 

K9 


1 

"i 




Allenstown 






Laconia — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 




Boscawen 




Bradford 


Ward 3 . <*4 




Canterbury 

Center Harbor .. . 

Charlestown 

Chichester 

Claremont 

Concord — 


Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 

Lempster 

Loudon 

Meredith 


211 j 117 
205 163 
331 j 183 

42i 45 
105 86 
266 203 

941 72 
122; 84 

68 59 
548 ana 


L 
1) 
( 


Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 


New Hampton . . 

New London 

Newbury 


" 


Ward 5 

Ward 6 

Ward 7 


Northfield .... 

Pembroke 

Pittsfield 


207 
213 
265 
116 

65 
140 

71 
133 
101 


123 

258 

260 

100 

56 

68 

43 

107 

90 


] 
11 


Ward 8 

Ward 9 


Plainfleld 

Salisbury 

Sanbornton 

Springfield 








Danbury 




Dunbarton 


Sutton 




Epsom 


Tilton 


233 9K« 


s 


Franklin — 


Unity 


65 

228 
43 
67 
74 


44 
104 
31 
50 
70 




Ward 1 






Ward 2 

Ward 3 


Washington 


1 




40 

37 

198 

96 


Wilmot 

Totals 




Grantham 




10,115 


8,387 


9 


<>% 


Hill ! 

















NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



391 



FIRST 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 



Dummer 

Errol 

Gorham 

Milan 

Randolph 

Shelburne 

Wentworth's Loc'n 









T3 


® 








& 


h 






3 


c3 

ft 


13 


29 


19 


40 


202 


184 


75 


73 


12 


11 


28 


14 


.... 


12 



FIRST 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 



Berlin — 
Ward 1 
Ward 2 
Ward 3 
Ward 4 

Totals 



165 
205 
166 



1,448 



333 
346 
204 
129 



1,675 155 



SECOND 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 


h 

CD 


CO 

83 
3 


Marshal], d. 
Glessner, p. 


SECOND 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

— Concluded. 


u 

^" 

CD 
C 
CO 
CO 
© 

3 


•6 

CO 

3 


d 

c 

CO 
CO 

s 


Bethlehem 


118 
83 
7 

125 
69 
58 
56 

132 

360 


139 ... 

86 ... 

55 ... 
416 ... 

62 ... 

45 ... 

73 ... 
132 . . . 
378 ... 


Northumberland 


161 
51 
37 
93 
45 

238 


266 
89 
72 
133 
156 
196 




Carroll 




Clarksville 


Stark . 


1 
1 




Stewartstown 


Columbia 


Dalton 


Whitefield 






Totals 




Jefferson 


1,633 


2,298 


2 


Lancaster 











392 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 











o 










,4 
O 


THIRD 




-d 




ft 


THIRD 




"6 




ft 


SENATORIAL 








. 


SENATORIAL 




. 




„ 


DISTRICT. 


M 





ft 


o 


DISTRICT. 


h 


a 

o 


p. 


el 




& 


•£ 


£ 


bG 


— Concluded. 


£ 


EQ 


^ 


bo 














© 






I 

l5 




a 


e3 


03 






03 





03 




w. 


« 


W 


w 




OQ 


s 


CQ 


to 


Bath 


86 


108 




Lisbon 


298 


291 


2 




13 

118 


20 
68 








36 
43 


56 
25 




1 


Campton 


Monroe 


1 




12 


32 






Plymouth 


327 


260 




fi 


Haverhill 


497 
121 


307 
61 




5 
2 


68 
74 


55 
58 






Holderness 


Thornton 




Landaff 


36 


60 


1 






76 


66 




i 




461 
63 


597 
24 






Totals 












2,329 


! 2,088 


1 


17 







FOURTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 



Albany 

Bartlett 

Brookfield 

Chatham 

Conway 

Eaton 

Effingham 

Freedom 

Hart's Location 

Jackson 

Livermore 



85 
37 
26 
415 
55 
91 
56 

2 
55 

4 



55 



60 



FOURTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 



Moultonborough 

Madison 

Ossipee 

Sandwich 

Tamworth , 

Tuftonboro 

Wakefield 

Waterville 

Wolf eboro 

Totals 



221 

88 

240 

130 

132 

97 

190 

7 



,301 



108 



87 
185 



264 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



393 



FIFTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 



Ashland 

Alexandria 
Bridgewater 

Bristol 

Canaan 

Dorchester . 
Ellsworth . . 

Enfield 

Grafton 

Groton 

Hanover . . . 



176 
57 
23 

200 

215 

32 

7 

200 
84 
28 

227 



FIFTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded, 



Hebron 

Lebanon 

Lyme 

New Hampton 

Orange 

Orford 

Rnmney 

Warren 

Wentworth . . . 

Totals 



18 

581 
135 
89 
19 
92 
94 
78 
42 



29 
523 
59 
77 
22 
61 
108 
73 
75 



2,397 



SIXTH 








SIXTH 








SENATORIAL 








SENATORIAL 








DISTRICT. 


i-, 






DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 


u 








u 


t) 






•£ 


, -6 


« 




0> 

o 


M 
o 
O 


13 




O 


o 
O 


1-3 




202 
137 
122 
52 
119 
131 


177 
147 
155 
49 
72 
109 


1 

2 

"i 


Laconia — 
Ward 3 


105 
212 
201 
327 
246 
138 


47 
127 
176 
190 
213 

73 






2 
11 

18 
8 
4 
3 




Ward 4 


Center Harbor 


Ward 5 


Gilford 


Ward 6 . 


Gilmanton 




Laconia — 


Sanbornton 


Ward 1 . 


118 


116 












Ward 2 


182 


186 


7 


Totals 


2,292 


1,836 


r 







394 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SEVENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 



Andover . 
Boscawen 
Concord — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 
Canterbury 
Danbury . 
Franklin — 

Ward 1 . 

Ward 2 



142 
145 

194 
71 

75 



182 
153 



SEVENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 



Franklin — 

Ward 3 

Hill 


259 
98 
121 
223 
260 
74 


239 
34 


New London 

Northfield 

Tilton 

Wilmot 

Totals 


82 

112 

238 

69 


2,085 


1,970 



EIGHTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 


h 

a 

o 

o3 
W 


i 

u 
D 


EIGHTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 


a 

o 

H 

pq 


o 
u 

u 
03 

O 


Acworth 


69 

196 

600 

126 

53 

42 

42 

40 

51 


43 
161 
920 
59 
28 
38 
29 
32 
34 


Newport 

Plainfield 


576 

126 

70 

151 

53 

49 


298 
94 




Springfield 


42 




96 




Unity 


64 






29 




Totals 






2,244 


1,967 


Lempster 





NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



395 



NINTH 








NINTH 








SENATORIAL 




*d 




SENATORIAL 








DISTRICT. 






DISTRICT. 










M 


e 


ft 


— Concluded. 


h 


t 


ft 

« 




M 


o 






*h 


c 


fc 






,Q 








,fi 


9 




r^ 


C 


M 




^ 




^ 






c3 


ee 




cS 




e3 




M 


m 


PQ 




PQ 


V. 


M 




186 
94 


110 
112 






217 
64 


202 
63 


2 




Newbury 

Salisbury 




Concord- 








54 


61 




Ward 3 


140 
515 

25 


101 
293 

62 






96 

214 

65 


88 

110 

52 




Ward 7 






Deering 






92 
206 
354 


41 
140 
183 






3 


3 






Totals 




Hillsborough 


2,325 


1,621 


2 







TENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 





-d 


M 


>i 




>H 






eS 


d 


w 


M 



Alstead ... 
Chesterfield 

Gilsum 

Keene — 

Ward 1 . 

Ward 2 . 

Ward 3 . 

Ward 4 . 

Ward 5 . 
Marlow .... 



92 


84 


89 


41 


52 


36 


316 


164 


247 


105 


265 


111 


199 


73 


170 


158 


42 


28 



TENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 



Nelson 

Roxbury 

Stoddard 

Sullivan 

Surry 

Walpole 

Westmoreland 



Totals 



"3 .5 



k J 



31 


11 


8 


6 


4 




24 


18 


8 


37 


9 


2 


32 


13 




225 


272 




71 


49 


4 


1,898 


1,176 


86 



396 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



ELEVENTH 








ELEVENTH 








SENATORIAL 








SENATORIAL 








DISTRICT. 


to 




d 


DISTRICT. 


to 




pi, 




to 


Xi 




— Concluded. 




<xt 


- 




o 




© 




<D 








A 


CO 


A 




A 
























<s 








<o 


S 






ft 


pq 


ft 




s 


pq 


ft 


Bennington 


74 


68 






48 


28 




59 


24 






110 


29 




Fitzwilliam, 

Hancock 

Harrisville 

Hinsdale 

Jaffrey 


102 


35 






8 


4 




64 


87 






154 


170 




54 


82 






101 


100 




212 


124 






278 


198 




185 


174 


















Marlborough 

Peterborough 


172 


80 




Totals 


1,873 


1,416 


9 


252 


213 


2 







TWELFTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 


to 

to 

03 

w 


*6 

w 

PQ 


TWELFTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

— Concluded. 


to' 

a 


Is 

pq 




105 
50 
41 
72 

139 
92 
28 

123 

391 


68 
46 
69 

162 
51 
56 
32 
80 

286 


Mont Vernon 

Nashua- 
Ward 1 


44 

435 

243 

73 

28 
99 


32 








178 




Ward 2 


179 


Hollis 




31 


Lyndeborough 




21 


Wilton 


259 


Merrimack 

Milf ord 


Total 




1,963 


1,550 











NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



397 



THIRTEENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 


.2 

c 


Sfcl 
o 
O 


d 
13 

08 

"C 


THIRTEENTH 
SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 


.* 

as 
,4 

Eh 


Coffey, d. 


d 

c3 
*C 

a> 

,4 

Eh 


Nashua- 
Ward 3 


203 
130 
56 
144 
315 


175 
118 
76 
155 
415 


2 
1 


Nashua — 
Ward 8 


460 435 


1 


Ward 4 


Ward 9 . 


329 


167 






Totals 




Ward 6 


1,637 


1,541 


4 


Ward 7 





FOURTEENTH 








FOURTEENTH 








SENATORIAL 




is 




SENATORIAL 




n6 




DISTRICT. 


M 


. 


D 


DISTRICT. 


u 




d 






f3 




—Concluded. 




J-l 








M 


u 






bt) 






rt 


s 


JS 






a 






W 


aj 


c 










fc 


PM 


& 




fe 


Ah 


fe 


Allenstown 


71 


134 




Loudon 


102 


89 


1 


Bedford 


131 
75 
92 
79 
75 

295 


89 
68 
75 
39 
114 


"i 


New Boston 

Pembroke 


134 

163 
291 

172 


85 
316 

265 
176 










Pittsfield 
















Goffstown 


254 




Totals 


1,833 


1.865 


? 


Hooksett 


153 


161 













398 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



FIFTEENTH 






FIFTEENTH 






SENATORIAL 


h 




SENATORIAL 


Fh 




DISTRICT. 


- 


ii 


DISTRICT. 


„ 






o 


— Concluded. 


a 


-« 




w 






FH 


.S 






§ 




c3 

Ph 



<1 


Concord- 






Concord- 






Ward 4 


440 
330 


419 
230 
357 


Ward 9 


119 


215 


Ward 5 




Ward 6 


333 


Totals 


. 1,297 


1,451 


Ward 8 


75 


* 









SIXTEENTH 






SIXTEENTH 






SENATORIAL 






SENATORIAL 






DISTRICT. 






DISTRICT. 


h 






»q 




—Concluded. 


_? 








.2 






_rt 




^ 




< 






<j 


Manchester- 






Manchester — 






Ward 1 


458 
553 


148 
303 


Ward 9 


371 


252 


Ward 2 


Totals 




1,382 


703 







NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



399 



SEVENTEENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 


a 

u 


Fahey, d. 


SEVENTEENTH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

—Concluded. 


"3 

c 

P^ 


.4 


Manchester — 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 


581 
456 


337 
317 


Manchester — 
Ward 10 

Totals 


305 


227 


1,342 


881 









EIGHTEENTH 






EIGHTEENTH 






SENATORIAL 






SENATORIAL 






DISTRICT. 


.. 




DISTRICT. 


• 






a 


^ 


—Concluded. 


ti 


nd 




o 


c3 




o 

w 


88 




.S 


,3 




.2 


43 




pq 


«} 




pq 


cc 


Manchester- 






Manchester — 






Ward 5 


187 


644 


Ward 11 


305 


415 


Ward 7 


215 
394 


566 
436 


Totals 






Ward 8 


1,101 


2 061 









400 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



NINETEENTH 






NINETEENTH 






SENATORIAL 




T3 


SENATORIAL 




^ 


DISTRICT. 


u 




DISTRICT. 


u 








u 


—Concluded. 


. 


u 






bO 






bo 






c 




<D 


a 




S 


03 




8 


A 










Q 






P 


pq 




R 


pq 


Manchester — 






Manchester — 






Ward 12 


267 


305 


Ward 13 

Totals 


264 


327 








531 


632 









TWENTIETH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 




CO 

PQ 


ft 

eg 

H 


TWENTIETH 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

— Concluded. 


u 

w 


re 

CD 

"c3 

pq 


ft 

u 
c3 

W 


Farmington 


433 
43 

283 
40 

159 
123 
155 
140 
163 
226 


263 

43 
96 

87 

161 
194 
114 
224 
126 
179 




Somersworth — 
Ward 1 


94 
92 
71 
47 
21 
132 


97 
138 
118 
214 
116 

85 






Ward 2 






Ward 3 






Ward 4 




Ward 1 


Ward 5 


1 


Ward 2 








Totals 




Ward 4 


2,212 


2,255 


1 


Ward 5 






Ward 6 . . 





NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



401 



TWENTY-FIRST 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 


Leighton, r. 


•6 

o 


TWENTY-FIRST 

SENATORIAL 

DISTRICT. 

— Concluded. 


o 


Caswell, d. 




127 

340 
359 
274 
359 
22 


84 

223 
245 
211 
325 
184 




110 
67 
45 

105 


74 






59 


Ward 1 




38 


Ward 2 . , 




150 


Ward 3 


Totals 




Ward 4 


1 1,808 


1 1,593 


Ward 5 






I 



TWENTY- 








TWENTY- 








SECOND 








SECOND 








SENATORIAL 








SENATORIAL 








DISTRICT. 


h 




P. 


DISTRICT. 


u 




P. 




. 


b£ 


. 


— Concluded. 


. 


bo 


. 




nS 





n3 




•Xi 


c 


T? 




>> 


2 


l>> 




>, 


3 


t>» 




O 


O 


o 




o 


o 


o 




PQ 


t» 


m 




pq 


>H 


PP 




76 
102 


79 
106 




Northwood 

Nottingham 


128 
110 


87 
58 




Candia 






105 
134 

486 


63 
87 

766 






92 
145 
268 


80 
168 
121 










Derry 


Salem 






210 
44 
191 


99 
28 
130 






73 


32 


1 




Totals 




Londonderry 

Manchester — 


2,648 


2 415 


3 














Ward 6 


484 


511 


1 2 















402 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



TWENTY- 
THIRD 
SENATORIAL 
DISTRICT. 


02 

O 


hi) 


ft 

02 

.9 
o 


TWENTY- 
THIRD 
SENATORIAL 
DISTRICT. 
—Concluded. 


6 

.5 

'o 
C 


CO 

'eg 
bfi 

M 


ft 

8 

"o 




52 

90 
120 

50 
114 
596 

77 
110 
239 

89 

54 


33 

38 

15 

65 

194 

265 

24 

52 

122 

15 

44 


"i 




132 

67 
128 

98 
148 

42 
132 

44 


109 
44 
54 
95 
46 
44 

136 
20 


















East Kingston 


North Hampton 


















South Hampton 

Totals 








1 


Hampton Falls 


2,382 


1,415 












1 



TWENTY- 
FOURTH 
SENATORIAL 
DISTRICT. 


Si 

03 

D 


Hi 


ft 

<£ 

CD 
00 


TWENTY- 
FOURTH 
SENATORIAL 
DISTRICT. 
— Concluded. 


03 


<o 
fan 

c3 

P* 


ft 
© 

'u 




93 

36 

22 

178 

265 
461 
152 


48 

81 

34 

291 

297 
389 
255 


1 

32 

78 
23 


Portsmouth — 
Ward 4 


184 
143 
141 

67 


165 
105 
124 

74 






18 




Ward 5 


7 




Rye 


12 






1 


Ward 1 


Totals 




Ward 2 


1,742 


1,863 


172 


Ward 3 











NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



403 



REPRESENTATIVES TO THE GENERAL COURT. 



Acworth — 

March Clark, d 

Alger E. Hemphill, r 

James F. Eaton, n. p 

Alexandria — 

Joel S. Gray, d 

Willie H. Patten, r 

Allen stown — 

Fred S. Eastman, r 

Walter W. Kenison, d. . . . 
Alstead — 

Henry C. Metcalf, d 

Chauncey J. Newell, r 

Leslie P. Forristall, n. p. . 
Alton — 

William R. Clongh, r. & p. 

Charles H. McDuffee, d. . . 
Amherst — 

Jonathan S. Lewis, r. & p. 

William W. Sloan, d ..... . 

And over — 

George E. Eastman, d 

Vivian S. Quimby, r 

Antrim — 

Charles D. White, d 

Charles S. Abbott, r. & p. 

Charles R. Jameson, ind. . 
Ashland — 

Theron B. A. Baker, d. . . . 

Ellis G. Gammons, r. & p. 
Atkinson — 

Herbert N. Sawyer, r. 

Jay W. Stickney, n. j 

Elmer E. Corley, n. i 
Auburn — 

Willard H. Griffin, d . . 

Edward C. Griffin, r . . 
Barnstead — 

George J. Whitney, r. 

Charles A. Holmes, d. 
Barrington — 

Frank McDaniel, r. & d. 
Bartlett — 

Austin L. Stillings, d 

Edward B. Cobb, r 



72 

37 

4 

85 
63 

121 
90 

111 

77 
1 

209 
174 

107 
76 

184 
143 

157 

141 

5 

190 
176 

55 
5 
1 

84 

82 

147 
145 

209 

114 
112 



Bath — 

Chester Abbott, r 

Ira E. Deming, d 

(no choice) 
Bedford- 
William B. French, r. . . 
Thomas E. Barr, d. . . . 
Belmont — 

Jason H. Cotton, d 

Charles E. Small, r. . . . 
Bennington — 

Herbert A. Eaton, r. . . . 
Berlin — 
Ward 1 — 

Waldo Babson, d.... 
Arthur P. Smyth, d. . 

Joseph Aubin, d 

Gilman C. Bradbury, r 
Geo. E. Lambert, r. & 
Wilbert L. Campbell, r 
Ward 2 — 

Joseph W. Gonya, d. 
William G. Dupont, 
George H. Gagne, d. 
Holman A. Drew, r. £ 
John T. Moran, d. . 
Henry E. Bailey, r. 
Ward 3— 

Octave J. Lambert, r 
Andrew P. Bergquist, 
Paul W. Burbank, r. 

Scattering 

Ward 4 — 

Arthur J. Letourneau, d 

Luke H. Martin, r 

Bethlehem — 

Walter H. Clark, d. . . 
Benjamin Tucker, r. . 
Boscawen — 

Guy H. Hubbard, r. . 
George F. Brown, d. . 
Bow — 

Fred H. Clough, d . . . 
Charles S. Goodrich, r 



99 
99 



156 
90 



140 
136 



SO 



295 
294 
284 
187 
178 
175 

307 
279 
278 
253 
242 
232 

224 
212 
210 



101 
83 



185 
69 



138 
109 



404 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Bradford — 

Hugh Corrigan, d 110 

Willis N. Bailey, r 94 

Brentwood — 

Burton L. Smith, r 93 

George A. Lyford, d 39 

Bristol — 

John S. Conner, d 177 

Roy R. Smith, r 175 

Brookline — 

Walter E. Corey, r 58 

George M. Rockwood, d. . . 45 

Campton — 

Samuel P. Robie, r 125 

Heber K. Smith, d 72 

Canaan — 

William E. Shaw, r 189 

Arthur W. Hutchinson, d. . 172 

Candia — 

Benjamin F. Lang, d. . . . 132 

Frank L. McDuffee, r 86 

Canterbury — 

Leroy A. Glines, r. & d. . 135 

Carroll — 

Edward W. Burns, d . . . . 89 

Leon G. Hunt, r 82 

Center Harbor — 

Leonard B. Morrill, r. & d. 104 

Charlestown — 

William H. Gilson, r 193 

Gilbert L. Richardson, d. . 188 

Chester — 

George E. Gillingham, r. . 122 

Scattering 2 

Chesterfield — 

Harold E. Randall, r 92 

Scattering 1 

Chichester — 

Marshall S. Sanborn, r. . . 92 

Edward S. Edmunds, d. . . 76 

Claremont — 

Robert E. Gould, d 874 

Edwin A. Thomas, d 817 

Edgar A. Noyes, r 769 

Edward J. Rossiter, r. . . . 761 

Orra S. Bugbee, d 754 

Herbert C. Chandler, d 743 

Fred E. Coy, d 705 



Romeo A. Quimby, r 


679 


David R. Roys, r 


636 


Patrick J. Sheridan, d. . . 


638 


Louis Proven cher, r 


599 


Herbert B. Converse, r. . . . 


572 


Colebrook — 




Guy B. Trask, r 


366 


John H. Finley, r 


308 


Alfred C. Edwards, d 


201 


Osgood F. Covell, d 


89 


Kelsea Knapp, proh. . . . 


46 


George M. Weeks, proh. . . . 


45 


Columbia — 




William Gray, r 


91 


Elmer E. Barnett, d 


41 


Concord — 




Ward 1— 




Lawrence J. Keenan, d. 


277 


William F. Hoyt, d 


252 


Elmer U. Sargent, r. . . . 


245 


Charles H. Barnett, r. . 


214 


Ward 2 — 




Frank P. Curtis, d 


94 


Clarence I. Tibbetts, r. . 


91 


Ward 3 — 




Robert C. Murchie, d. . . 


139 


Henry M. Richardson, r. 


134 


Ward 4— 




Herbert H. Wright, r . . . 


524 


Ira Leon Evans, r 


512 


Eugene W. Leach, r & p. 


500 


Thomas A. Foley, d. . . . 


337 


Edward K. Webster, d. . 


321 


Robert M. Jordan, d . . . . 


293 


Scattering 


3 


Ward 5 — 




Arthur P. Morrill, r. . . . 


371 


Benjamin W. Couch, r. . 


340 


James Shepard Norris, d. 


189 


Dion C. Wingate, d. . . . 


185 


Scattering 


1 


Ward 6— 




Clarence L. Clark, d. . . . 


350 


Arthur E. Dole, r 


346 


Fred B. Taylor, d 


345 


Henry A. Kimball, r . . . 


332 


Arthur D. Fosgate, r. . . . 


328 


George N. Crockett, d . . 


322 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



4:05 



Ward 7 — 

John G. Winant, r 532 

Julius Percy Holbrook, r. 523 

Walter H. Beane, r 497 

George H. Curtis, d 288 

Frank E. Loveren, d. . . . 272 

Ralph W. Tuttle, d 268 

Ward 8 — 

William A. Lee, d 210 

Perley B. Phillips, r. . . . 93 
Ward 9 — 

William J. Ahern, d 203 

James J. Gannon, d. . . . 192 

Alfred L. Trenoweth, r. . 131 

James Burbeck, r 120 

Conway — 

Charles E. Poole, r 457 

William R. Carter, d 453 

Albert S. Pollard, r 418 

Harry S. Patten, r 364 

Horace S. Mason, d 345 

George H. Heath, d 334 

Cornish — 

William E. Beaman, r. . . . 118 

Arthur P. Thrasher, d 67 

Croydon — 

Dana S. Gross, r. & p. . . . 54 

Homer P. Fletcher, d 27 

Dalton — 

Amos L. Brown, r 61 

Ernest E. Whitcomb, d 45 

Danbury — 

Burt W. Dean, d 86 

Frank A. Martin, r 84 

Deerfield — 

Joseph W. Sanborn, r. . . . 144 

George H. Robinson, d. . . 84 
Deering — 

Harland C. Smith, ind. ... 56 

Harry D. Locke, d. & r. . . 40 
Derry — 

Henry T. Wheeler, d 722 

Warren P. Home, d 662 

Benjamin F. Stackhouse, d. 587 

Myron Richardson, d 575 

John E. Webster, r 570 

Clarence N. Garvin, r 565 

Harry W. Wilson, r 518 



Benjamin T. Bartlett, r. & p. 512 

Albert E. Shute, p 93 

Dover — 
Ward 1— 

Charles E. Wendell, r. . 319 

Martin P. Bennett, r 314 

Charles G. Waldron, d. . 263 

John D. McCooey, d 187 

Ward 2— 

Eugene B. Foss, r 346 

Eugene Smart, r 340 

John McFadyen, r 331 

Daniel J. Cronin, Jr., d. 225 

John F. Watters, d. . . . 224 

Bernard Martin, d 223 

Ward 3 — 

Edwin M. Carr, r 353 

Edward Reilly, r 350 

Harry P. Preston, d. . . . 125 

Timothy Flynn, d 118 

Ward 4 — 

Fred L. Morang, r. & d. 653 

David C Mcintosh, r 416 

James Marshall, r. & p. . 407 

Charles T. Ryan, d 257 

Lewis M. Currier, d. . . . 254 
Ward 5 — 

John H. Wesley, d. & r. 201 
Dublin — 

Milton D. Mason, r., d. & p. 85 

Scattering 1 

Dunbarton — 

Abraham L. Burnham, r. . 80 

David A. Butterfield, d 39 

Durham — 

Fred E. Davis, d 114 

Fred B. Philbrick, r 87 

East Kingston — 

Frank B. Tilton, d 73 

George B. Hyde, r 44 

Eaton — 

Fred E. White, r 62 

Clement Drew, d 33 

Effingham — 

Edwin F. Leavitt, r 106 

Charles H. Clark, d 44 

Enfield — 

Stephen Laffee, r 203 

Howard S. Hill, d 103 



406 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Epping — 




George A. Gilmore, d 


208 


Almon L. True, r 


111 


Epsom — 




Benjamin M. Towle, r. . . . 


96 


Warren Tripp, d 


90 


Exeter — 




Samuel K. Bell, r 


611 


Richard E. Shute, r 


602 


Edward E. Nowell, r 


597 


Luke Leighton, r 


580 


Patrick J. Kennedy, d . . . 


278 


Samuel W. Langley, d . . . . 


278 


William A. Stone, d 


274 


Vertum Duf ault, d 


272 


Farmington — 




Edwin H. Thomas, r 


417 


James W. Ham, r 


414 


Ira W. Glidden, d 


292 


Oscar F. Kimball, d 


254 


Fitzwilliam — 




Clarence M. Damon, r. . . . 


110 


Francestown — 




Edwin D. Stevens, r 


89 


John B. Case, d 


52 


Franconia — 




Fred G. Sanborn, d 


74 


William D. Rudd, r 


57 


Scattering 


1 


Franklin — 




Ward 1— 




Peter Dana, d 


170 


Harry W. Burleigh, r. . 


123 


Ward 2 — 




Pat'k J. Cunningham, d. 


255 


Maxime A. Proulx, d . . . . 


254 


Ralph B. Griffin, r 


172 


Ward 3 — 




Walter F. Duffy, r. & p. 


292 


Gilbert G. Fellows, d . . . . 


251 


John W. Dresser, r 


229 


Freedom — 




Arthur P. Merrow, d 


110 


Edwin L. Huckins, r 


48 


Fremont — 




Joseph P. Bassett, r 


75 


Frank D. Rowe, d 


30 


Gilford— 




Orman M. Sanborn, r. & p. 


124 


Fred J. Potter, d 


78 



Gilmanton — 

Royal L. Page, r 

Charles A. Price, d 

Gilsum — 

Elmer D. Banks, d , 

John H. Laing, r. & p. . . , 
Goffstown — 

Lucian W. Bartlett, r. . . . , 

Robert M. Gordon, r 

Eben B. Bartlett, d. & p. . 

Wm. H. Woodbury, d. & p 
Gorham — 

Bartholomew F.McHugh, d 

Joseph O. George, d 

Henry M. Berwick, r . . . . 

Joseph St. Clair, r 

Goshen — 

John S. Smart, r 

Hial F. Nelson, d 

Grafton — 

Alden H. Barney, r 

George H. Johnson, d. . . . 
Greenfield — 

Edwin C. Hopkins, d 

Frank S. Gage, r 

Greenland — 

Edward W. Holmes, r 

Frank Dearborn, d 

Greenville — 

Louis O. Boisvert, d 

George E. Robbins, r 

Groton — 

George C. Goodboo, r 

Charlie D. Jewell, d 

Hampstead — 

Albion D. Emerson, r. . . . 

Forrest O. Bailey, d 

Hampton — 

Edwin L. Batchelder, i. d. 

Warren H. Hobbs, r. and d. 
Hampton Falls — 

William E. Walton, r 

Scattering 

Hancock — 

Clark S. Ellinwood, d 

Will O. Stearns, r 

Hanover — 

Horace F. Hoyt, r 

Charles F. Emerson, r. & p. 

Thomas E. Ward, d 



137 
106 

51 

44 

304 
303 
264 
246 

217 
216 
167 
141 

43 
33 



77 
37 



107 
38 



155 
81 



39 
14 



219 
167 



64 

212 
201 
194 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



407 



Jerome Chesley, p 

James Campion, d 

Harrisville — 

Frank P. Symonds, r 

Selden P. Tuttle, d 

Haverhill — 

Frank N. Keyser, r. & p. . 

Luther C. Butler, r. & p. . 

Henry S. Bailey, r 

Olin A. Lang, d. & p 

John E. Eastman, d 

Samuel T. Page, d 

Henniker — 

Harrie W. Balch, d 

George W. Sargent, r 

Hill — 

Alfred M. Kelley, r 

Harold A. Woodward, d. . 
Hillsborough — 

John S. Childs, r 

Frank D. Gay, r 

Arthur C. Appleton, d . . . . 

John L. Shedd, d 

Hinsdale — 

Orren C. Robertson, r. & d. 

Scattering 

Holderness — 

Harold A. Webster, r. . . . 

Moses T. Evans, d 

Hollis— 

Edwin H. Stratton, r 

Scattering 

Hooksett — 

Guy M. Lawrence, r 

Arthur A. Strickford, d. . . 
Hopkinton — 

Robert T. Gould, d. & p. . 

Albert F. Runnells, r 

Hudson — 

Henry C. Brown, r. & d. . 

George E. Durivage, p. . . . 
Jackson — 

Harry A. Thompson, r. . . 

Dean W. Davis, d 

Jaffrey — 

John G. Townsend, r 

Edward C. Boynton, d. . . . 

James H. Fitzgerald, d . . . . 

Lewis W. Davis, r 



150 


Jefferson — 




106 


Richard B. Eastman, r. . . 


178 




George C. Evans, d 


87 


74 


Keene — 




70 


Ward 1— 






Walter G. Perry, r. & i 


). 331 


553 


Wm. J. Callahan, r. & i 


). 320 


499 


Ward 2— 




493 


Jerry P. Wellman, r. . . 


258 


321 


Charles Warren, d 


213 


293 


Frank C. Hopkins, r. . . 


169 


275 


Ward 3— 






Frank Huntress, r. & ] 


). 255 


220 


Herman C. Rice, r. & i 


). 233 


139 


George E. Forbes, d. . . 


. 171 




Oscar P. Applin, d. . . . 


117 


98 


Ward 4 — 




37 


William S. Tuttle, r. . . 
Ward 5— 


. 197 


381 


Daniel M. Spaulding, r. 


172 


305 


Robert J. Patten, d. . . . 


156 


244 


Kensington — 




179 


Herman E. Brown, d... 


54 




Herbert M. Prescott, r . . . 


53 


361 


Kingston — 




1 


Frank W. Parker, r 


136 




Walter S. Bartlett, d 


118 


117 


Laconia — 




68 


Ward 1 — 






John T. Dodge, d 


125 


135 


John Spalding, r 


. 110 


2 


Ward 2 — 






, William B. Johnson, r. 


193 


204 


Arthur W. Spring, r. . 


189 


127 


Cleophas L. Fecteau, d. 


181 




Charles R. Pease, d. . . 


175 


251 


Ward 3 — 




185 


Thomas H. Lowe, r. . . 


97 




William T. Swain, d. . . 


52 


216 


Ward 4 — 




110 


William F. Seaverns, r. 


198 




Edwin H. Shannon, r. 


. 191 


71 


Orrin N. Sanborn, d. . . 


145 


53 


Charles B. Hibbard, d. 


130 




Sherman W. Brown, s. 


13 


190 


Henry J. Cummings, s. 


11 


187 


Ward 5— 




182 


Archie B. Sanborn, r. . 


216 


179 


Frank E. Pearson, r. . 


198 



408 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Prank H. Stone, d. . . 

Thomas F. Ford, d 

Edward Dow, s 

Joseph E. Rexford, s. . . . 

Ward 6 — 

George B. Munsey, r. . . . 
Simon A. Whitten, r. . . 

William O. White, d 

Olin C. Moore, d 

George W. Lilley, s . . . . 
Lancaster — 

Daniel J. Truland, r 

Fred C. Congdon, r 

Abner Bailey, r 

John M. Carr, d 

Arthur T. White, d 

Clarence M. Nourse, d . . . . 
Langdon — 

Bayard T. Mousley, d 

William Hall, r 

Lebanon — 

Karl E. Allen, d 

Frank Collins, d 

Eben S. Haskell, r 

Horace French, r 

Ralph F. Hough, r. & p. . 

Eugene B. Gerrish, r 

Fred A. Jones, r. & p 

Harry K. Davis, d 

Harold L. Morgan, d. . . . 

Napoleon A. Jette, d 

Lee — 

Frank J. Davis, r 

Granville B. Thompson, d. . 
Lempster — 

Lucius H. Nichols, d 

Charles A. Cragin, r 

Lincoln — 

John Taylor Alton, r 

Dennis O. Wallace, d 

Lisbon — 

Herbert B. Moulton, d. . . . 

Fred J. Moore, r. & p. . . . 

Ward P. Aldrich, r. & p . . . 

Irving E. James, d 

Littleton — 

William I. Richardson, d. 

Harvey C. Kinne, d 

Edward J. Cummings, d. . 

Frank T. Davis, r 



163 


Fred H. Merrill, r 


469 


161 


Edward H. Wells, r 


455 


19 


Londonderry — 




18 


Eugene O. Greeley, r 


200 




Sidney A. Webster, d 


119 


340 


Loudon — 




330 


Everett P. Jenkins, r 


128 


179 


Elbridge S. Wales, d 


67 


174 


Lyman — 




7 


William Birch, Jr., d . . . . . 


55 




Charles E. Woolson, r. . . . 


37 


464 


Lyme — 




438 


George W. Barnes, r 


149 


427 


Ambrose A. Turner, d . . . . 


55 


292 


Lyndeborough — 




292 


Charles H. Tarbell, r 


108 


291 


Charles L. Perham, d 

Madbury — 


45 


45 


Albert D. Emerson, d 


50 


34 


Edward L. Young, r 

Madison — 


34 


642 


Samuel J. Gilman, r 


76 


622 


James O. Gerry, d 


67 


614 


Manchester — 




598 


Ward 1— 




590 


Robert E. Wheeler, r. . . 


463 


521 


Bayard C. Ryder, r. & p. 


463 


512 


Harry E. Cole, r 


459 


507 


Charles C. Austin, d. . . . 


147 


498 


John F. Lee, d 


138 


463 


James M. Kirby, d . . . . 
Ward 2 — 


137 


72 


Ralph E. Hall, r 


566 


59 


Henry W. Boutwell, r. . 


563 




George Allen Putnam, r. 


560 


49 


Henry F. Berry, r. . . . . . 


557 


40 


Lee C. Abbott, d 


296 




Walter P. Mullen, d 


276 


58 


Thomas R .Burns, d. . . . 


270 


28 


Arthur A. Lamoreux, d. 
Ward 3— 


269 


312 


T. W. Robinson, r. & p. 


583 


303 


John G. Crawford, r. & p. 


567 


291 


Eugene G. Libbey, r. . . . 


561 


283 


Carl A. Peterson, r. . . . . 


558 




George E Prime, r 


558 


586 


William E. Smith, r 


555 


581 


William J. Starr, d . . . . 


344 


560 


Timothy F. O'Connor, d. 


332 


496 


William E. Potter, d. . . . 


322 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



409 



John T. Hannigan, d 
Jesse F. Flansberg, d 

Ward 4 — 

Clarence M. Woodbury, r 
Charles E. Crosby, r. . . 
Henry B. Fairbanks, r. 
Frank A. Dockham, r. & p 
Frank A. Challis, r. & p 
Charles J. Darrah, d. . 
Samuel F. Burleigh, d 
John F. Conway, d . . 
Patrick H. Moran, d. 
William C. Tuttle, d. 

Ward 5 — 

James H. Collins, d. 
Maurice J. Connor, d 
Peter E. Harlan, d. . 
James L. Glynn, d . . 
Patrick McG-reevy, d. 
Richard H. Horan, 
John F. Kelley, d. . . 
Daniel J. McCarthy, 
John Shaughnessy, d 
Alfred N. St. Jean, r 
Severe Lemire, r. . . . 
Alphonse Regnier, r. 
John E. Rivard, r. . . 
Frederick G. Barney, r 
James Kendrigan, r. 

Patrick Kelly, r 

John C. Sandstrom, r, 
Frank J. Earnshaw, 

Ward 6 — 

Robert Bunton, r. & p 
Chas. G. Dunnington, r 
James M. Nelson, r. & j 
John H. Bartlett, r. . . 
Arthur E. Wiggin, r. . 
Homer M. Whittier, d 
Carlton G. Stevens, d. 
Richard N. Allen, d. . 
Octave Dulude, d. . . . 
James J. Sullivan, d . . 
Hosea W. Spencer, s. 
James F. Nichols, s . . 

Ward 7 — 

John M. Ready, d . . . . 
Michael T. Sullivan, d 
Martin L. Mahoney, d 
Joseph Gosselin, r. . . . 



321 


Norbert Martel, r 


233 


312 


Abraham Green, r 

Ward 8 — 


171 


461 


John H. Rice, d 


484 


442 


Albert J. Parent, d . . . . 


461 


436 


Michael S. Donnelly, d. 


429 


434 


Thomas R. Stewart, d. 


414 


430 


George W. French, r. . . 


401 


306 


Charles D. Trudel, r. . . 


394 


296 


Clarence H. Knowles, r 


389 


291 


Ernest G. Swanberg, r. 


349 


274 


Ward 9 — 




265 


William B. McKay, r. . 


389 




Wm. A. Burlingame, r. 


380 


638 


Samuel F. Davis, r. . . 


371 


638 


James A Sayers, r. . . . 


364 


632 


Charles W. Bailey, r. . . 


359 


629 


Charles F. Read, d. . . . 


320 


623 


Valentine McBride, d. . 


252 


617 


Ward 10 — 




615 


Theodore Graf, r 


306 


613 


Charles A. Newell, r . . . 


291 


610 


Harry C. Jones, r 


289 


182 


Henry J. Van Vliet, d. 


281 


178 


Herman Rodelsperger, d 


261 


178 


George W. Cheney, d. . 


223 


176 


Joseph Cerweny, s . . . . 


60 


159 


Ward 11— 




158 


John L. Barry, d. . . . 


421 


157 


George E. Roukey, d. . . 


411 


153 


Dennis F. Scannell, r. . 


404 


152 


Andreas Schricker, d. . 


347 




John E. Piller, r 


343 


525 


Herman S. Greager, r. 


273 


523 


Fritz Kuehn, s 


80 


518 


John Van Vaerenewyck, 


3. 78 


507 


John W. Wolf, s 


75 


505 


Ward 12 — 




469 


Frank G. Lizotte, r. . . . 


306 


465 


George Provost, r 


283 


463 


Rene Janelle, d 


278 


435 


Alphonse Grenier, r. . . 


276 


422 


Prosper E. Chatel, d. . . 


272 


28 


Napoleon Beaulac, r. . . 


268 


27 


Elzear E. Grandmaison, d 


. 252 




Edmond Godbout, d . . . 


248 


555 


Morris Slonimsky, s . . . 


31 


536 


Ward 13 — 




527 


Ubald Hebert, r. ; 


317 


233 


Treffle Raiche, r 


316 



410 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL 



Ferdinand Farley, r. . . . 


315 


Charles Miville, r 


303 


Omer Janelle, d 


297 


Arthur Belanger, r 


277 


Romeo J. Olivier, d . . . . 


258 


Jeremiah J. McCarthy, d. 


243 


Hilaire Trudel, d 


238 


Amedee Nerbonne, d . . . . 


227 


Marlborough — 




John Kimball, r 


147 


Lewis G. Hildreth, d 


118 


Marlow — 




Warren M. Davis, r 


45 


Amos E. Rogers, d 


27 


Mason — 




Hervey E. Whittaker, d. & r. 


53 


Scattering 


3 


Meredith — 




Dudley Leavitt, r 


257 


Charles N. Roberts, d . . . . 


213 


Merrimack — 




John E. Haseltine, r 


140 


Harry M. Green, d 


70 


Milan — 




Ruel A. Woods, r 


86 


Scattering 


1 


Milford — 




Fred J. Kendall, r. & p. . . 


474 


Pulaski R. Woodman, r. 




& p 


434 


Joseph A. Mallalieu, r. . . . 


425 


Frank 0. Loring, d 


247 


Thomas H. Mullen, d. & p. 


244 


Edward P. Cassidy, d 


231 


Milton — 




Moses G. Chamberlain, r. . 


283 


Robert A. Mcintosh, d . . . 


82 


Mont Vernon — 




Jay M. Gleason, r 


48 


Frank J. Connor, d 


25 


Scattering 


2 


JJLLXJ UltUIl U\J1 U Ut,Il 

James E. French, r. &d.. 


238 


Nashua — 




Ward 1 — 




Henry C. Shattuck, r. . 


425 


Herbert E. Kendall, r. & p. 


414 


Edward H. Sheridan, d. 


190 


James F. Whitney, d . . . . 


187 



Ward 2— 

Amos J. Wheeler, r. 
Robert A. French, r 
Arthur R. Dubuc, d 

Ward 3 — 

Noe Richard, d . . . . 
John B. Riendeau, d 
Joseph Pepin, d . . . 
James H. Roche, r. 
Leo F, Jelly, r. . . . 
Joseph N. Roy, r. . 

Ward 4 — 

William E. Foisie, r 
John W. Fogarty, d. 

Ward 5 — 

Thomas McLaughlin, d 
Michael P. Sullivan, d 
Arthur B. Garvais, r. 

Ward 6 — 

Matthew T. Sullivan, d 
William S. Henry, r. . . 

Ward 7— 

Thomas F. Mulvanity, d 
Frank O. Morse, d. . . . 
Charles H. Powell, d. . . 
Charles P. Hall, r. & p 
Andros B. Jones, r. . . 
Geo. W. Buzzell, r. & p 

Ward 8— 

Irenee D. Ravenelle, d 
Henry M. Burns, d . . . 
Barth'w J. Hargraves, 
Joseph M. Dupont, r. 
Ralph W. Holt, r. . . 
John W. Flaherty, r. 

Ward 9 — 

Joseph Larouche, d. . 
Edward DeLacombe, d 
Auguste Gaudreau, d 
George L. Soucy, d 
Charles Gravelle, r. 
Henry E. Labine, r. 
New Boston — 

Charles F. Marden, r. 

George F. Kilborn, d. . 
Newbury — 

Elwin C. Lear, r 

Clarence L. Perkins, d 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



411 



Newcastle — 




James W. Pridham, d 


83 


Charles H. Giles, r 


36 


New Hampton — 




Guy B. Torsey, d 


95 


Harry S. Flanders, r 


90 


New Ipswich — 




Philip F. Gordon, r. & d. . . 


102 


New London — 




Elmer E. Adams, r 


130 


William M. Pilsbury, d . . . . 


83 


Newmarket — 




Arthur L. Turcotte, d . . . . 


300 


Albert F. Priest, d 


295 


George M. Mathes, d 


292 


William M. Roberts, r. & p. 


181 


John F. Brown, r. & p. . . 


175 


Thomas H. Conley, r. & p. 


172 


Newport — 




Elmer E. Dodge, r 


578 


George A. Fairbanks, r. . . . 


571 


Leroy C. Angell, r 


567 


Hobert B. Bass, d 


296 


Charles L. Brown, d 


285 


George H. Gamash, d 


287 


Newton — 




Hayford Battles, r 


144 


Walter A. Drake, d 


42 


Northfield — 




Jeremiah E. Smith, r 


209 


Daniel M. Page, d 


126 


North Hampton — 




Alfred L. Marston, d 


106 


George A. Batchelder, r. . 


105 


Northumberland — 




James B. McFarland, r. . . 


265 


Joseph P. Boucher, r. . . . 


216 


Frank W. Tibbetts, n. p. . . 


180 


Andrew J. Marshall, n. p. . 


167 


Northwood — 




John G. Towle, r 


157 


Scattering 


4 


Nottingham- — 




Arthur W. McDaniel, r. . . . 


122 


Harold A. Colcord, d 


52 


Orange — 




Melvin B. Eastman, d 


29 


Harry A. Ford, r 


17 



Orford — 

Harry E. Morrison, r 

Charles E. Brock, d 

Ossipee — 

Ervin W. Hodsdon, r 

Herbert W. Hobbs, d 

Pelham — 

Frank M. Woodbury, r. & d. 

Scattering 

Pembroke — 

George F. Georgi, d 

Amedee Fremeau, d 

Lawrence C. Bates, d 

Lewis W. Cass, r 

Edwin L. Child, r 

John D. Hamilton, r 

Peterborough — 

James F. Brennan, d. . . . 

Andrew J. Walbridge, r. . . 

Mortier L. Morrison, r. . . . 

James A. Longley, d 

Piermont — 

Orlo B. Stanley, d 

William B. Deal, r 

Pittsburg — 

Charles Merrill, r 

Fred F. Hawes, d 

Pittsfield — 

Frank M. Cutler, d 

Richard B. Bartlett, r. & p. 

Harlan W. Jacobs, d 

Chas. N. Batchelder, r. & p. 

Scattering 

Plainfield — 

Fred A. Rogers, r 

Frank Whitaker, d 

Plaistow — 

Fred P. Hill, r. & p 

Woodbury L. Marston, d. . 
Plymouth — 

Edward C. Brogan, d 

Ernest I. Bell, r. & p 

Josiah R. Elliott, d 

Richard J. McLean, r. & p. 
Portsmouth — 

Ward 1 — 

Lewis Soule, d 

George H. Sanderson, r. 
Thomas Entwistle, r. . . 



96 

62 

243 
169 

172 
1 

263 
255 
252 
231 
217 
214 

257 
249 
231 
217 

71 
62 

90 
51 

318 
294 
263 
236 
12 

119 

107 

148 

60 

321 
304 
294 
259 



303 
292 
278 



412 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Ward 2— 




Ward 6— 




John. H. Bartlett, r 


517 


John M. Hubbard, r. . . . 


257 


John Pender, r 


513 


Roy C. Home, r 


245 


George A. Wood, r 


423 


Scattering 


1 


Chas. Cogswell Smith, d. 


421 


Rollinsford — 




Cornelius F. Dowd, d . . . 


349 


James F. Philpott, d 


154 


James Spencer Lilley, p. 


26 


Cornelius E. Murphy, d. . . 


142 


Ward 3 — 




Curtis W. Blaisdell, r 


112 


Daniel W. Badger, d . . . 


288 


Charles N. Lord, r 


112 


William Casey, d 


240 


Rumney — 




Thomas A. Ward, r 


137 


Daniel Kidder, d 


106 


Charles W. Greene, s . . . 


8 


Albert M. Spaulding, r. . . . 


105 


Ward 4 — 




Rye- 




Edward S. Downs, r. . . 


164 


Joseph W. Berry, r 


147 


Benj. F. Mugridge, Jr., d. 


163 


Wallace S. Goss, d 


137 


Simon P. Harmon, s . . . 


29 


Salem — 




Ward 5— 




Walter F. Haigh, r. & p. . 


273 


Ralph C. Dickey, r. . . . 


132 


Fred C. Buxton, r 


234 


John T. Sheehan, d 


107 


Walter L. Duston, d 


94 


Philip Halpin, s 


6 


Charles S. Woodbury, p. . . 


19 


Randolph — 




Scattering 


1 


Vyron D. Lowe, r 


18 


Salisbury — 




Laban M. Watson, d 


7 


Ned D. Sanborn, r. & d. . . 


102 


Raymond — 




Scattering 


2 


George E. Dodge, d 


193 


Sanbornton — 




John E. Cram, r 


131 


Robert M. Wright, r 

Henry F. Barker, d 


152 


Richmond — 


64 


Albert B. Conway, r 


53 


Sandown — 




Edward J. Costello, d 


30 


George W. Dimmock, d . . . . 


49 


Rindge — 




Martin L. Clark, r 


36 


Harris H. Rice, r., d. & p. 


133 


Sandwich — 




Scattering 


3 


Harry Blanchard, d 


149 


Rochester — 




Julian A. Smith, r 


118 


Ward 1 — 




Seabrook — 




Wilbur F. Cole, r 


162 


Lucien W. Foote, d 


212 


Sumner C. Sleeper, d. . 


159 


Phineas F. Beckman, r. . . . 


155 


Ward 2 — 




Shelburne — 




Edward L. Tebbetts, d. . 


169 


Charles E. Philbrook, r. . . . 


25 


Everett A. Pugsley, r. . 


152 


Ralph I. Peabody, d 


19 


Ward 3 — 




Somersworth — 




Harry L. Meader, r 


167 


Ward 1 — 




Ward 4 — 




Archie L. Jacques, d. . . . 


98 


Edward P. Maxfield, r. . 


197 


Alpheus L. Faunce, r. . . 


96 


Alcide Bilodeau, r 


187 


Ward 2 — 




Philias Larochelle, d . . . . 


186 


John F. Lucey, d 


130 


Aurelle Beaudoin, d. . . . 


180 


Fred Wiesner, r 


109 


Ward 5 — 




Ward 3— 




Luther B. Sampson, r. . 


153 


Laurent J. Gaudreau, d. 


124 


Albert Edgar Evans, d. . 


141 


Sumner C. Home, r. . . . 


66 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



413 



Ward 4— 




Unity — 




William Perron, d 


230 


Frank Reed, r , 


71 


John J. McCarthy, d . . . . 


215 


John H. Anderson, d 


52 


Francis X. Nollette, r . . . 


60 


Wakefield — 




Ward 5 — 




William N. Rogers, d 


218 


Peter M. Gagne, r. & d. 


130 


Edwin A. Himes, r 


164 


Springfield — 




Walpole — 




Carl B. Philbrick, r. &d.. 


71 


George F. Landers, d . . . . 


268 


Guy A. Loverin, n. p.... 


33 


William H. Lane, r 


267 


Stark — 




Frank B. Sibley, d 


249 


Ira N. Cole, d 


66 


Cyrus M. Clough, r 


235 


Harry W. Stone, r 


46 


Warner — 




Stewartstown — 




Andrew J. Hook, r 


197 


Levi Brooks, r 


155 
76 


Lewis C. Shaw, d 

Warren — 


140 


James Stapleton, d 




Strafford — 




Charles F. Little, r 


98 


John W. Cater, r 


137 


Harry J. Henderson, d. . . 


69 


Albert L. Watson, d 


86 


Washington — 




Stratford — 




Arthur Harry Davison, d. . 


. 28 


William H. Kimball, d. . . 


123 


Wallace W. Dole, n. p . . . . 


28 


Hugh H. Johnson, r. . . . 


90 


CaroU E. Farnsworth, r. . 


24 


Stratham — 




(no choice) 




Joseph G. Barnard, d. . . . 


85 


Weare — 




Benjamin Brierley, r 


60 


George H. Eastman, d. . . . 


190 


Sunapee — 




Byron L. Morse, r 


167 


George E. Gardner, d.... 


134 


Webster — 




Nathan P. Baker, r 


129 


James L. Colby, r 


65 


Sutton — 




John S. Putney, d 


52 


Arthur E. Davis, d 


104 


Wentworth — 




Henry D. Little, r 


93 


Frank C. Bradeen, r. & p. . 


87 


Swanzey — 




Elias McGinnis, n. p 


24 


Frank S. Faulkner, d 


201 


Scattering 


3 


Albert B. Read, r 


148 


Westmoreland — 




Tamworth — 




( Asa A. Whitman, r 


89 


Charles C. Smith, d 


141 


Whitefield — 




Martin L. Schenck, r 


111 


Elbridge W. Snow, r. & p. 


267 


Thornton — 




Alphonso W. Bowles, d. . . 


190 


Frank L. Hazeltine, r 


79 


Wilmot — 




John F. Merrill, d 


65 


William A. Thompson, r. . 


79 


Tilton — 




Charles J. Graney, d 


73 


Charles E. Tilton, d 


292 


Wilton — 




Herman Page, d 


260 


Stanley H. Abbot, r. & p. . 


205 


Homer B. Lanpher, r. . . . 


231 


Daniel M. Brennan, d. . . . 


158 


Arthur T. Staples, r 


217 


Winchester — 




Troy — 




Franklin J. Willard, r . . . . 


292 


George W. Mason, d 


116 


Edward F. Qualters, d . . . . 


271 


Harry S. Platts, r 


96 


Walter D. Sawyer, r 


256 


Tuftonboro — 




Aaron B. Woodbury, d. . . . 


192 


Willie W. Thomas, d . . . . . 


94 


Windham — 




Albert W. Swett, r 


86 


Rufus H. Bailey, r 


78 



414 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Eugene W. Armstrong, d. . 25 Joseph Clifton Avery, d. . . 256 

Wolfeboro — Charles R. Grant, d 250 

Henry F. Libby, r 386 Woodstock — 

John F. Goodwin, r 383 Albert W. Sawyer, r 72 

John S. Gray, d 71 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



415 



ROCKINGHAM 
COUNTY. 



Atkinson 

Auburn , 

Brentwood 

Candia 

Chester 

Danville , 

Deerfield , 

Derry 

East Kingston... 

Epping 

Exeter 

Fremont 

3-reenland 

Hampstead 

Sampton 

Eampton Falls.. 

Kensington 

Kingston 

Londonderry 

Newcastle 

Newfields 

tfewington 

Newmarket 

Newton 

North Hampton. 

STorthwood 

Nottingham . 

Plaistow 

Portsmouth — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Raymond 

lye 

Salem 

■Sandown 

Seabrook 

South Hampton. 

Stratham 

iVindham 



Sheriff. 


Coi] 
Soli 


Pi 






T3 




P. 


03 








TS 


e3 


h 








C 


Fh 


>> 


c3 

a 


ft 


a 
.5 




CO 


W 


W. 



53 

82 

95 

116 

117 

108 

140 

594 

55 

120 

608 

74 

102 

104 

251 

91 

54 

125 

200 

37 

73 

25 

183 

131 

107 

138 

115 



64 
38 
94 
42 
21 
85 

590 
62 

198 

263 
25 
39 
57 

120 
16 
36 

108 
84 
77 
40 
29 

282 
47 
95 
76 
55 



Totals 



142 
321 


50 
269 


616 


303 


235 


181 


216 


140 


153 


97 


145 


169 


162 


116 


298 


83 


41 


41 


169 


128 


41 


22 


82 


63 


64 


26 


5,583 


4,362 



51 

85 ! 

89' 
113 
118 
109 
145 
584 

58 
121 
660 

73 

93 
102 
239 

90 

57 
132 
200 

30 

69 

20 
187 
129 

96 
138 
115 
133 

239 
422 
143 
156 
132 
147 
139 
290 

41 
140 

38 

83 

72 



6,078 



34 
65 
41 
95 
44 
20 
70 

600 
61 

195 

242 
25 
48 
62 

135 
15 
40 

108 



35 

284 
54 

103 
79 
55 
59 

352 

497 

266 

195 

117 

165 

140 

88 

42 

176 

25 

61 

26 



County 
Treasurer. 



52 

82 

85 

110 

115 

105 

140 

581 

49 

116 

635 

75 

101 

101 

227 

93 

65 

122 

196 

36 

70 

21 

181 

127 

97 

133 

113 

131 

274 

510 

148 

176 

133 

150 

146 

283 

42 

146 

41 

80 

70 



4,947 ! 6,158 



32 
64 
43 
93 

43 
25 
80 

583 
70 

198 

257 
24 
38 
65 

132 
16 
38 

113 
84 
78 
44 
31 

286 
49 
99 
75 
56 
54 

287 

354 

239 

161 

105 

161 

124 

85 

39 

142 

21 

63 

26 



Register 
of Deeds. 



53 
85 

94 

116 

121 

109 

141 

591 

57 

119 

694 

74 

100 

108 

243 

90 

63 

131 

202 

37 

77 

23 

183 

129 

100 

136 

112 

136 

287 
555 
155 
184 
137 
145 
147 
297 

44 
158 

42 



4,577 6,432 



31 

59 
36 
93 
41 
23 
78 

578 
62 

194 

206 
24 
39 
53 

115 
14 
33 

107 
78 
77 
37 
30 

291 
51 
97 
73 
54 
57 

274 

320 

242 

151 

99 

159 

125 

84 

39 

137 

21 

56 

26 



4,364 



( 
416 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 
of Probate. 


County- 
Commissioners. 


ROCKINGHAM 

COUNTY. 

— Concluded. 


ft 
PI 

03 

to 

o 
o 

m 


ft 

m 


ft | 

1 

05 ! 

u 

s 

pq | 


ft 

Pi 
OS 

u 

<D 

% • 

03 i 


ft 

U 

u 

05 

Pi 
P | 


>6 

>> 


o 

o 

U 

Ph 


•6 

ft 
© 

53 




52 

80 

91 

112 

118 

109 

137 

571 

55 

118 

635 

72 

99 

106 

242 

89 

53 

129 

199 

35 

68 

21 

180 

124 

96 

138 

113 

134 

285 

526 

154 

177 

137 

143 

146 

282 

41 

145 

42 

74 

71 


32 
64 
38 

94 
41 
22i 
76 

582 
61 

195 

257 
26 
39 
56 

119 
15 
37 

106 
82 
79 
47 
30 

287 
55 
97 
75 
53 
52 

282 

345 

238 

156 

101 

162 

126 

80 

41 

134 

20 

73 

26 


48 1 50 
83 i 77 


49 
88 
90 
113 
123 
106 
133 


33 
63 
39 
97 
39 
21 
80 

576 
65 

195 

253 
26 
39 
55 

118 
13 
41 

107 
81 
77 
46 
31 

289 
50 
97 
78 
53 
50 

281 
339 
226 

151 

100 

160 

118 

82 

38 

128 

24 

63 

28 


35 

64 
42 
99 
43 
19 
80 

574 
63 

199 

253 
28 
39 
54 

122 
14 
47 

112 
81 
78 
44 
30 

287 
55 
97 
75 
53 
55 

277 

324 

227 

155 

98 

162 

122 

83 

39 

137 

23 

65 

28 


37 




61 




92 
112 
119 

107 

144 

583 

54 

121 

622 

74 

99 

109 

241 

91 

53 

124 

198 

38 

70 

23 

179 

118 

102 

140 

115 

126 

311 

591 

190 

202 

148 

150 

160 

277 

42 

149 

39 

79 

71 


87 
106 
117 
105 
133 


40 




96 




43 




21 




79 




580 1 623 

52 | 54 

116 118 

639 616 

72 i 78 

98 98 

105 | 107 

240 J 237 

89 86 

49 52 

119 119 

193 200 

36 , 36 

71 ! 68 

22 23 

178 1 180 

125 i 120 

100 i 98 

137 138 

112 1 111 

119 107 

287 293 


574 


East Kingston 


64 
197 




257 




24 




41 




54 




121 




16 




43 




112 




79 




78 




45 




31 




285 




69 


North Hampton 


96 

76 




53 




98 


Portsmouth — 


272 


Ward 2 


537 

155 

187 

133 

143 

149 

272 

42 

130 

41 

77 

70 


534 

158 

184 

137 

145 

149 

280 

45 

133 

39 

76 

69 


323 




232 


Ward 4 


154 


Ward 5 


97 




160 




123 




89 




38 




140 


South Hampton 


24 
66 




27 






Totals 


6,199 


4,501 


6,394 


6,150 


6,213 


4,450 


4,482 


1535 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



417 









County- 


County 


Register 




Sheriff. 


Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 


of Deeds. 




a 




d 




ft 




A 




STRAFFORD 


r3 

CI 
o3 





03 




-a 

oi 




c 

eg 




COUNTY. 


U 


ntf 


M 


ni 


* 1 




U 


** 




bo 

CI 

o 


1 




o 


PI ! 


o 




o 
xn 

"5 


arrington 


139 


72 


134 


75 


134 


73 


129 


80 


over- 


















Ward 1 


41t> 
400 


147 
192 


390 
366 


167 
221 


391 
381 


158 
205 


393 
389 


159 


Ward 2 


195 


Ward 3 


380 


107 


348 


124 


375 


109 


371 


107 


Ward 4 


458 


223 


427 


245 


439 


232 


444 


230 


Ward 5 


30 


176 


44 


162 


18 


186 


20 


184 




120 

425 


64 
256 


117 
418 


69 
253 


112 

416 


70 
258 


114 
427 


66 


arming-ton 


259 




72 
51 


55 
34 


68 
42 


55 
34 


67 
46 


56 
34 


68 
46 


56 


adbury 


37 


iddleton 


43 


43 


42 


43 


43 


43 


43 


43 




261 
41 


116 

86 


254 
39 


114 

87 


246 
40 


118 

87 


244 
38 


120 


bw Durham 


86 


ochester— 


















Ward 1 


172 


132 


171 


130 


165 


138 


161 


146 


Ward 2 


148 


167 


159 


153 


138 


174 


118 


193 


Ward 3 


171 

150 


99 
215 


158 
152 


101 
211 


167 

1 147 


98 
216 


148 
138 


121 


Ward 4 


227 




182 
253 
126 


113 
147 
131 


182 
252 
115 


106 
130 
136 


i 175 

242 

i 111 


116 
149 
143 


167 
234 
117 


114 


Ward 6 


160 




137 


tmersworth — 




Ward 1 


95 


98 


94 


96 


90 


106 


92 


98 


Ward 2 


96 


138 


94 


138 


90 


141 


93 


137 


Ward 3 


72 


118 


73 


118 


69 


121 


72 


119 


Ward 4 


47 


216 


54 


213 


45 


221 


52 


212 


iVard 5 


25 


110 


24 


112 


24 


113 


24 


111 


rafford 


138 


85 


131 


86 


131 


84 


133 


85 


Totals 


4.509 


3,340 


4,348 


3,379 


4,302 


3,449 


4,275 


3,482 



418 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 














of 






County 








Probate. 




Commissioners. 










ft 


ft 




1 




STRAFFORD 


a 

03 


ft 









1 




COUNTY. 


^ 


TJ 




<S 








—Concluded. 




cs 


U 
















(3 




ftf 


*A 


<Xi 








o 


be 










eS 


u 

03 
PQ 




S3 
S3 

o 


i 


** 1 

I 






198 


121 


129 


1 

110 104 


77 


75 


Dover — 














Ward 1 


431 


384 1 


372 


350 178 1 


183 


204 


Ward 2 


477 


370 


350 


324 212 


220 


240 


Ward 3 


476 
669 


351 
434 


344 

407 


324 
396 


118 
255 


120 
256 


145 


Ward 4 


298 


Ward 5 


199 


20 


14 


14 


181 


189 


190 


Durham 


182 


96 


84 


95 


86 


118 


82 


Farmington 


682 


395 


412 


418 


285 


263 


264 


Lee 


127 


67 


68 


66 


61 


59 


59 


Madbury 


79 


41 


39 


39 


43 


46 


43 


Middleton 


86 r 


43 


43 


43 


43 


43 


43 




364 

124 


238 
44 


239 

40 


251 

40 


139 

87 


120 

87 


119 


New Durham 


87 


Rochester- 
















Ward 1 


302 


165 


166 


181 


142 


130 


124 


Ward 2 


306 


114 


128 


162 


197 


169 


155 


Ward 3 


263 


138 


163 


171 


137 


97 


96 


Ward 4 


362 


136 


145 


180 


214 


204 


189 


Ward 5 


286 


134 


151 


195 


152 


115 


103 


Ward 6 


384 
253 


209 
127 


230 
108 


278 
108 


198 
138 


141 
137 


127 


Rollinsf ord 


145 


Somersworth — 
















Ward 1 


191 
230 
191 


92 
91 

71 


91 

91 

70 


91 

92 
71 


99 
139 
119 


98 
139 
117 


99 


Ward 2 


139 


Ward 3 


119 


Ward 4 


264 
136 


47 
23 


47 
24 


47 
24 


215 
113 


215 
112 


214 


Ward 5 


112 




219 


137 


133 


137 


84 


84 


80 






Totals 


7,481 


4,088 


4,088 

1 


4,207 


3,739 


3,539 


3,551 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



419 









County- 


County 


Register 




Sheriff. 


Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 


of Deeds. 




ft 








ft 






ft 


BELKNAP 






ft 


m 


a 




1 


03 


COUNTY. 







a 


M 






•6 




O 






03 

a 


t3 

M 

O 


T3 




a 

O 




J3 


A 


a 


o 


o3 


a 


A 


0) 




s 


O 


W 


fc 


w 


VI 


fr 


W 


lton 


208 


165 


213 


158 


208 


163 


208 


167 


arnstead 


139 


142 


140 


137 


138 


138 


141 


135 


elmont 


148 


131 


147 


128 


140 


135 


135 


140 


enter Harbor 


50 


52 


52 


51 


51 


51 


53 


49 


ilford 


130 


65 


140 


56 


123 


62 


121 


71 


ilmanton 


130 


110 


133 


106 


128 


110 


127 


110 


aconia — 


















Ward 1 


132 


108 


128 


105 


126 


106 


121 


110 


Ward 2 


216 


174 


192 


181 


215 


149 


186 


176 


Ward 3 


94 


55 


99 


50 


102 


43 


94 


51 


Ward 4 


222 


123 


233 


107 


229 


105 


213 


124 


Ward 5 


I 237 
346 
253 
96 


152 
176 
217 

74 


222 

344 

266 

97 


156 

172 

200 

70 


233 

341 

256 

96 


138 
171 
207 
71 


224 
324 
261 
122 


159 


Ward 6 


194 




208 


ew Hampton 


57 




144 
241 


68 
254 


143 
229 


68 
269 


141 
224 


69 

275 


143 
238 


66 




257 


Totals 




2,786 


2,066 


2,778 


2,014 


2,751 


1,994 


2,711 


2.074 



420 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 














of 






County 








Probate. 




Commissioners 










ft 


d 


d 








BELKNAP 


05 


TJ 


c 

eg 








COUNTY. 






S3 




r£ 


TJ 


— Concluded. 


TJ 
















. 


-t-s 




u 


rt - 


fl 


a 






e 

a 

ee 


aa 


4* 

c3 

>> 


eB 

a 


u 
o 

S 

02 


o 
a 

§ 


Alton 


372 


212 


208 


210 1 165 


165 


171 


Barnstead 


274 


141 


142 


138 135 


135 


139 




274 
103 
183 


143 

52 

121 


140 

51 

122 


114 132 


130 
51 
67 


163 




49 
104 


49 
82 


52 


Gilford 


79 




232 


127 


133 


122 


107 


102 


132 


Laconia— 




Ward 1 


236 
366 
148 
339 
375 
517 
464 
166 
209 
491 


120 
196 

91 
215 
221 
337 
256 

94 
140 
239 


117 
192 

93 
208 
226 
329 
251 

91 
142 
236 


110 
153 

76 
179 
182 
307 
243 

92 
131 
239 


113 

162 

48 

113 

148 

176 

209 

71 

68 

252 


108 

140 

50 

121 

156 

178 

207 

73 

63 

254 


155 


Ward 2 


177 


Ward 3 


77 


Ward 4 


159 


Ward 5 


201 


Ward 6 


204 




223 




72 




72 


Tilton 


266 


Totals 


4,749 


2,705 


2,681 


2,449 


2,030 


2,000 


2,312 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



421 



CARROLL 
COUNTY. 



bany 

,rtlett 

ook field 

atham 

nway 

lingham 

eedom 

irt's Location 

ekson 

iHi«on 

mltonborough 

sipee 

ndwich 

mworth 

f tonboro 

akefield 

olfeboro 

Totals 



j County 
Sheriff. Solicitor. 



7 
53 
32 
20 
236 
88 
49 

"27 
77 
223 
228 
130 
120 
95 
174 
356 



31 

180 

30 

43 

583 

60 

109 

4 

98 

68 

24 

182 

121 

123 

89 

199 

278 



15! 

108 I 

14 

27 ! 
470 ; 

89 | 

60 ' 
2; 

67 

85 I 
222 
232 



21 

120 

53 

36 

330 

59 

97 

2 

54 

58 

24 

177 



County 
Treasurer. 



Register 
of Deeds. 



1,915 i 2,222 



147 


98 


150 


86 


96 


89 


102 


276 


313 


329 


2,199 


1.909 



14 

86 

31 

26 

431 

85 

55 

2 

54 

88 

220 

239 

133 

153 

97 

159 

362 

2,235 



22 


13 


133 


97 


32 


34 


36 


27 


343 


471 


56 


91 


101 


61 


2 


2 


59 


56 


57 


87 



24 



221 



165 


254 


103 


132 


84 


148 


87 


97 


213 


176 


268 


364 


1,785 


2,331 



22 

126 

31 

35 

321 

56 

93 

2 

57 

57 

23 

158 

104 



191 

265 



1,715 



422 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 

of 
Probate. 


County 
Commissioners. 


CARROLL 

COUNTY. 

—Concluded. 


9 


>6 

m 
.2 

3 

O 

w 


u 

u 
S3 

■s 

PQ 


u 

to 

d 

o 
fin 


IS 


f6 

M 

n 


o 



63 

s 




12 


22 


13 

86 
31 
26 
435 
90 
62 
2 

55 
87 
228 
244 
151 
145 
91 
170 
348 


12 

83 

31 

26 

431 

90 

71 

2 

53 

87 

221 

236 

126 

138 

93 

172 

350 


13 

85 

32 

29 

438 

90 

61 

2 

58 

87 

222 

233 

125 

139 

94 

171 

353 


22 

130 

35 

36 

338 

58 

97 

2 

58 

57 

21 

163 

98 

90 

93 

199 

300 


22 

131 

32 

36 

351 

57 

88 

2 

59 

56 

23 

178 

106 

91 

90 

196 

282 


22 




91 
36 
26 
448 
91 
62 
2 

59 
87 
221 
250 
134 
132 
95 
182 
374 


125 

29 

36 

334 

58 

94 

2 

56 

57 

29 

158 

102 

107 

87 

191 

261 


131 


Brookfield 


32 




33 




372 


Effingham 


55 




97 


Hart's Location 


2 
58 




56 


Moultonborough 


22 
159 




103 




90 




87 


Wakefield 


195 




265 






Totals 


2,303 


1,748 


2,264 ! 


2,222 


2,232 


1,797 


1,800 


1,779 







NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



423 









County 


County 


Register 




Sheriff. 


Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 


of U 


eeds. 


MERRIMACK 


a, 




P 




ft 




ft 




COUNTY. 




1 


o3 




p) 

o3 

-A 




c 


xi 






« 


u 


r6 


•V 


Fh 


•<- 




JS 


o 


u 

Q 
>> 


>> 


'> 

03 
P 


OJ 








B 




o3 
A 
Eh 




O 

pq 




o 




95 


110 


91 


114 


96 


109 


96 


111 




145 

157 

82 

102 


178 
91 
63 

106 


144 

148 
79 
88 


177 
91 
63 

116 


148 

154 

80 

95 


176 

90 

62 

110 


146 

159 

84 

99 


177 




88 




60 


radford 


107 


mterbury 


80 


66 


75 


66 


76 


67 


82 


59 


lichester 


93 


73 


91 


74 


92 


72 


91 


75 


>ncord — 


















Ward 1 


218 

97 


274 
79 


207 
82 


284 
91 


208 

74 


280 
92 


236 
85 


255 


Ward 2 


82 


Ward 3 


157 


97 


151 


100 


146 


105 


156 


95 


Ward 4 


572 


283 


488 


362 


478 


362 


541 


292 


Ward 5 


414 


143 


340 


219 


338 


220 


406 


150 


Ward 6 


407 


277 


364 


317 


369 


308 


403 


267 


Ward 7 


569 


251 


521 


291 


505 


304 


560 


250 


Ward 8 


139 


168 


92 


213 


82 


225 


98 


195 


Ward 9 


159 


162 


134 


193 


123 


200 


149 


170 


mbury 


85 


83 


83 


80 


87 


79 


85 


81 




85 


35 


82 


36 

84 


81 
95 


37 
84 


82 
96 


35 

87 




96 


85 


93 


anklin — 










Ward 1 


188 


100 


185 


102 


185 


105 


18S 


100 


PVard 2 


173 


232 


155 


244 


160 


239 


155 


242 


Ward 3 


274 


207 


268 


207 


289 


204 


272 


206 


mniker 


212 


133 


207 


» 139 


199 


131 


205 


132 


11 


97 


34 


95 


35 


97 


34 


96 


34 


>oksett 


164 


163 


157 


161 


162 


156 


160 


158 




222 


201 


225 


196 


220 


198 


229 


193 




115 
66 


74 
61 


105 
61 


83 
67 


101 

68 


82 
60 


97 

67 


90 


iwbury 


62 


w London 


119 


88 


118 


87 


121 


84 


121 


84 


•rthfield 


209 


122 


209 


124 


207 


124 


211 


120 




223 


252 


1 212 


263 


214 


257 


219 


253 


ttsfield 


265 


266 


271 


264 


273 


261 


250 


299 




64 


58 


59 


60 


60 


6S 


58 


59 


tton 


98 


90 


94 


92 


101 


88 


98 


90 




222 


109 


204 


122 


217 


106 


225 


102 




68 

72 


48 
73 


66 

72 


47 
73 


69 
75 

6,144 


47 
70 


70 
74 

6.446 


46 




73 






6,603 


4,935 


6.116 


5,337 


5,286 


4.979 







424 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 
















of 






County 








Probate. 




Commissioners 








ft 




d 


ft 


ft 

Pi 








MERRIMACK 


t» 




T3 


-ti 


cS 








COUNTY. 


£ 




<j3 


a 


Fh 








—Concluded. 






h 











H3 






rtf 




u 




-a 


>> 








t* 


o 




'£ 


<£ 


% 






CO 




*j 


& 


c? 


eg 


S3 


* 






O 








A 


o 






M 


O 


ffl 


Hs 


8 


O 


O 


Xfl 


Allenstown 


95 


110 


93 


93 


101 


112 


108 


104 


Andover 


147 


176 


145 


145 


145 


175 


176 


176 




158 

86 


86 
61 


159 

90 


154 

88 


154 

88 


85 
59 


88 
61 


95 


Bow 


60 


Bradford 


97 


108 


105 


108 


88 


100 


102 


105 




77 


65 


81 


79 


78 


66 


65 


70 




95 


72 


94 


95 


94 


76 


71 


72 


Concord — 




Ward 1 


221 


265 


222 


212 


217 


273 


269 


274 


Ward 2 


84 


82 


97 


85 


89 


86 


82 


82 


Ward 3 


156 


95 


154 


148 


148 


108 


101 


98 


Ward 4 


562 


279 


574 


512 


555 


301 


278 


277 


Ward 5 


414 


145 


403 


385 


397 


161 


156 


169 


Ward 6 


419 


262 


429 


392 


407 


275 


260 


277 


Ward 7 


564 
111 


244 
183 


559 
128 


519 
94 


538 
106 


272 
186 


251 
189 


256 


Ward 8 


182 


Ward 9 


155 

86 


149 

79 


156 

85 


144 

84 


164 
84 


164 
80 


163 
80 


158 


Danbury 


81 


Dunbarton 


84 


35 


84 


82 


82 


36 


36 


37 


Epsom 


95 


83 


98 


97 


98 


88 


87 


88 


Franklin- 


















Ward 1 


188 
164 


97 
233 


185 
162 


182 
150 


176 

144 


102 
229 


100 
229 


116 


Ward 2 


276 


Ward 3 


276 


201 


263 


262 


238 


213 


213 


261 




208 
95 

158 


136 

35 

159 

197 


216 

95 

159 

233 


204 

95 

160 

229 


203 

91 

158 

230 


152 

36 

157 

197 


131 

36 

154 

192 


123 


Hill 


39 




157 




197 




103 
66 


81 
61 


110 
71 


108 

72 


113 

70 


78 
58 


78 
56 


72 


Newbury 


57 


New London 


119 


85 


120 


121 


118 


85 


84 


86 


Northfield 


212 


120 


211 


208 


209 


118 


118 


122 


Pembroke 


215 


254 


217 


215 


222 


255 


253 


255 


Pittsfield 


275 
59 


253 

60 


265 

57 


265 
61 


278 
54 


264 
60 


264 

57 


260 


Salisbury 


66 


Sutton 


95 


91 


98 


102 


95 


90 


88 


91 


Warner 


m 


131 


220 


234 


218 


107 


101 


112 


Webster 


67 


49 


66 


65 


67 


52 


50 


52 


Wilmot 


72 


71 


72 


72 


73 


74 


70 


72 






Totals 


i.502 


4,893 


6,576 


6,321 


6,390 


5,029 


4,897 


5,075 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



425 











County- 


County 








Sheriff. 




Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 




I 
ft 

c 






ft 




ft 








03 






c 










HILLSBOROUGH 








c3 










COUNTY. 






ta 


Fh 


•d 


u 




B0 




e 

o3 


o 

ft 


s 


be 

.5 


9 

"5 


9 

IS 







bJD 




W. 


b 


Ph 


CO 


H 


£ 




p. 




112 
183 


59 
105 


2 
2 


112 
182 


61 
107 


109 
180 


61 
107 


2 




2 




134 
75 
52 
22 
86 

314 
44 
77 
67 


96 
66 
43 
62 
39 

249 
66 

160 
84 


2 
2 

"5 
3 

2 
1 

"i 


130 
75 
48 
19 
90 

311 
42 
78 
65 


93 
67 
46 
64 
41 

244 
68 

158 
88 


136 
75 

47 
21 
89 
312 
44 
77 
62 


89 
68 
45 
62 
40 

243 
65 

157 
87 


3 




2 








5 




3 




2 




1 






ancock 


1 


illsborough 


325 


208 


6 


321 


207 


321 


225 


5 


bllis 


125 


53 


1 


129 


51 


123 


49 


1 




204 

46 


92 

26 


n 

3 


208 
44 


99 

27 


197 

44 


95 

28 


8 


tchfield 


3 


rndeborough 


101 


43 




105 


42 


102 


41 




anchester — 


















Ward 1 


449 


169 


2 


464 


142 


471 


131 


2 


Ward 2 


553 


319 


9 


560 


291 


586 


268 


8 


Ward 3 


515 


422 


25 


544 


359 


566 


331 


26 


Ward 4 


415 


353 


18 


431 


310 


446 


294 


18 


iVard 5 


147 


703 


25 


156 


664 


167 


633 


25 


^Vard 6 


505 
146 


512 
633 


27 

7 


519 
131 


468 
643 


527 
164 


446 
585 


28 


Ward 7 


8 


Ward 8 


368 
334 
261 


513 
330 
309 


"5 

58 


384 

1 359 

300 


464 
263 
237 


402 
379 

307 


443 
246 
231 




JVard 9 


5 


Ward 10 


60 


iVard 11 


229 


533 




319 


410 


324 


387 






261 

267 


305 
318 


31 

2 


220 
223 


339 
355 


290 
300 


261 
258 


31 


ATard 13 


2 




31 
128 


27 
76 


'io 


31 

129 


27 
78 


29 
127 


25 

74 




>rrimack 


10 




459 


210 


7 


463 


216 


457 


201 


7 


mt Vernon. 


48 


29 




47 


27 


48 


28 




shua— 


















TVard 1 


440 


159 


5 


456 


171 


424 


167 


5 




259 
108 


166 
246 


5 

7 


257 
116 


187 
266 


250 
106 


165 
244 


5 


Vard 3 


5 




123 


114 




126 


126 


122 


114 




Vard 5 


56 


68 




56 


72 


56 


65 




Vard 6 


120 
319 


156 
386 


is 


114 
308 


186 
417 


120 

317 


148 
368 




Vard 7 


16 




383 

147 
135 


464 

287 
86 


3 

14 


362 

119 
132 


542 
362 
91 


370 

138 
137 


465 

285 
83 


3 




15 






w Ipswich 


79 


24 


6 


79 


23 


77 


24 


6 




100 
259 


61 
208 


2 
2 


99 
245 


66 
220 


96 
253 


64 
205 


3 


terborough 


2 




8 

36 

172 


3 

16 

174 


i 

5 


b 

35 
173 


6 

16 

173 


9 

36 
171 


3 

14 

177 






1 


■are 


2 



426 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



HILLSBOROUGH 

COUNTY. 

— Continued. 



Amherst 

Antrim 

Bedford 

Bennington . . 
Brookline 

Deering 

Francestown . 
Goff stown 

Greenfield 

Greenville 

Hancock 

Hillsborough . 

Hollis 

Hudson 

Litchfield 

Lyndeborough 
Manchester — 

Ward 1 .... 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 

Ward 11 .. 

Ward 12 .. 

Ward 13 .. 

Mason 

Merrimack . . 

Milford 

Mont Vernon 
Nashua — 

Ward 1 ... 

Ward 2 ... 

Ward 3 ... 

Ward 4 ... 

Ward 5 ... 

Ward 8 ... 

Ward 7 ... 

Ward 8 ... 

Ward 9 ... 
New Boston 
New Ipswich 

Pelham 

Peterborough 

Sharon 

Temple 

Weare 

Wilton 

Windsor 





Register 




Register 




of Deeds. 




of Probate. 


ft 






1 
ft 




•n 






T3 




03 








cS 


T3 




!i 










O 






$H 


O 


c3 


A 


ft 
ft 


O 



* 


P 


o 
P4 


o 
O 


O 


112 


59 


2 


113 


59 


183 


109 


2 


183 


107 


136 


87 


3 


136 


87 


74 


67 


2 


75 


67 


52 


45 




50 


44 


22 


64 


5 


22 


60 


92 


39 


3 


91 


40 


314 


244 


2 


319 


237 


50 


59 


1 


49 


60 


79 


156 




78 


156 


66 


84 


1 


65 


84 


320 


208 


4 


324 


204 


132 


47 


1 


128 


48 


216 


87 


6 


221 


85 


44 


28 


3 


44 


28 


106 


41 




107 


40 


455 


145 


2 


460 


137 


556 


289 


8 


559 


289 


531 


364 


26 


526 


350 


436 


300 


18 


427 


308 


151 


653 


25 


146 


654 


509 


475 


1 


529 


457 


157 


591 


8 


149 


605 


378 


453 




387 


406 


352 


266 


5 


346 


279 


288 


247 


62 


296 


239 


282 


425 




296 


428 


257 


289 


31 


253 


293 


252 


295 


2 


254 


302 


33 


24 




30 


26 


132 


72 


10 


129 


74 


465 


203 


6 


473 


197 


48 


28 




50 


26 


476 


149 


5 


453 


159 


295 


151 


6 


282 


148 


140 


225 


5 


134 


256 


146 


99 




139 


100 


66 


61 




61 


64 


153 


139 




150 


135 


344 


363 


14 


340 


364 


437 


427 


3 


438 


407 


174 


268 


14 


175 


256 


136 


84 




134 


84 


80 


24 


6 


77 


23 


97 


66 


2 


98 


59 


265 


206 


2 


267 


204 


9 


3 




9 


3 


38 


12 


1 


35 


13 


173 


175 


2 


175 


174 


162 


179 


1 


168 


175 


4 


3 




4 


3 



NEW HAMPSHIKE MANUAL. 



427 



HILLSBOROUGH 

COUNTY. 

— Concluded. 



3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
1 
1 
1 
1 

c 

91 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
S 
ft 



County Commissioners. 



109 

183 

135 

74 

50 

20 

87 

308 

46 

77 

65 

317 

122 

174 

43 

103 

480 
599 
588 
473 
180 
551 
190 
415 
378 
330 
352 
297 
312 
29 
120 
451 



408 
235 

94 
125 

54 
124 
281 
354 
123 
132 

75 

90 



170 

157 

3 



107 

181 

134 

74 

50 

19 

89 

319 

45 

77 

65 

313 

125 

219 

44 



459 
569 
564 
444 
154 
518 
157 
386 
358 
292 
319 
,266 
275 

31 
130 
453 

45 

478 
299 
140 
145 

75 
161 
376 
464 
193 
132 

71 

95 

250 

5 

37 

171 

152 

3 



105 

180 

130 

75 

50 

20 

111 

313 

51 

76 

65 

321 

119 

197 

45 

100 

459 

542 
545 
437 
134 
511 
128 
364 
342 
294 
301 
213 
216 

29 
130 
451 

47 

413 

228 

94 

124 

45 

118 

302 

354 

115 

134 

72 

92 

257 

8 

37 

174 

160 

4 



fl 

63 
106 

90 
. 67 

43 

63 

40 
241 

60 
160 

84 
211 

50 
141 

29 

45 

127 
264 
312 
273 
618 
431 
558 
435 
236 
223 
380 
241 
236 
27 
81 
204 
28 

190 

183 

256 

113 

72 

147 

399 

454 

284 

86 

24 

70 



16 
176 
185 



60 

111 
82 
68 
43 
62 
37 

238 
75 

157 
85 

205 
49 
90 
26 
49 

128 
261 
309 
255 
611 
423 
555 
417 
230 
222 
371 
243 
244 
26 
76 
199 
29 

152 

136 

210 

95 

57 

128 

330 

380 

239 

87 

24 

62 

211 

4 

15 

175 

192 

4 



59 

104 
81 
66 
43 
60 
33 

235 
53 

157 
80 

196 
48 
87 
26 
41 

127 
291 
338 
281 
651 
447 
626 
458 
253 
221 
409 
328 
349 
25 
75 
191 
27 

152 

161 

243 

102 

67 

145 

337 

453 

300 

83 

22 

60 

203 

3 

12 

173 

173 



428 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



CHESHIRE 
COUNTY. 



Alstead — 
Chesterfield 

Dublin 

Fitzwilliam 

Gilsum 

Harrisville 
Hinsdale . . 

Jaffrey 

Keene— 

Ward 1 .. 

Ward 2 . 

Ward 3 . 

Ward 4 . 

Ward 5 



Sheriff. 



93 
95 

67 

106 

57 

64 

231 

190 

334 
263 
262 
215 
173 



Marlborough 177 



Marlow 

Nelson 

Richmond . . . 

Rindge 

Roxbury 

Stoddard 

Sullivan 

Surry 

Swanzey 

Troy 

Walpole 

Westmoreland 
Winchester . . 



45 
32 
54 
111 
10 
30 
39 
33 
179 
110 
246 
82 
291 



Totals i 3,589 



106 

120 

69 

158 

82 

26 

11 

27 

28 

3 

10 i 

160 
93 

250 

41 

198 



County 
Solicitor. 



95 

94 

60 

105 

58 

63 

219 

184 

322 

260 

266 

211 

176 

179 

43 

30 

50 

107 

10 

26 

35 

34 

170 

103 

240 

77 

280 



S3 
40 
26 
30 
33 
68 
122 
165 

170 

101 

113 
72 

153 
79 
27 
12 
25 
27 
3 
17 
10 
11 

161 
92 

256 
43 

198 



10 



County 
Treasurer. 



83 
41 

24 
28 
32 
71 
122 
165 

174 

109 

127 

76 

157 

79 

27 

12 

27 

28 

3 

18 



167 
93 

240 
40 

190 



2,147 



3,497 2,137 103 



3,467. 2,151 



102 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



429 



CHESHIRE 

COUNTY. 

—Continued. 



Register 
of Deeds. 



Alstead 

Chesterfield . . 

Dublin 

Pitzwilliam . . 

GHlsum 

Harrisville . . , 

Hinsdale 

Jaffrey 

Keene — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Marlborough 

Marlow 

Nelson 

Richmond ... 

Rindge 

Roxbury 

Stoddard 

Sullivan 

Surry 

Swanzey 

Troy 

Walpole 

Westmoreland 
Winchester . . 

Totals . . . 



90 
92 
63 

107 
58 
61 

229 



314 
267 
266 
202 
169 
174 

43 

30 

48 
111 I 

10 

24 

36 

34 ! 
163 
105 
238 I 

84 I 
289 



97 
41 
24 
27 
34 
67 
118 
164 

169 

95 

115 

77 

157 

80 

29 

11 

25 

28 

3 

18 

Q 

11 

165 
93 

251 
38 

187 



3.495 



2,133 



Register 
of Probate. 



106 



87 

58 

103 

54 

57 

211 

183 

312 

262 

250 

203 

169 

164 

43 

31 

47 

106 

9 

24 

33 

30 

154 

105 

231 

79 

282 



3,383 



81 
42 
25 
29 
36 
69 
120 
165 

171 
99 

123 
71 

160 
84 
27 
12 
25 
29 
3 

18 
10 
10 

166 
91 

247 
39 

184 



2,136 



4 
3 

109 



4:30 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





County Commissioners. 


CHESHIRE 


ft 

a 

03 


ft 


ft 

PI 
o3 














COUNTY. 


U 


















—Concluded. 


fee 


o3 






TS 


nj 


CQ 








d 




is. 


►d 








pi 






-tf 










<D 


PI 


03 






3 


CO 


P 


PI 


o 


a 


« 


O 


h 




£ 


> 








p 




PI 






ft 


eS 


o 






o 


03 


o 






02 


P 


£ 


<\ 


s 


Eh 


ffl 


fi 


Ph 




92 
88 


92 
88 


92 
90 


83 
41 


83 
41 


81 
41 














60 
97 


58 
98 


55 
98 


26 

35 


29 
35 


25 
33 


2 
2 


1 

2 


1 


Fitzwilliam 


2 




55 

61 


56 
59 


56 
54 


36 

70 


38 

75 


37 
69 


"i 


"i 






1 




227 
182 


242 
183 


228 
180 


120 
166 


121 

171 


117 
165 


2 

1 


2 

1 


2 




1 


Keene — 




















Ward 1 


306 
255 
255 
203 
170 
164 


305 
262 
250 
200 
168 
160 


310 
254 
250 
198 
169 
153 


175 
100 
117 

78 
158 

89 


171 
103 
121 
75 
154 
111 


179 
100 
116 

79 
158 

82 


23 

7 

13 

10 
5 
4 


24 

7 

12 

10 

7 
4 


23 


Ward 2 


7 


Ward 3 


11 


Ward 4 


10 


Ward 5 . 


5 


Marlborough 


5 




35 
30 
47 


41 
30 
48 


41 
30 

46 


26 
11 
26 


27 
11 
26 


32 
11 

26 


"8 


"8 






8 


Richmond 






105 


107 


105 


29 


29 


28 








Roxbury , 


8 


9 


7 


4 


5 


5 










23 
37 
29 

149 
98 

226 


23 

37 

29 

158 

101 

225 


22 
33 
29 

157 
99 

218 


19 
11 

15 
159 

95 
252 


19 

15 

14 

163 

98 
251 


17 
10 
12 

1«2 
95 

243 


8 
2 

'l2 
4 


8 

2 

'ii 

4 


8 




2 








1.2 


Troy 


4 


Walpole 




Westmoreland 


69 


71 


69 


48 


46 


49 


4 


4 


4 


Winchester 


260 


279 


259 


194 


201 


196 


3 

111 


3 
111 


4 


Totals 


3,331 


3,379 


3,302 


2,183 


2,233 


2.168 


110 







NEW HAMPSHIRE 


MANUAL. 






431 








County 


County 


Register 




Sheriff. 


Solicitor. 


Treasurer. 


of De 


eds. 


SULLIVAN 














ft 




COUNTY. 


c3 




a 

o 

so 








f- 


•G 




(H 


-tf 


•tf 


u 


"* 


> 


03 




d 






w 








.C 




O 


d 


o3 


Jfl 


fc 


c 


e 


f- 
















P 






c3 




•S A 




03 








pq 


& 1 


& 1 O 


Ph 


H 


« 


w 


Acworth 


68 


39 


62 


48 


70 


41 


72 


38 




200 


155 


193 


159 


219 


146 


193 


146 


Claremont 


701 


798 


797 


683 


655 


801 


826 


615 


Cornish 


130 


49 


127 


58 


117 


57 


125 


53 




60 


27 


49 


26 


50 


23 


56 


20 


Goshen 


39 


33 


43 


28 


42 


28 


45 


26 


Grantham 


40 


39 


35 


40 


36 


40 


41 


36 




39 


32 


39 


33 


39 


32 


38 


32 




48 


40 


38 


46 


41 


42 


44 


45 




491 


392 


503 


342 


528 


307 


587 


289 


Plainfield 


125 

71 


98 
39 


115 

67 


105 

45 


119 

70 


99 
41 


122 
71 


96 




41 




144 


106 


121 


122 


129 


110 


140 


108 


Unity 


69 


43 


60 


56 


60 


52 


65 


42 


Washington 


44 


31 


42 


32 


41 


31 


41 


33 








Totals 


2,269 


1,921 


2,291 


1,823 


2,216 


1,850 


2,466 


1,620 



432 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 





Register 






County 








of Probate. 




Commissioners. 






SULLIVAN 










m 






COUNTY. 


t-i 










*6 




—Concluded. 


_ 


»« 




u 




TS 




O 


u 


u 


A 


B ' * 




hi 




ft 

a 

M 


u 
M 


a 
® 

< 


o 
pq 


Sande 
Fitch, 


u 
eS 

H 






71 


41 


67 


69 


66 42 


42 


44 


Charlestown 


189 


151 


187 


185 


194 


158 


150 


147 




748 

127 

49 

44 


650 
54 

26 
26 


642 
121 
51 
43 
39 
37 


699 
127 

44 
40 
39 
38 


792 
127 
43 
41 
37 
38 


899 
57 
25 
29 
38 
34 


652 
52 
27 
35 
38 
32 


627 




52 




33 




28 




37 37 
39 32 


40 




33 




43 46 
544 316 
120 98 


47 
614 
122 


43 
528 
120 


44 
548 
121 


42 

259 

97 


44 

305 

98 


42 




291 


Plainfield 


97 




68 44 
136 115 


71 
139 


67 
110 


69 
127 


41 
109 


44 
143 


44 


Sunapee 


113 


Unity 


62 j 43 

41 32 


64 
42 


66 
42 


67 
43 


49 
33 


46 
32 


46 




31 






Totals 


2,318 1,711 


2,286 


2,217 


2,357 1 1,912 


1,740 


1,668 







NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



433 



GRAFTON 
COUNTY. 



Sheriff. 



Alexandria 

Ashland 

Bath 

Benton 

Bethlehem . 
Bridgewater 

Bristol 

Campton . . . 

Canaan 

Dorchester . 

Easton 

Ellsworth . 

Enfield 

Franconia 
Grafton — 

Groton . 

Hanover . . 
Haverhill . 
Hebron .... 
Holderness 
Landaff . . . 
Lebanon .. 

Lincoln 

Lisbon 

Littleton . . 
Livermore 
Lyman .... 

Lyme 

Monroe . . . 
Orange .... 
Orf ord .... 
Piermont . . 
Plymouth . 
Rumney 
Thornton . 
Warren . .. 
Waterville 
Wentworth 
Woodstock 

Totals . 



59 

179 

94 

14 

100 

24 

200 

122 



82 
178 



19 
149 



130 



224 


127 


31 


15 


13 


31 1 


7 


4 : 


189 


114 


49 


74 


89 


81 


28 


20 


233 


175 


524 


277 


18 


29 


117 


63 


38 


59 


590 


532 


52 


33 


306 


282 


487 


554 


4 


2 


37 


44 


140 


59 


46 


23 


20 


21 


92 


63 


70 


53 


341 


247 


106 


101 


71 


57 


82 


68 


7 




42 


72 


85 


60 


.930 


4,081 



County 
Solicitor. 



57 

ITS 
93 
16 

105 
23 

199 

112 

220 

32 

13 

7 

187 
50 
89 
25 

234 

531 
18 

112 
37 

607 
53 

311 

482 

4 

39 

138 
44 
20 
91 
70 

318 
84 
76 
81 
7 
42 



County 
Treasurer. 



82 

177 
98 
18 

147 
26 

129 
64 

124 

14 

31 

4 

116 
77 
80 
20 

171 

279 

62 

60 

509 

33 

276 

562 

2 

49 

57 

25 

21 

61 

52 

254 

123 

57 



25 4,885 I 4,093 



57 

172 

112 

14 

104 

22 

195 

113 

222 

32 

14 

7 

190 

52 

90 

25 

242 

515 

18 

109 

40 

614 

51 

340 

493 

4 

48 

137 

44 

10 

02 

71 

318 

or, 

74 

81 

7 

4? 

77 



84 
19 

146 
28 

132 
64 

123 

14 

30 

4 

113 
74 
79 
20 

157 

275 
30 
65 
51 

482 
33 

2.-.1 

549 
2 
38 
5.1 
21 
18 

eo 

52 
256 
105 

56 

70 

"72 



3,963 



26 



434 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Register 
of Deeds. 



GRAFTON 

COUNTY. 
—Continued. 



Register 
of Probate. 



Alexandria . 

Ashland 

Bath 

Benton 

Bethlehem . 
Bridgewater 

Bristol 

Campton ... 

Canaan 

Dorchester . 

Easton 

Ellsworth . , 

Enfield 

Franconia . . 

Grafton 

Groton 

Hanover 

Haverhill . . . 

Hebron 

Holderness . 

Landaff 

Lebanon 

Lincoln 

Lisbon 

Littleton ... 
Livermore . . 

Lyman 

Lyme 

Monroe 

Orange 

Orf ord 

Piermont ... 
Plymouth . . 
Rumney 
Thornton . . . 

Warren 

Waterville 
Wentworth 
Woodstock . 



Totals 5,069 3,949 



59 

183 

99 

14 

105 

26 

214 

118 

227 

32 

14 

7 

191 

50 

94 

28 

249 

541 

20 

112 

40 

619 

50 

313 

494 

4 

34 

138 

47 

21 

94 

73 

350 

106 

78 

90 

7 

45 



82 

174 
92 
19 

148 
24 

121 
67 

124 

14 

30 

4 

110 
75 
79 
20 

153 

275 



58 

481 

34 

278 

547 

2 

45 

56 

24 

19 

59 

51 

240 

99 

55 

66 

"ii 

61 



58 

177 

111 

15 

103 

23 

205 

116 

224 

32 

14 

7 

191 

51 

91 

25 

254 

549 

19 

111 

42 

612 

51 

306 

489 

4 

36 

137 

47 

20 

97 

76 

332 

102 

71 

82 

7 

42 

81 



177 
84 
19 

148 
25 

124 
63 

123 

14 

30 

4 

111 
75 
78 
19 

148 

249 
29 
62 
57 

485 
33 

281 

554 
2 
52 
56 
23 
19 
59 
49 

245 

100 
58 
67 

"74 
62 



5,010 3,940 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



435 



GRAFTON 

COUNTY. 

—Concluded. 



County Commissioners. 



ft 




t* 


a 


s= 


13 




e 




cc 


U 






fH 


c 




o 

CO 


CP 




C 






O 


pj 


3 


Eh 




Alexandria 
Ashland . . . 

Bath 

Benton 

Bethlehem . 
Bridgewater 

Bristol 

Campton ... 
Canaan .... 
Dorchester . 

Easton 

Ellsworth . . 
Enfield ...,. 
Pranconia 

Grafton 

Groton 

Hanover . . . 
Haverhill . . 

Hebron 

Holderness 
Landaff .... 
Lebanon ... 
Lincoln .... 

Lisbon 

Littleton ... 
Livermore . 

Lyman 

Lyme 

Monroe 

Orange 

Orford 

Piermont .. 
Plymouth . . 

Rumney 

Thornton . . , 
Warren .... 
Waterville . 



59 

198 

99 

14 

102 

26 

202 

116 

221 

32 

13 

7 



87 
27 

221 

523 
19 

123 
38 

610 
53 

308 

491 

4 

35 

140 
47 
18 
93 
68 

333 

99 

85 

82 

7 



58 

179 

99 

14 

101 

24 

198 

113 

223 

30 

14 

7 

191 

36 

89 

25 

235 

523 

19 

112 

38 

610 

52 

304 

487 

4 

31 

148 

46 

18 

94 

76 

326 

99 

73 



58 

180 

101 

14 

113 

23 

201 

113 

220 

30 

13 

7 

187 

50 

80 

25 

234 

520 

19 

111 

38 

605 

51 

312 

499 

4 

33 

140 

46 

17 

92 

70 

325 

96 

73 

82 

7 



81 

166 
90 
19 

148 
23 

128 
63 

123 

15 

30 

4 

115 
77 
82 
20 

200 

272 
30 
59 
59 

494 
32 

278 

551 



57 
25 
19 
61 
51 
243 
103 
55 



81 

175 

91 

19 

150 

25 

131 

63 

123 

14 

30 

4 

111 

91 

81 

21 

162 

274 

29 

61 

58 

485 

32 

284 

553 

2 

46 

54 

23 

20 

59 

51 

247 

102 

56 



Wentworth 


42 
78 


45 
76 


43 

77 

4,909 


73 
61 


72 
63 


71 


Woodstock 


61 


Totals 


4,956 


4,904 


4,024 


4,012 


3,968 



81 

176 
90 
19 

149 
24 

129 
63 

130 

15 

31 

4 

111 
74 
90 
21 

160 



58 

476 

32 

274 

544 

2 

44 

55 

23 

26 

60 

51 

244 

103 

55 

67 



436 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



COOS 
COUNTY. 



Sheriff. 



Berlin — 

Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Carroll j 

Clarksville 

Colebrook ! 

Columbia 

Dalton 

Dummer 

Errol ! 

G-orham 

Jefferson 

Lancaster 

Milan 

Northumberland 

Pittsburg 

Randolph 

Shelburne 

Stark 

Stewartstown 

Stratford 

Wentworth's Loca'n 
Whitefield 



Totals 



ft 




*3 









eg 






>0 


U 




. 


£ 


t 










o 


n 


Eh 


257 


248 


317 


237 


309 


98 


104 


86 


83 


84 


17 


45 


271 


222 


86 


43 


58 


45 


28 


14 


29 


29 


233 


164 


137 


126 


426 


308 


90 


59 


196 


254 


90 


44 


15 


9 


28 


16 


50 


64 


138 


87 


62 


142 


3 


9 


255 


185 


3,282 


2.618 



Solicitor. 



ft 




n 

03 




U 


•d 


CD 

M 
a 


05 
CD 

o 

ft 


153 


329 


181 


349 


174 


186 


42 


116 


82 


84 


16 


45 


220 


244 


86 


43 


58 


45 


17 


26 


18 


34 


125 


257 


135 


127 


475 


257 


75 


71 


202 


210 


88 


46 


10 


13 


25 


18 


41 


67 


122 


102 


59 


140 


6 


3 


253 


181 


2.663 


2.993 



Treasurer. 





ht 


is 


m 




£ 


> 


3 


to 








* 


< 


o 


21 


152 


333 




197 


334 


57 


159 


203 


21 


64 


117 


1 


82 


84 




17 


44 




363 


146 




93 


39 




58 


45 




16 


25 




20 


31 


17 


146 


218 




133 


126 


1 


442 


281 


1 


83 


66 


24 


183 


228 




90 


42 




14 


9 


1 


24 


18 


2 


42 


65 




140 


86 




63 


136 




9 


3 


2 


244 


182 


148 


2.834 


2,861 



59 



2 
155 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



437 





Register 
of Deeds. 


Register 
of Probate. 


COOS COUNTY 
—Continued. 


o 


A 


to 

u 

03 


03 


"S 

OS 


m 

.5 
"3 

o 

« 


Berlin- 


162 

241 

161 

69 

81 

18 

257 

84 

56 

18 

25 

159 

139 

415 

82 

212 

91 

13 

28 

46 

140 

47 

3 

259 


319 

314 

205 

105 

86 

43 

239 

46 

47 

23 

29 

204 

121 

335 

62 

218 

44 

10 

15 

62 

93 

158 

9 

182 


21 

'60 
21 

1 

'l8 

1 ... 

"l 

1 

19 

"i 

2 


1 

158 308 
199 335 
170 184 


21 


Ward 2 . 




Ward 3 


61 


Ward 4 


64 
82 
17 

283 
86 
58 
17 
20 

163 


117 
83 
44 

164 
40 
45 
24 
30 

201 


21 




1 




























20 




142 120 

505 230 

82 61 






1 




1 




229 
90 
13 
26 
49 

132 

70 

3 


185 

42 

9 

15 

62 

87 

133 




22 












1 


Stark 


2 














Whitefield 


258 174 


2 








Totals 


2,806 2.969 


147 


2,916 2.702 


153 















438 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



COOS 
COUNTY. 
-Concluded. 



Berlin- 
Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Carroll 

Clarksville 

Colebrook 

Columbia 

Dalton 

Dummer 

Errol 

Gorham 

Jefferson 

Lancaster 

Milan 

Northumberland . 

Pittsburg 

Randolph 

Shelburne 

Stark 

Stewartstown 

Stratford 

Wentworth's Locat'n 

Whitefield 

Totals 



271 

336 

261 

101 

82 

11 

141 

80 

56 

19 

16 

174 

138 

424 

82 

194 

56 

12 

25 

44 

123 

46 

*224 



2,916 



174 

238 

203 

71 

82 

15 

193 

85 

57 

18 

17 

164 

137 



202 
84 
13 
25 
45 

124 

55 

3 

252 



2,768 



County Commissioners. 



211 

175 

57 

82 

20 

222 

81 

56 

17 

16 

163 

141 

453 

82 

212 

89 

13 

26 

46 

144 

57 

3 

239 



2,767 



107 

72 

84 

50 

433 

52 

45 

23 

46 

195 

125 

296 

66 

219 

82 

9 

15 
65 
107 
152 
12 
189 



2,856 



302 

303 

166 

112 

83 

41 

170 

43 

44 

24 

31 

200 

120 

266 

62 

191 

44 

9 

15 

64 

77 

136 

9 

173 



259 

237 

120 

95 

84 

46 

182 

43 

48 

24 

30 

197 

126 

289 

61 

200 

44 

8 

15 

65 

89 

138 

9 

212 



21 



2,685 2,621 



12 



2 
132 



130 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 439 

STATE GOVERNMENT, 1917-1919. 



GOVERNOR. 



January, 1917, to January, 1919. Constitution, Part II, Art. 41. Salary, 
$3,000. Laws of 1907, ch. 90. 

HENRY W. KEYES, r., Haverhill. 

Governor's Secretary, HARLAN C. PEARSON, Concord. 



COUNCILORS. 

January, 1917, to January, 1919. Constitution, Part II, Art. 59. Compen- 
sation, $8 per day and expenses. Laws of 1905, ch. 110. 

First District — MILES W. GRAY, r., Columbia. 
Second District — CHARLES W. VARNEY, r., Rochester. 
Third District — MOISE VERRETTE, d., Manchester. 
Fourth District — WILLIAM D. SWART, r., Nashua. 
Fifth District — EDWARD H. CARROLL, r„ Warner. 



The following titles are arranged alphabetically with regard to the dis- 
tinguishing word. Members of boards, commissions, etc., are listed in the 
order in which their respective terms of office expire. 

ADJUTANT-GENERAL. 

Appointed by the Governor. Term expires with term of Governor. Salary, 
$1,500. Laws of 1911, ch. 1; 1895, ch. 103. 

CHARLES W. HOWARD, r., Nashua. 
May 1, 1915, to January, 1919. 



TRUSTEES OF THE NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE OF 
AGRICULTURE AND THE MECHANIC ARTS. 

The Governor, and President of the College, ex officiis ; two persons elected 
by the Alumni, and nine others appointed by the Governor and Council, 
one at least from each councilor district, and not more than five of the 
trustees appointed by the Governor and Council shall belong to the 
same political party, and at least seven of them shall be practical 
farmers. Term, three years. Laws of 1913, ch. 214. 



440 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



EDWARD THOMPSON FAIRCHILD (President of the College), 
Durham. 

HARVEY L. BOUTWELL, Maiden, Mass. 
Elected by the Alumni, September 1, 1911, to September 1, 1917. 

EDWARD H. WASON, Nashua. 
Elected by the Alumni, January 16, 1906, to August 1, 1919. 

HENRY C. PHILLIPS, d., Haverhill. 
November 24, 1916, to July 17, 1917. 

WALTER DREW, d., Colebrook. 
August 30, 1902, to August 30, 1917. 

GEORGE H. BINGHAM, d., Manchester. 
December 2, 1908, to December 2, 1917. 

WILLIAM H. CALDWELL, r., Peterborough. 
July 29, 1912, to July 29, 1918. 

RICHARD W. SULLOWAY, d., Franklin. 
May 13, 1909, to October 9, 1918. 

DWIGHT HALL, r., Dover. 
October 29, 1915, to October 17, 1918. 

JAMES A. TUFTS, r., Exeter. 
January 10, 1914, to June 14, 1919. 

EUGENE S. DANIELL, r., Greenland. 

December 31, 1914, to October 7, 1915. 

June 14, 1916, to June 14, 1919. 

ROY D. HUNTER, r., Claremont. 
June 14, 1916, to June 14, 1919. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

Appointments by Governor and Council. Laws of 1913, ch. 163; 
1915, ch. 177. 

Commissioner of Agriculture. 

Term, three years, and until successor is qualified. Salary, $2,500. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 441 

ANDREW L. FELKER, Meredith. 
January 10, 1914, to September 1, 1916. 

Advisory Board. 

Ten men, one from each county, actively engaged in agriculture as an occu- 
pation ; not over six to be of the same political party. Term, three 
years, after expiration of first term. Compensation, $3 per day and 
expenses. Laws of 1915, ch. 177, sect. 3. 

Carroll County, JOHN E. POTTER, r., Conway. 
Merrimack County, JAMES C. FARMER, r., Newbury. 
Strafford County, SAMUEL O. TITUS, ind., Rollinsford. 
September 1, 1915, to September 1, 1917. 

Cheshire County, MERRILL MASON, d., Marlborough. 
Coos County, MILES W. GRAY, r., Columbia. 
Hillsborough County, GORDON WOODBURY, d., Bedford, 
Rockingham County, WESLEY ADAMS, r., Londonderry. 
September 1, 1915, to September 1, 1918. 

Belknap County, JEREMIAH W. SANBORN, r., Gilmanton. 
Grafton County, LYNFORD E. TUTTLE, d., Grafton. 
Sullivan County, FRED A. ROGERS, r., Plainfield. 
September 1, 1915, to September 1, 1919. 

Deputy. 

Appointed by the Commissioner of Agriculture with the approval of the 
Governor and Council for the Suppression of Gypsy and Brown-Tail 
Moths. 

WALTER C. O'KANE, Durham. 
Appointed March 27, 1914. Salary, $1,600. 



STATE BOARD OF CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION. 

Three persons, one annually, appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, 
three years (from July 1). Compensation, $8 per day and expenses. 
Laws of 1913, ch. 186. 

GEORGE A. TENNEY, Claremont. 
October 10, 1913, to July 1, 1917. 



442 IEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

JOHN H. NEAL (Chairman), Portsmouth. 

October 10, 1913, to July 1, 1918. 

MICHAEL F. CONNOLLY, Manchester. 

July 1, 1916, to July 1, 1919. 



BALLOT LAW COMMISSIONERS. 

The Attorney-General, ex officio; two other persons (from two political par- 
ties) appointed by the Governor and Council on or before the first day 
of September preceding a biennial election. Laws of 1897, ch. 78, 
sect. 9. 

CHARLES C. ROGERS, d., Tilton. 

August 3, 1906, to August 30, 1918. 

PRANK J. SULLOWAY, r., Concord. 

August 30, 1914, to August 30, 1918. 



BOARD OF BANK COMMISSIONERS. 

Three persons appointed by the Governor and Council, not more than two 
of whom shall be of the same political party; the chairman to be desig- 
nated in his appointment. Term, six years, after expiration of first 
term, and until successor is appointed. Vacancy to be filled for unex- 
pired part of a term. Salary of chairman $3,000; of other members, 
$2,500 each. Laws of 1915, ch. 58. 

GUY H. CUTTER, d., Concord. 

May 1, 1915, to May 1, 1917. 

FREDERIC S, NUTTING, r., Manchester. 

May 1, 1915, to May 1, 1919. 

JAMES O. LYFORD, r. (Chairman), Concord. 

May 19, 1915, to May 19, 1921. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 443 

STATE BOARD OF CHARITIES AND CORRECTION. 

Secretary of the State Board of Health, ex officio; five other persons, one 
annually, appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, five years. 
Laws of 1897, ch. 91; 1895, ch. 116, sect. 4. 

KATE HOWARD BROWN, Whitefield. 

October 15, 1907, to July 2, 1917. 

JAMES F. BRENNAN, Peterborough. 

October 27, 1899, to July 9, 1918. 

MARY I. WOOD, Portsmouth. 

May 17, 1911, to August 29, 1919. 

HERBERT E. KENDALL, Nashua. 

July 9, 1915, to July 9, 1920. 

SHERMAN E. BURROUGHS (Chairman), Manchester. 

August 28, 1901, to July 9, 1921. 

Secretary. 

WILLIAM J. AHERN, Concord. 
Appointed by the Board, June, 1901. Salary, $1,800. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE DENTAL BOARD. 

Three persons appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, three years. 
Vacancy to be filled for unexpired part of a term. Compensation, $5 
per day and expenses. P. S., ch. 134; Laws of 1913, ch. 144. 

CLARENCE S. COPELAND, Rochester. 

February 4, 1914, to February 4, 1917. 

HARRY L. WATSON (Secretary), Manchester. 

November 13, 1914, to November 13, 1917. 

GEORGE A. BOWERS (President), Nashua. 
June 16, 1897, to May 5, 1918. 



444 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

BOARD OF EXCISE COMMISSIONERS. 

Three persons appointed by the Governor and Council, one of whom shall 
be commissioned as chairman, and another as clerk and treasurer. Not 
more than two shall be of the same political party. Term, six years, 
after expiration of first term, and until successor is qualified. Vacancy 
to be filled for unexpired part of a term (which ends August 31). 
Salary of chairman, $2,500; of other members, $1,800 each. Laws of 
1915, ch. 110. 

PRANK R. ORDWAY, r. (Clerk and Treasurer), Milford. 

July 1, 1915, to August 31, 1918. 

DWIGHT HALL, r. (Chairman), Dover. 

July 28, 1916, to August 31, 1920. 

ROBERT JACKSON, d., Concord. 

July 1, 1915, to August 31, 1922. 

Special Agents. 

Appointed by the Board with approval of Governor and Council. 
Term, one year. 

CHARLES R. QUINN, Portsmouth. 

February 7, 1916, to February 7, 1917. 

BEN O. ALDRICH, Keene. 

November 8, 1915, to November 8, 1917. 



FISH AND GAME COMMISSIONER. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, three years from date of 
commission, and until successor is appointed. Salary, $1,800. Laws 
of 1913, ch. 165. 

GEORGE A. McINTIRE, Milford. 

June 1, 1916, to June 1, 1919. 

Wardens. 

Ten fish and game wardens may be appointed by the commissioner, with 
the approval of the Governor and Council. Laws of 1915, ch. 133, 
sect. 68. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 445 

ELVERTON C. BERRY, Farmington. 

JAMES R. BLODGETT, Pittsburg. 

CARL F. DOLLOFF, Laconia. 

FRANK W. LOUGEE, Plymouth. 

DENNIS F. SCANNELL, Manchester. 

PETER SMITH, Concord. 

GEORGE P. WELLINGTON, Jaffrey. 

JOHN WENTWORTH (Chief Warden), Hudson. 



FORESTRY COMMISSION. 

Three persons, one annually, appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, 
three years. Laws of 1909, ch. 128. 

JASON E. TOLLES, Nashua. 

December 23, 1904, to May 1, 1917. 

GEORGE B. LEIGHTON, Dublin. 

May 1, 1915, to May 1, 1918. 

W. ROBINSON BROWN, Berlin. 

May 1, 1909, to May 1, 1919. 

State Forester. 

Appointed by the Forestry Commission. Salary, not exceeding $2,500. 
Laws of 1913, ch. 159. 

EDGAR C. HIRST, Concord. 



STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

The Governor and Attorney-General, ex officiis; three Physicians and one 
Civil Engineer appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, four 
years. Vacancy to be filled for the unexpired part of a term. P. S., 
ch. 107. Salary of Secretary, $2,500. 

ROBERT FLETCHER, Hanover. 

July 9, 1895, to September 3, 1917. 

DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, M. D., Concord. 

September 3, 1913, to September 3, 1917. 



446 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

GEORGE C. WILKINS, M. D., Manchester. 
February 2, 1915, to October 22, 1919. 

IRVING A. WATSON, M. D. (Secretary), Concord. 
September 16, 1881, to October 22, 1919. 

Laboratory of Hygiene Staff. 

Appointed by the Board of Health. Laws of 1901, Ch. 23. 

IRVING A. WATSON (Director), Concord. 
CHARLES D. HOWARD (Chemist), Concord. 
WALDO L. ADAMS (Assistant Chemist), Concord. 
HOWARD N. KINGSFORD (Bacteriologist), Hanover. 
CHARLES DUNCAN (Bacteriologist), Concord. 
WALLACE F. PURRINGTON (Inspector), Concord. 

The State Board of Heatlh shall constitute a Commission of Lunacy. 
P. S., ch. 10, sect. 32. 



HIGHWAY COMMISSIONER. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, five years from date of 
appointment, and until successor is qualified. Salary, not exceeding 
$4,500. Laws of 1915, ch. 103. 

FREDERIC E. EVERETT, Concord. 

September 1, 1915, to September 1, 1920. 

Salary, $4,000. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF STATE INSTITUTIONS. 

Ten persons appointed by the Governor and Council, and designated to serve 
with special reference to one of five institutions. Term, five years, 
after expiration of first term, and until successor is qualified. Vacancy 
to be filled for unexpired part of a term. Compensation, expenses. 
Laws of 1915, ch. 176. 

School for Feeble-Minded Children. 

WILLIAM H. MOSES, Tilton. 
May 28, 1915, to May 28, 1917. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 447 

JOHN J. BROPHY, Concord. 
May 28, 1915, to May 28, 1919. 

State Industrial School. 

ABRAM W. MITCHELL, Epping. 

May 28, 1915, to May 28, 1917. 

GEORGE H. WARREN (Chairman of Board), Manchester. 

May 28, 1915, to May 28, 1921. 

State Hospital. 

STILLMAN H. BAKER, Hillsborough. 

May 28, 1915, to May 28, 1918. 

JAMES E. FRENCH, Moultonborough. 

May 28, 1915, to May 28, 1920. 

State Prison. 

LYFORD A. MERROW, Ossipee. 

May 28, 1915, to May 28, 1918. 

JOHN G. M. GLESSNER (Secretary of Board), Bethlehem. 

May 28, 1915, to May 28, 1921. 

State Sanatorium for Consumptives. 

ALBERT J. PRECOURT, Manchester. 

May 28, 1915, to May 28, 1919. 
WILLIAM E. LAWRENCE, Haverhill. 
May 28, 1915, to May 28, 1920. 
The following Officers are appointed by the Board: 

School for Feeble-Minded Children. 

BENJAMIN W. BAKER, (Superintendent), Laconia. 



448 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

State Industrial School. 

WILLIAM C. MORTON (Superintendent), Manchester. 

State Hospital. 

CHARLES P. BANCROFT (Superintendent), Concord. 

State Prison. 

CHARLES H. ROWE (Warden), Concord. 

REV. WHITMAN S. BASSETT (Chaplain and Parole Officer), Boscawen. 

RUSSELL WILKINS (Physician), Concord. 

State Sanatorium for Consumptives. 

JOHN M. WISE (Superintendent), Glencliff. 
Purchasing Agent. 

Term not limited. Salary, $3,000. 
HORATIO K. LIBBEY, Concord. 



INDEXER OF STATE RECORDS. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council, May 31, 1898. Council Records, 
Vol. 17, p. 162. Salary, $1,000. 

FRANK BATTLES, Concord. 



INSURANCE COMMISSIONER. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, three years, and until suc- 
cessor is qualified. Salary, $2,000. P. S., ch. 167. 

ROBERT J. MERRILL, r., Concord. 

November 23, 1911, to December 31, 1914. 
January 13, 1915, to January 13, 1918. 



LABOR COMMISSIONER. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, three years, and until 
successor is qualified. Salary, $1,600. Laws of 1911, ch. 198. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 449 

JOHN S. B. DAVIE, v., Concord. 
June 8, 1911, to June 8, 1917. 



LABORATORY OF HYGIENE STAFF. 

See State Board of Health. 



TRUSTEES OF STATE LIBRARY. 

Three persons, one annually, appointed by the Governor and Council. 
Term, three years. Vacancy to be filled for unexpired part of a term. 
P. S., ch. 8. 

CHARLES G. JENNESS, r., Rochester. 

January 7, 1915, to November 10, 1917. 

EDWIN P. JONES, r., Manchester. 

November 13, 1915, to November 13, 1918. 

GEORGE W. STONE, d., Andover. 

February 7, 1914, to December 8, 1919. 

State Librarian. 

Appointed by Trustees of State Library. Term, not limited. 

ARTHUR H. CHASE, Concord. 

Appointed January 1, 1895. Salary, $2,500. 



COMMISSION OF LUNACY. 

See State Board of Health. 



450 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

MEDICAL REFEREES. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, five years from date of 
appointment. Laws of 1903, ch. 134; 1911, ch. 181. 

Rockingham County (2). 

Luther G. Dearborn, Jr., Derry. Term expires December 11, 1918. 
George E. Pender, Portsmouth. Term expires December 29, 1921. 

Strafford County (1). 

Walter J. Roberts, Rochester. Term expires May 29, 1918. 

Belknap County (1). 

Edwin P. Hodgdon, Laconia. Term expires May 29, 1918. 

Carroll County ( 1 ) . 

Benjamin Frank Home, Conway. Term expires May 29, 1918. 

Merrimack County (1). 

Chancey Adams, Concord. Term expires May 15, 1918. 

Hillsborough County (3). 

Prank B. Foster, Peterborough. Term expires May 29, 1918. 
Benjamin George Moran, Nashua. Term expires May 29, 1918. 
Maurice Watson, Manchester. Term expires May 29, 1918. 

Cheshire County (1). 

Frank M. Dinsmoor, Keene. Term expires May 15, 1918. 

Sullivan County (1). 

J. Leavitt Cain, Newport. Term expires May 29, 1918. 
Grafton County (3). 

Percy Bartlett, Hanover. Term expires May 15, 1918. 
Harry H. Boynton, Lisbon. Term expires June 5, 1918. 
William R. Garland, Plymouth. Term expires June 19, 1918. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 451 



Coos County (3). 

Guy W. Barbour, Stewartstown. Term expires October 3, 1917. 
Edward R. B. McGee, Berlin. Term expires May 29, 1918. 
Richard E. Wilder, Whitefield. Term expires June 5, 1918. 



BOARD OF REGISTRATION IN MEDICINE. 

ve persons, one annually, appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, 
five years, after expiration of first term, and until successor is qualified. 
Vacancy to be filled for unexpired part of a term (which ends April 
21). Laws of 1915, ch. 167. 

CHARLES W. ADAMS, Franklin. 

May 19, 1915, to April 21, 1917. 

WALTER T. CROSBY (Secretary), Manchester. 

May 19, 1915, to April 21, 1918. 

GEORGE H. SHEDD, Conway. 

May 19, 1915, to April 21, 1919. 

HOWARD N. KINGSFORD, Hanover. 

May 19, 1915, to April 21, 1920. 

HENRY M. WIGGIN, Whitefield. 

May 19, 1915, to April 21, 1921. 



COMMISSIONER OF MOTOR VEHICLES. 

>pointed by the Governor and Council. Term, five years, and until suc- 
cessor is qualified. Salary, $2,000. Laws of 1915, ch. 154. 

OLIN H. CHASE, Newport. 

September 12, 1916, to May 1, 1920. 



IE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE NEW HAMPSHIRE 
NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

ie Governor, and the Superintendent of Public Instruction,* ex offlciis; 
five other persons, one annually, appointed by the Governor and Coun- 
cil. Term, five years. Laws of 1903, ch, 3; 1909, ch. 157. 



c Henry C. Morrison (Secretary of Board), Concord. 



452 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

GEORGE H. WHITCHER, Berlin. 
February 4, 1912, to February 4, 1917. 

TRUE L. NORRIS, Portsmouth. 
January 10, 1914, to February 4, 1918. 

CHARLES W. VAUGHAN, Laconia. 
February 4, 1914, to February 4, 1919. 

JAMES H. FASSETT, Nashua. 
November 22, 1899, to February 4, 1920. 

FRANK H. FOSTER, Claremont. 
September 29, 1911, to May 17, 1921. 



BOARD OF REGISTRATION IN OPTOMETRY. 

Three optometrists, one physician, and one oculist, one annually, appointed 
by the Governor and Council. Term, five years, and until successor is 
qualified. Compensation, $5 per day and expenses. Laws of 1911, 
ch. 167. 

EVARISTE C. TREMBLAY, M. p., Manchester. 

May 17, 1911, to May 17, 1917. 

CLAUDE M. SNEDEN, M. D., Littleton. 

August 15, 1913, to May 17, 1918. 

JAMES S. SHAW, Franklin. 

May 17, 1914, to May 17, 1919. 

WILLIAM E. WRIGHT, Keene. 

May 17, 1911, to May 17, 1920. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 453 

GEORGE H. BROWN (President), Manchester. 
May 17, 1911, to May 17, 1921. 



COMMISSION OF PHARMACY AND PRACTICAL 
CHEMISTRY. 

Three persons appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, three years, 
and until successor is qualified. Vacancy to be filled for unexpired 
part of a term. Compensation, $5 per day and expenses. P. S., ch. 
135; Laws of 1909, ch. 116. 

HERBERT E. RICE (Secretary), Nashua. 
November 10, 1911, to November 13, 1917. 

ALBERT S. WETHERELL. Exeter. 

August 17, 1915, to August 17, 1918. 

JAMES L. DOW, Lancaster. 

November 24, 1916, to November 24, 1919. 



COMMISSIONERS OF PILOTAGE, PORT OF PORTSMOUTH. 

Three persons may be appointed by the Governor and Council. Term not 
limited. P. S., ch. 120. 

CHARLES W. GRAY, Portsmouth. 

Appointed March 19, 1895. 

HERBERT O. PRIME, Portsmouth. 

Appointed December 4, 1906. 



PISCATAQUA DAM COMMISSION. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council. Laws of 1909, ch. 1* 
.HENRY W. ANDERSON, Exeter. 
Appointed April 9, 1909. 



454 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

OLIVER L. FRISBEE, Portsmouth. 

Appointed April 28, 1909. 
CHARLES W. GRAY, Portsmouth. 

Appointed March 2, 1910. 



POLICE COMMISSIONS. 

Three persons appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, three years 
(from September 1), and until successor is qualified. Not more 
two shall be of the same political party. Laws of 1913, ch. 148. 

Berlin. 

Thomas W. Estabrook, d. September 1, 1913, to September 1, 1917. 
Thomas H. Samson, r. September 1, 1915, to September 1, 1918. 
Elmer N. Whitcomb, r. September 1, 1916, to September 1, 1919. 

Dover. 

Walter Delaney, d. August 30, 1915, to September 1, 1917. 
Henry A. Stone, r. September 1, 1915, to September 1, 1918. 
D'Orville L. Pinkham, r. August 30, 1915, to September 1, 1919. 

Exeter. 

John H. Elkins, d. December 1, 1916, to September 1, 1917. 
Arthur 0. Fuller, r. September 10, 1915, to September 1, 1918. 
Samuel K. Bell, r. December 1, 1916, to September 1, 1919. 

Laconia. 

John M. Guay, d. September 1, 1913, to September 1, 1917. 
Fred C. Sanborn, r. September 1, 1915, to September 1, 1918. 
Elmer S. Tilton, r. September 1, 1916, to September 1, 1919. 

Manchester. 

Frank W. Sargeant, d. September 1, 1913, to September 1, 1917. 
Oscar F. Moreau, r. September 1, 1915, to September 1, 1918. 
Thomas B. Donnelly, r. May 26, 1916, to September 1, 1919. 

Nashua. 

Roscoe F. Proctor, d. September 1, 1913, to September 1, 1917. 
Andros B. Jones, r. December 31, 1915, to September 1, 1918. 
Herbert L. Flather, r. September 1, 1916, to September 1, 1919. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 455 

Portsmouth. 

Michael J. Griffin, d. September 1, 1913, to September 1, 1917. 
George B. Wallace, r. September 10, 1915, to September 1, 1918. 
Frank E. Leavitt, r. September 1, 1913, to September 1, 1919. 

Somersworth. 

Henry C. Harden, d. September 1, 1913, to September 1, 1917. 

Fortunat J. Gagnon, r. May 26, 1916, to September 1, 1918. 

J. Godfrey Hammond, r. September 1, 1916, to September 1, 1919. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, not limited. Salary, not 
exceeding $4,000. Laws of 1913, ch. 149. 

HENRY C. MORRISON, Concord. 

• October 25, 1904; appointed under present law, July 11, 1913. 

Deputies. 

Appointed by the Superintendent. Salaries, not exceeding $2,500 each. 

GEORGE H. WHITCHER, Concord. 
HARRIET L. HUNTRESS, Concord. 
ERNEST L. BUTTERFIELD, Concord. 



PUBLIC PRINTING COMMISSION. 

Five State Officers, appointed biennially by the Governor and Council. 
Laws of 1913, chs. 76 and 132. Term expires July 1, 1917. 

FRANK BATTLES (Clerk, ex officio), Concord. 
ARTHUR H. CHASE, Concord. 
OLIN H. CHASE, Newport. 
GUY H. CUTTER, Concord. 
HOBART PILLSBURY, Manchester. 



456 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION. 

Three persons (one of whom shall be commissioned as chairman) appointed 
by the Governor and Council. Term, six years, and until successor is 
qualified. Vacancy to be filled for unexpired part of a term (which 
ends first Monday in June). Salary of chairman, $3,700; of other 
members, $3,500 each. Laws of 1911, ch. 164; 1913, ch. 145; 1915, 
ch. 99. 

EDWARD C. NILES, r. (Chairman), Concord. 

June, 1911, to June, 1917. 

THOMAS W. D. WORTHEN, d., Hanover. 

June, 1911, to June, 1919. 

WILLIAM T. GUNNISON, r., Rochester. 

June, 1915, to June, 1921. 

Clerk. 

WALTER H. TIMM, Concord. 
Appointed by the Commission. Salary, $2,700. 

Chief Engineer. 

JOHN W. STORRS, Concord. 
Appointed by the Commission. Salary, $2,500. 



PURCHASING AGENT. 

See Board of Trustees of State Institutions. 



SECRETARY OF STATE. 

Elected by the Legislature. Term, two years. Const., Part II, Art. 
Salary, $4,000. Laws of 1911, ch. 9. 

EDWIN C. BEAN, r., Belmont. 
May 1, 1915, to January, 1917. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 457 

Deputy Secretary of State. 

Appointed by the Secretary of State. Const., Part II, Art. 68. Salary, 
$1,500. Laws of 1915, ch. 175. 

HOBART PILLSBURY, r., Manchester. 
Appointed May, 1915. 



BOARD OF MANAGERS OF THE NEW HAMPSHIRE 
SOLDIERS' HOME. 

The Governor (Chairman), and Department Commander Grand Army of 
the Republic, ex officiis ; five other persons, one annually, appointed by 
the Governor and Council. Term, five years, and until successor is 
qualified. P. S., ch. 13. 

CHARLES W. STEVENS, Nashua. 
September 13, 1889, to October 7, 1917. 

MESHACH H. BELL, Portsmouth. 

June 5, 1913, to August 18, 1918. 

WILLIAM A. BECKFORD, Bristol. 

September 29, 1911, to August 30, 1919. 

MORTIER L. MORRISON, Peterborough. 

September 9, 1900, to' September 9, 1920. 

ALBERT T. BARR, Manchester. 

July 16, 1907, to October 13, 1921. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STATE HOUSE. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, two years, and until suc- 
cessor is appointed. Salary, not to exceed $1,000. Laws of 1911, 
ch. 85. 

FRANK L. HAYES, Dover. 

September 1, 1915, to September 1, 1917. 



458 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

STATE TAX COMMISSION. 

Three persons (one of whom shall be of the leading minority party) ap- 
pointed by the Supreme Court and commissioned by the Governor. 
The chairman and secretary to be designated by the Court. Term, six 
years, and until successor is qualified. Vacancy to be filled for unex- 
pired part of a term (which ends March 31). Salary of secretary, 
$3,000; of other members, $2,500. Laws of 1911, ch. 169. 

ALBERT O. BROWN, r. (Chairman), Manchester. 
May 1, 1911, to March 31, 1917. 

JOHN T. AMET, d., Lancaster. 
May 1, 1911, to March 31, 1919. 

WILLIAM B. FELLOWS, r. (Secretary), Tilton. 
May 1, 1911, to March 31, 1921. 



STATE TREASURER. 

Elected by the Legislature. Term, two years. Const., Part II, Art 
Salary, $2,500. Laws of 1901, ch. 56. 



JOHN WESLEY PLUMMER, r., Concord. 
January, 1915, to January, 1917. 



Deputy State Treasurer. 

Appointed by the State Treasurer. Laws of 1891, ch. 6. Salary, $1,500. 
Laws of 1915, ch. 24. 



HENRY M. SHORT, r., Concord. 
Appointed March 1, 1915. 






NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 459 

COMMISSIONERS FOR THE PROMOTION OF UNIFORMITY 
OF LEGISLATION IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Three persons appointed by the Governor. Term, not limited. Laws of 

1893, ch. 84. 

IRA A. CHASE, Bristol. 
Appointed January 17, 1905. 

JOSEPH MADDEN, Keene. 
Appointed December 14, 1911. 

ROBERT L. MANNING, Manchester. 
Appointed November 29, 1912. 



BOARD OF VETERINARY EXAMINERS. 

Three persons appointed by the Governor. Term, three years, and until 
successor is qualified. Laws of 1901, ch. 59. 

GUY E. CHESLEY (President), Rochester. 
April 5, 1904, to March 28, 1917. 

HAROLD LEWIS, Nashua. 
May 19, 1915, to March 28, 1918. 

HENRY B. DUNTON, Manchester. 
March 28, 1916, to March 28, 1919. 



460 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

SEAIiERS OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

One person in each county, appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, 
until successor is appointed. P. S., ch. 125. 

Rockingham County. 

CHARLES W. ANDREWS, Portsmouth. Appointed May 19, 1915. 

Strafford County. 

HOWARD E. SMITH, Rochester. Appointed December 31, 1915. 

Belknap County. 

JULIAN F. TRASK, Laconia. Appointed April 30, 1915. 

Carroll County. 

(Vacancy) 
Merrimack County. 

OSCAR E. JEWELL, Warner. Appointed December 30, 1912. 

Hillsborough County. 
GEORGE V. HAMLIN, Manchester. Appointed April 30, 1915. 

Cheshire County. 

JEDEDIAH C. ESTABROOK, Keene. Appointed April 30, 1915. 

Sullivan County. 

EUGENE A. POLLARD, Newport. Appointed December 12, 1913. 

Grafton County. 

WILLIAM A. CHURCHILL, Lebanon. Appointed July 29, 1915. 

Coos County. 

(Vacancy) 



JCDICIAEY DEPARTMENT. 



SUPREME COURT. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, until seventy years of age. 
Const., Part II, Arts. 45 and 77. Salary, $4,500 each. Laws of 1913, 
ch. 141. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Date of 
Appoint- 
ment. 


Limita- 
tion by 
age. 


Chief Justice. 
?rank N. Parsons 


Franklin 


July 1, 1902 

Mar. 28, 1901 
Jan. 4, 1904 
Dec. 28, 1907 
Nov. 25, 1913 


Sept. 3, 1924 


Associate Justices. 
Reuben E. Walker 




Feb. 15, 1921 


John E. Young 


Exeter 


Jan 26, 1925 


lobert J. Peaslee 

SVilliam A. Plummer . . . 


Manchester 


Sept. 23, 1934 
Dec. 2, 1935 






SUPERIOR COU 


RT. 





Appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, until seventy years of age. 
Const., Part II, Arts. 45 and 77. Salary, $4,500 each. Laws of 1913, 
ch. 141. 



Name. 



Chief Justice. 

Robert G. Pike 

Associate Justices. 
Robert N. Chamberlin 

John Kivel 

Oliver W. Branch... 
William H. Sawyer. . 



Residence. 


Date of 
Appoint- 
ment. 


Limitation 
by Age. 


Dover 


Oct. 30, 1913 

Jan. 4, 1904 
May 20, 1913 
Nov. 7, 1913 
Dec. 12, 1913 


July 28, 1921 
July 24, 1926 




Apr. 29, 1925 


Manchester 

Concord 


Oct. 4, 1949 
Aug. 18, 1937 



461 



462 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



JTJDGES OF PROBATE 

Appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, until seventy years of age. 
Const., Part II, Arts. 45 and 77. 



County. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Date of 
Appoint- 
ment. 


Limitation 
by Age. 


Sal 
ary 


Rockingham . . 


Louis G. Hoyt . . . 


Kingston 


Sept. 2, 1902 


Feb. 23, 


1926 


$1,2( 


Strafford 


Chris. H. Wells. 


Somersworth . 


Mar. 15, 1898 


July 6, 


1923 


8( 


Belknap 


Frank P. Tilton. 


Laconia 


Aug. 17, 1912 


March 4, 


1950 


6( 


Carroll 


Sewall W. Abbott 


Wolf eboro . . . 


Dec. 27, 1889 


April 11, 


1929 


7( 


Merrimack . . . 


Chas. R. Corning 


Concord 


June 19, 1899 


Dec. 20, 


1925 


1.2C 


Hillsborough . 


Geo. A. Wagner. 


Manchester. . 


Jan. 7, 1912 


May 28, 


1943 


2,0C 


Cheshire 


Robert A. Ray . . 


Keene 


Feb. 6, 1906 


April 7, 


1921 


9C 
















Grafton 


Harry Bingham . . 


Littleton 


Nov. 25, 1913 


March 14, 


1934 


1,0C 


Coos . 


Alfred R. Evans. 


(Gorham 


Jan. 1, 1895 


March 21, 


1919 


9( 



ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, five years. Salary, $3,000. 
Const., Part II, Art. 45; P. S., ch. 17; Laws of 1911, ch. 190, sect. 8. 

JAMES P. TUTTLE, Manchester. 

January 20, 1912, to January 20, 1917. 

Assistant Attorney-General. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, five years, and until suc- 
cessor is qualified. Salary, $3,000. Laws of 1915, ch. 116, sect. 1. 

JOSEPH S. MATTHEWS, Concord. 

April 21, 1915, to April 21, 1920. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 463 



STATE REPORTER. 

Appointed by the Supreme Court. Term, not limited. Salary, $1,800. 
P. S., ch. 214; Laws of 1903, ch. 7. 

CRAWFORD D. HENNING, Lancaster. 



CLERK OF SUPREME COURT. 

Appointed by the Supreme Court. Term, not limited. Laws of 1901, ch. 

78, sect. 10. 

ARTHUR H. CHASE, Concord. 



CLERKS OF SUPERIOR COURTS. 

Appointed by the Superior Court. Term, not limited. Laws of 1901, ch. 

78, sect. 9. 



Rockingham County — CHARLES H. KNIGHT, Exeter. 
Strafford County — WILLIAM H. ROBERTS, Dover. 
Belknap County — EDWIN P. THOMPSON, Laconia. 
Carroll County — ARTHUR E. KENISON, Ossipee. 
Merrimack County — GEORGE M. FLETCHER, Concord. 
Hillsborough County — THOMAS D. LUCE, Nashua. 
Cheshire County — LEWIS W. HOLMES, Keene. 
Sullivan County — JOHN McCRILLIS, Newport. 
Grafton County — DEXTER D. DOW, Woodsville. 
Coos County — MOSES A. HASTINGS, Lancaster. 



SUPREME COURT. 

Law Terms. 

At Concord on the first Tuesday in each month, except July and August. 
Laws of 1901, ch. 78. 



464 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SUPERIOR COURT. 

Trial Terms. 

Laws of 1915, ch. 158. 



County. 



Rockingham 

Strafford . . 
Belknap . . . 
Carroll .... 

Merrimack . 
Hillsborough 

Cheshire 
Sullivan . . . 
Grafton . . . 

Coos 



Place. 



Exeter 

Portsmouth 

Dover 

Laconia 

Ossipee 

Concord 

Manchester 

Nashua 

Keene 

Newport 

Lebanon 

Plymouth 

Woodsville, in the town 
of Haverhill 

Lancaster 

Colebrook 

Berlin 



Time. 



2d Tues., 

3d Tues., 

3d Tues. 

1st Tues., 

3d Tues., 

4th Tues. 

1st Tues. 



Jan. 
May 
Oct. 

Feb., Sept. 

, March. Oct. 

, May 
, Dec. 



1st Tues., April, Oct. 



1st Tues. 
3d Tues. 



2d Tues. 
2d Tues. 



1st Tues. 
2d Tues. 



Jan., May 
Sept. 

April, Oct. 

May, .Nov. 

Jan. 
May 



2d Tues., Sept. 



1st Tues. 
1st Tues. 
1st Tues. 



April 
Sept. 
Dec. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 
TERMS OF PROBATE COURTS. 



465 



Place. 



Portsmouth 

Exeter 

Derry 



Dover 

Rochester . . 
Somersworth 
Farmington 



Laconia 



North Conway. . 
West Ossipee. . 
Ossipee Cor. . . . 
Sanbornville . . 



Concord 



Manchester 
Nashua . . . 



Hillsborough 

Bridge . . . 

Peterborough 



Milford . . . 
Greenville . 
Amherst . . . 
Francestown 



Keene . . . 
Claremont 



Newport 



Lebanon 
Plymouth 



Lancaster 
Berlin . . . 
Colebrook 
Gorham . 



Time. 



1st Tues., Jan., March, May, July, Sept., 

Nov. 
2d and 4th Tues. each month, except Aug. 
1st Tues., Feb., June, Oct., Dec. Laws 

of 1915, ch. 21. 

1st Tues. every month. 

3d Tues., Jan., March, June, Oct. 

3d Tues., Feb., May, July, Sept., Nov. 

3d Tues., Apr., Aug., Dec. P. S., ch. 184. 

3d Tues. every month. P. S., ch. 184. 

1st Tues., Jan., May, Sept. 
1st Tues., Feb., June, Oct. 
1st Tues., March, July, Nov. 
1st Tues., Apr., Aug., Dec. Laws of 

1913, ch. 184. 
2d and 4th Tuesdays every month, ex- 
cept August. Laws of 1911, ch. 122. 



every month. 
Feb., Apr., June, 



Aug., 



Oct., 

Tues. 
Tues. 
Tues. 
Tues. 
Tues. 
Tues. 



3d Tues. 
4th Tues. 

Dec. 
On the Fri. next following the 4th 

of Jan., July. 
On the Fri. next following the 4th 

of Feb.. May, Nov. 
On the Fri. next following the 4th 

of March, Sept. 
On the Fri. next following the 4th 

of April, Oct. 
On the Fri. next following the 4th 

of June, Dec. 
On the Fri. next following the 4th 

of Aug. Laws of 1895, ch. 21. 

1st and 3d Fridays every month, except 
July and Aue. ; 1st Fri. July and 3d 
Fri. Aug. P. S.. ch. 184. 

Last Wed., Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., 

Nov. 

Last Wed., Feb., April, June, Aug.. Oct., 
Dec, P. S., ch. 184. 

3d Tues., Jan., April, July, Oct. 

2d Tues.. Feb., May, Nov.; 4th Tues. 
Julv. 

Woodsville 3d Tues., March. June, Sept., Dec. 

Littleton 1st Tues., May, Nov. 

Canaan 1st Tues., June. Laws of 1915, ch. 88. 

1st Tues., Jan., March, May, July, Nov. 

3d Tues., Jan., June. 

4th Tues., Jan.. Aug. 

1st Tues., April, Oct. P. S., ch. 184. 



466 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



JUSTICES AND SPECIAL JUSTICES OF MUNICIPAL 
COURTS. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council. Term, until seventy years of age. 
Const., Part II, Arts. 45 and 77; Laws of 1915, ch. 30. Salaries, Laws 
of 1915, ch. 30, sect. 1; 1915, ch. 60. 



Town or City. 



Allenstown 

Alton 

Ashland 

Berlin 

Boscawen 

Bristol 

Canaan 

Charlestown 

Claremont 

Concord 

Conway 

Derry 

Dover 

Exeter 

Farmington 
Franklin 

Goffstown 

Gorham 




Burt L. Millen J 

Eugene N. Fontaine. . . .S.J 

Frank M. Ayer J 

Asa Warren Drew J 

J. Howard Wight J 

Matthew J. Ryan S.J 

Willis G. Buxton J 

Edward Webster S.J 

Charles W. Fling J 

Ira A. Chase S.J 

Edward A. Barney J 

Frank W. Hamlin J 

Charles S. Hutchins . . . S.J 

William E. Kinney J 

Ira G. Colby S.J 

Allan Chester Clark J 

David F. Dudley S.J 

James L. Gibson J. 

Holmes B. Fifield S.J. 

Herbert L. Grinnell, Jr.. .J 
Edwin B. Weston S.J. 

William F. Nason J 

Albert P. Sherry S.J 

Henry A. Shute J 

Frank A. Batchelder. . . S.J. 

Arthur H. Wiggin J, 

Omar A. Towne J 

Clyde C. Brown S.J. 

Alfred W. Poore J. 

Harry G. Noyes J, 

Elisha H. Cady S.J. 



Date of 
appoint- 
ment. 



Apr. 
Apr. 

Mar. 

May 

Mar. 
Apr. 

Mar. 
Mar. 

Mar. 
Mar. 



13, 1915 
13, 1915 



30. 1915 
26, 1916 



10, 1915 
6, 1915 



30, 1915 
30, 1915 



23, 1915 
23, 1915 



Mar. 30, 1915 



Mar. 

May 



Mar. 
Mar. 



Mar. 
Mar. 



Mar. 

Mar. 



Mar. 
Mar. 



Mar. 
Dec. 



Mar. 
Mar. 



30, 1915 
14, 1915 

10, 1915 
10. 1915 

10. 1915 
16, 1915 

10, 1915 
10, 1915 

10, 1915 
10, 1915 

10, 1915 
29, 1916 

10, 1915 

31, 1916 



Mar. 10, 1915 



Mar. 
Mar. 



10, 1915 
10, 1915 



Mar. 10, 1915 



Mar. 
Mar. 



10, 1915 
10, 1915 



Limi- 
tation by 
age. 



July 13, 

Jan. 7, 

Aug. 25, 

Nov. 2, 

Mar. 11, 

Sep. 24, 

Aug. 22, 

Oct. 18, 

Aug. 27, 

Mar. 25, 



1935 
1958 



1943 
1922 



1936 
1952 



1936 
1930 



1926 
1924 



July 22, 1951 



June 14, 
Sept. 8, 

Apr. 3, 
Jan. 11, 

July 4, 
Oct. 17, 

Dec. 2, 
Dec. 22, 

Jan. 29, 
Mar. 15, 



1933 
1940 



1945 
1942 



1947 
1927 



1925 
1925 



1951 
1941 



Nov. 22, 1927 



Nov. 17, 
Sep. 12, 



1926 
1947 



Nov. 30, 1935 



Feb. 
May 



1921 
1952 



Dec. 15, 1950 



June 15, 
Aug. 30, 



1944 
1935 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



467 



JUSTICES AND SPECIAL JUSTICES OF MUNICIPAL 
COURTS. — Continued. 



Town or City. 



Hampton 

Hanover 

Haverhill 

Hillsborough . . 

Jaffrey 

Keene 

Laconia 

Lancaster 

Lebanon 

Lincoln 

Lisbon 

Littleton 

Manchester . . . 

Meredith 

Milford 

Nashua 

Newmarket . . . 
Newport 

Northumberland 

Ossipee 



Name. 



Abbott L. Joplin J. 

Charles Francis Adams, S.J. 

Harry E. Burton. ...... .J. 

William R. Gray S.J. 

Dexter D. Dow J. 

Russell T. Bartlett S.J. 

Samuel W. Holman J. 

Charles L. Rich J. 

Lewis W. Holmes J. 

Charles A. Madden. ... S.J. 

Oscar L. Young J. 

Frederick W. Fowler. . .S.J. 

Fred C. Cleaveland J. 

Fred A. Jones J. 

Rowland B. Jacobs .... S.J. 

Willard C. Fogg J. 

Levi G. Burnell S.J. 

George W. Pike J. 

Fred E. Thorpe S.J. 

Harry L. Heald J. 

Orren W. Hunkins S.J. 

Charles A. Perkins J. 

Arthur S. Healy S.J. 

Bradbury R. Dearborn. . .J. 
Daniel E. Eaton S.J. 

Benjamin F. Prescott. . . . J. 
George A. Worcester. . .S.J. 

Frank B. Clancy J. 

John F. Brown J. 

Bernard W. Carey J. 

William H. Nourse S.J. 

Arthur C. Aldrich J 

Stetson W. Cushing. . . S.J 

Charles S. Miles J 

Charles E. Smart S.J 



Date of 
appoint- 
ment. 


I 
tat 

Feb. 
July 


jimi- 
ton by 

age. 


Apr. 
May 


30, 1915 
28, 1915 


18, 1918 
10, 1936 


Mar. 
Mar. 


10, 1915 
10, 1915 


May 
Sep. 


29, 1938 
27, 1949 


Mar. 
Mar. 


10, 1915 
10, 1915 


Jan. 
May 


20, 1933 
8, 1937 


Mar. 


10, 1915 


June 


5, 1925 


May 


28, 1915 


Mar. 


9, 1923 


Mar. 
Mar. 


10, 1915 
10, 1915 


Apr. 
Feb. 


25, 1918 
4, 1951 


Mar. 
Mar. 


10, 1915 
10, 1915 


Sept. 
Oct. 


11, 1944 
10, 1929 


Mar. 


10, 1915 


Oct. 


24, 1942 


Mar. 
Mar. 


10, 1915 
10, 1915 


Apr. 
Oct. 


9, 1954 
11, 1939 


Jan. 
Jan. 


28, 1916 
28, 1916 


Mar. 
Apr. 


4, 1936 
29, 1925 


Apr. 
Dec. 


28, 1916 
1, 1916 


Aug. 


19, 1952 


Mar. 
Mar. 


10. 1915 
10, 1915 


Aug. 
Oct. 


2, 1938 

3, 1929 


Mar. 
Mar. 


10, 1915 
10, 1915 


Apr. 
Sept 


24, 1942 
1, 1952 


Mar. 
Mar. 


23, 1915 
23, 1915 


Apr. 
June 


2, 1925 
18, 1929 


Mar. 
Mar. 


10, 1915 
10, 1915 


June 
June 


16, 1949 
5, 1922 


Feb. 


25, 1916 


June 


20, 1948 


May 


14, 1915 


Sept 


4, 1961 


Mar. 
Nov. 


10, 1915 
23, 1916 


Mar. 
Apr. 


13, 1956 
20, 1937 


Mar. 
Mar. 


10, 1915 
10, 1915 


Mar. 
Aug. 


19, 1958 
24, 1936 


Mar 
Mar 


23, 1915 
23, 1915 


Dec. 

Aug. 


12, 1922 
17, 1950 



468 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



JUSTICES AND SPECIAL JUSTICES OF MUNICIPAL 
COURTS. — Concluded. 



Town or City. 


Name. 


Date of 
appoint- 
ment. 


Limi- 
tation by 
age. 


Pembroke 


Almon P. Burbank . . . 
Henry P. Cofran 


...J. 
.S.J. 


Mar. 
Mar. 


10, 1915 
10, 1915 


Oct. 17, 1927 
July 6, 1941 


Peterborough . . . 


James B. Sweeney... 
Eben W. Jones 


...J. 
.S.J. 


Mar. 
May 


10, 1915 
26, 1916 


Feb. 4, 1957 
July 21, 1924 


Pittsfield 


Frank S. Jenkins .... 
George H. Colbath. . . . 


...J. 
.S.J. 


Mar. 
Mar. 


30, 1915 
30, 1915 


Oct. 24, 1917 
May 9, 1935 


Plaistow 


John H. Noyes 

Joseph S. Hills 


. . .J. 
.S.J. 


Aug. 
Sep. 


30, 1915 
17, 1915 


Nov. 19, 1924 
Feb. 16, 1938 


Plymouth 


Walter M. Flint 

William A. Kimball . . . 


. . .J. 
.S.J. 


Mar. 
Mar. 


10, 1915 
10, 1915 


June 15, 1947 
July 14, 1946 


Portsmouth .... 


Ernest L. Guptill .... 
Edward H. Adams .... 


. . .J. 
.S.J. 


May 
May 


28, 1915 
28, 1915 


Mar. 9, 1936 
Nov. 25, 1935 


Rindge 


Ned Thrasher 


...J. 


Mar. 


23, 1915 


Jan. 20, 1925 




Samuel D. Felker. . . . 


. . .J. 


July 

May 
June 


21, 1915 

26, 1916 
20, 1916 


Apr. 16, 1929 


Rumney 


Edward A. Elliott 

George P. Loveland . . . 


. . .J. 

• S.J. 


June 24, 1935 
Mar. 29, 1936 




Lester Wallace Hall. . 
Chester T. Woodbury. 


. . .J. 

.S.J. 


Mar. 
Mar. 


16, 1915 
16, 1915 


Sept. 7, 1944 




Jan. 6, 1955 


Somersworth . . . 


Sidney F. Stevens . . . 


...J. 


Mar. 


10, 1915 


Jan. 26, 1948 


Stratford 


John C. Pattee 


...J. 


Mar. 


30, 1915 


Nov. 30, 1918 


Troy 


Harry S. Platts 


. . .J. 


Apr. 


13, 1915 


Sept. 17, 1946 


Walpole 


Ira W. Ramsey 

Maurice E. Costin.... 


. . .J. 

.S.J. 


Nov. 
Nov. 


26, 1915 
26, 1915 


May 22, 1922 
Jan. 29, 1958 


Whitefield 


Edgar M. Bowker. . . . 
Frank B. Lewis 


. . .J. 

.S.J. 


Mar. 
Mar. 


23, 1915 
23, 1915 


Apr. 18, 1946 
Aug. 30, 1931 


Wilton 


Harold D. Cheever. . . 
Richard M. Moore... 


. . .J. 

.S.J. 


Jan. 
Mar. 


2, 1917 
30, 1915 


Aug! 'l'6, 1920 


Winchester .... 


Alexander F. Peirce . . 


...J. 


Mar. 


10, 1915 


Sept. 2, 1933 


Wolfeboro 


Ernest H. Trickey. . . 


. . .J. 


Mar. 


10, 1915 


Sept. 27, 1956 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



469 



TRIAL JUSTICES. 

stices of the Peace designated by the Governor and Council. 
1915, ch. 30, sect. 4. (Not commissioned.) 



Laws of 



Istead . . 
mnington 
tzwilliam 
arrisville 
insdale . 
ooksett . 
errimack 
ilton . . . 
mdwich . 
inapee . . 



Henry C. Metcalf. . . 
Henry W. Wilson. . . 
Henry C. Tenney. . . 
Thomas J. Winn. . . . 
William G. Booth. . . 
George Keating 
Walter E. Kittredge 
Forrest L. Marsh . . . 

Charles B. Hoyt 

Albert D. Pelch. . . . 



April 


21, 


1915 


March 


16, 


1915 


March 


17, 


1915 


July 


16, 


1915 


March 


30, 


1915 


April 


6, 


1915 


April 


13, 


1915 


April 


30, 


1915 


Sept. 


12, 


1916 


March 


17, 


1915 



COMMISSIONERS OF DEEDS. 

unmissioners resident without the state, authorized to acknowledge deeds 
and to take depositions to be used in this state- Appointments are 
made by the Governor and Council for the term of five years. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Date of 
appointment. 



mes D. Bell 



Florida. 

St. Petersburg Feb. 9, 1915 

Maine. 

>orge D. Emery Lebanon Jan. 29, 1913 

Maryland. 



larles Henrv Hesse 217 E. Eager St., Baltimore May 29, 1912 

lliam E. Schul 201 % St. Paul St., Balti- Dec. 29, 1916 

more 



470 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 
Massachusetts. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Date of 
appointment. 



Charles H. Adams 222 State St., Boston 

Sidney W. Armstrong Winchendon 

Horace S. Bacon 107 Stevens St.. Lowell... 

Charles H. Bartlett 60 Pemberton Sq., Boston. 

Blanche I. Brack ett 236 Old So. Bldg., Boston. 

William P. Fowler Room 726, 18 Tremont St., 

Boston 

Warren W. Pox Lowell 

Prank W. Herrick 89 State St., Boston 

Thomas D. Luce, Jr 15 Congress St., Boston... 

Fred H. Nichols Lynn 

Philip T. Nickerson 56 Hanover St., Boston . . . 

Elliott H. Peabody 340 Main St., Worcester. . . 

Elias Saklad 405 Carney Bldg., 43 Tre- 
mont St., Boston 

M. Perry Sargent Amesbury 

Frank B. Spalter Winchendon 

Edward O. Woodward.... 16 No. Station, Boston.... 

New York. 

Ella F. Braman Ill Broadway, N. T. City. . 

Joseph B. Braman Ill Broadway, N. Y. City. . 

Edwin F. Corey 60 Wall St., N. Y. City. . . 

George H. Corey 59 Wall St., N. Y. City... 

William F. Lett 335 Broadway, N. Y. City. . 

Pennsylvania. 

Frederick C. Eberhardt ... . 522-9 Girard Bldg., Phila- 
delphia Feb. 25, 1916 

Thomas J. Hunt Philadelphia April 30, 1913 

John S. Wurts Philadelphia May 15, 1912 

Rhode Island. 



Nov. 


15, 


1912 


Dec. 


12, 


1913 


Nov. 


13, 


1914 


Feb. 


23, 


1915 


Dec. 


30, 


1914 


July 


29, 


1915 


May 


29, 


1913 


Mar. 


13, 


1914 


Sept. 


10, 


1915 


Aug. 


13, 


1915 


May 


22, 


1914 


May 


22, 


1914 


April 


28, 


1916 


Jan. 


28, 


1916 


June 


30, 


1916 


July 


9, 


1913 


Sept. 


22, 


1913 


Feb. 


26, 


1913 


Nov. 


25, 


1913 


Jan. 


29, 


1913 


Feb. 


26, 


1913 



Edwin C. Potter 27 Westminster St., Provi- 
dence 

Vermont. 

David A. Pingree Hartford 

District of Columbia. 



Dec. 29, 1916 



Jan. 16, 1912 



Chauncey Hackett Washington 

Isaac R. Hitt 1410 H St., N. W.. Wash- 
ington 

Anson S. Taylor 1413 H St., N. W., Wash- 
ington 



Great Britain and Ireland. 

Thos. Cato Worsfold 9 Staple Inn, W. C, Lon- 
don, England 



April 17, 1913 

Feb. 16, 1912 

Oct. 27, 1916 

Nov. 26, 1915 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 471 

NATIONAL GUARD ROSTER, 1917. 

Date of 
Name and Residence. Commission. 

Commander-in-Chief 

'enry W. Keyes, Haverhill, Governor January 4, 1917 

Staff. 

[ajor Oscar P. Cole, Berlin January 4, 1917 

Iajor John G. W. Knowlton, Exeter January 4, 1917 

Iajor Eugene W. Leach, Concord January 4, 1917 

[ajor Raymond U. Smith, Haverhill January 4, 1917 

Iajor Fernando W. Hartford, Portsmouth, January 4, 1917 

Iajor Arthur E. Moreau, Manchester January 4, 1917 

Iajor Philip C. Lockwood, Manchester January 4, 1917 

deut. Paul Hurlburt, Rochester January 4, 1917 

Adjutant-General. 

rig.-Gen. Charles W. Howard, Nashua May 1, 1915 

Inspector-General. 

rig.-Gen. William Sullivan, Manchester, Brevet Maj. Gen. 

January 3, 1907 

Judge Advocate-General. 

laj. Eugene W. Leach, Concord „ March 26, 1907 

The Quartermaster Corps. 

Quartermaster-General. 

The Adjutant-General, ex-officio, Acting Quartermaster-General. 

Quartermasters. 

AJ. E. RAY SHAW, Nashua Dec. 4, 1906 

APT. REGINALD C. STEVENSON, Exeter Dec. 28, 1910 

APT. OSCAR G. LAGERQUIST, Manchester July 12, 1916 

The Medical Department. 

[AJ. RUSSELL WILKTNS, Concord (Attached 1st Inf.) Jan. 30, 1911 

APT. BERTELL L. TALBOT, Milford (Aattached 1st Inf.), July 1, 1916 
APT. DAVID W. PARKER, Manchester (Attached Field 

Artillery) Dec. 11, 1912 

APT. CHARLES S. WALKER, Keene (Attached 1st Inf.). .May 8, 1914 

APT. HENRY S. BECKFORD, Laconia (Attached 1st Inf.). May 29, 1916 



472 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Field Hospital. 

MAJ. JOHN G. W. KNOWLTON, Exeter June 24, 1916 

CAPT. JAMES J. POWERS, Manchester June 24, 1916 

CAPT. TAPPAN C. PULSIFER, Berlin Aug. 1, 1916 

1ST LIEUT. JOSEPH R. HELFF, Keene June 27, 1916 

1ST LIEUT. PERSONS W. WING, Canaan July 3, 1916 

1ST LIEUT. JOHN A. ROGERS, Nashua July 13, 1916 

Civilian Examining Surgeons. 

J. LEAVITT CAIN, M. D., Newport. 

W. O. JUNKINS, M. D., Portsmouth. 

J. L. SWEENEY, M. D., Dover. 

JAMES B. WOODMAN, M. D., Franklin. 

ALBERT F. MULVANITY, M. D., Nashua. 

T. J. MORRISON, M. D., Somersworth. 

F. G. WARNER, M. D., Peterborough. 

The Ordnance Department. 

Chief of Ordnance. 

The Adjutant-General, ex-officio, Acting Chief of Ordnance. 

Ordnance Officer. 

MAJ. ARTHUR F. CUMMINGS, Nashua Mar. 14, 1904 

Note — Ordnance officer detailed inspector of small-arms practice. 

U. S. Army Officers on Duty with New Hampshire National 
Guard as Inspector-Instructors. 

MAJ. JAMES F. HALL, Medical Corps, U. S. A. 

CAPT. THOMAS A. ROBERTS, Cavalry, U. S. A. 

CAPT. GEORGE W. STUART, Infantry, U. S. A. 

CAPT. CHARLES D. WINN, Coast Artillery Corps, U. S. A. 

CAPT. JOHN A. BROCKMAN, Signal Corps, U. S. A. 

Company A, Signal Corps. 

Station, Milford. 



CAPT. CLINTON A. McLANE, Milford July 19, 1916 

1ST LIEUT. GEORGE S. WILSON, Milford July 19, 1916 

1ST LIEUT. HAROLD C. GAULT, Milford July 19, 1916 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



473 



First Regiment Infantry. 

Headquarters, Manchester. 

onel — Michael J. Healy, Manchester Sept. 17, 1915 

mtenant-Colonel — William E. Sullivan, Nashua Sept. 17 1^15 

jors — 

)scar P. Cole, Berlin April 27, 1909 

Eugene T. Sherburne, Manchester Nov. 29, 1913 

)rville E. Cain, Keene Oct. 8, 1915 

atain, Regimental Adjutant — George P. Elliot, Manchester 

(Commanding Headquarters Company) Oct. 8, 1915 

ptain, Regimental Quartermaster — Neil Loynachan, Man- 
chester (Commanding Supply Company) Oct. 8, 1915 

ptain, Assistant Inspector of Small Arms Practice — Alonzo 

L. McKinley, Nashua Sept. 22, 1915 

st Lieutenants, Battalion Adjutants — 

Peter C. Johnson, Concord May 13, 1913 

larry A. Shaw, Manchester Dec. 10, 1915 

Crnest C. Barker, Keene Dec. 17, 1915 

ond Lieutenant, Supply Company — Joseph P. Lee, Nashua, Dec. 10, 1915 

iplain — William H. Sweeney, Lakeport Oct. 8, 1915 

HEADQUARTERS COMPANY. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Station. 


Date of 
rank. 


rge P. Elliot 




Manchester. . 


Oct. 8, 1915 







SUPPLY COMPANY. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Station. 


Date of 
rank. 


1 Loynachan 

;ph P. Lee 




Manchester. . 
Nashua 


Oct. 8, 1915 


2d Lieut 


Dec. 10, 1915 



MACHINE GUN COMPANY. 



Name. 



>rge W. Morrill . . . 

oy H. Morey 

arles S. Hinds .... 
arles S. Costigan . 



Rank. 



Captain . 
1st Lieut. 
2d Lieut.. 
2d Lieut.. 



Station. 



Concord . . 
Franklin . 
Franklin . 
Manchester. 



Date of 
rank. 



May 13, 1913 
July 1. 1916 
July 1, 1916 
July 21, 1916 



474 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



FIRST BATTALION. 



Headquarters, Manchester; Major Eugene T. Sherburne, 
1st Lieut. Harry A. Shaw, Adjutant. 



Commanding ; 



Co. 


Name. 


Rank. 


Station. 


Date of 
rank. 


"A" 


Sylvio Leclerc 

Aimee Genard 

William H. Jutras . . . 


Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut. . . 


Manchester. . 
Manchester. . 
Manchester. . 


Mar. 7, 1911 
Dec. 10, 1915 
July 1, 1916 


"B" 


Patrick A. Casey 

Peter Flynn 

William O'Neill 


Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut . . . 


Manchester. . 
Manchester. . 

Manchester. . 


Mar. 13, 1914 
July 1, 1916 
July 1, 1916 


"F" 


Harold W. Hickman . . 
Matthew W. Main .... 
George I. Nye 


Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut . . . 


Manchester. . 
Manchester. . 
Manchester. . 


Jan. 28, 1914 
Jan. 28, 1914 
Jan. 28, 1914 


"K" 


Patrick J. Lynch 

Thomas J. Quirk 

William J. Sayers .... 


Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut . . . 


Manchester. . 
Manchester. . 
Manchester. . 


Jan. 12, 1915 
Jan. 12, 1915 
Mar. 8, 1916 



SECOND BATTALION. 



Headquarters, Keene ; 



Major Orville E. Cain, Commanding; 1st Lieut. 
Ernest C. Barker, Adjutant. 



Co. 


Name. 


Rank. 


Station. 


Date of 
rank. 


"D" 


Nelson Gendron 

Alfred F. Gravelle. . . 
William D. Lawrence 


Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut . . . 


Nashua 

Nashua 

Nashu'a 


Jan. 5, 1916 
Jan. 5, 1916 
Jan. 5, 1916 


"G" 


Arthur P. O'Leary. . . 
Edward E. Carroll... 
Bernard J. Gilbo 


Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut . . . 


Keene 

Keene 

Keene 


Mar. 8, 1916 
Mar. 8. 1916 
Mar. 8, 1916 


"H" 


Walter C. Ellis 

William H. Burnett . . 
Clarence C. Twitchell 


Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut... 


Keene 

Keene. ..... 

Keene 


Dec. 17, 1915 
Dec. 23, 1915 
July 1, 1916 


"I" 


Wilkie I. Elliott 

William H. Harwood 
Harry D. Emerson. . . 


Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut... 


Nashua 

Nashua 

Nashua 


Mar. 2, 1910 
Sep. 29, 1911 
July 6, 1916 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



475 



THIRD BATTALION. 

iquarters, Berlin; Major Oscar P. Cole, Commanding; 1st Lieut. Peter 
C. Johnson, Adjutant. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Station. 


Date of 
rank. 


' George A. Knee 

Jerry E. Cochran.... 
John F. Carr 

' Herbert H. Rouse... 

Arthur J. Coyle 

Robert F. Keane, Jr.. 

' Burritt H. Hinman . . . 

Mark T. Wight 

Paul Hurlburt 

' Samuel H. Edes 

John C. Taylor. 

Charles F. Bowen .... 


Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut . . . 

Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut... 

Captain 

1st. Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut. . . 

Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut. . . 


Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Manchester. . 
Concord. .... 
Concord. .... 

Berlin 

Berlin 

Berlin 

Newport. . . . 
Manchester. . 
Manchester. . 


Dec. 17, 1915 
Dec. 17, 1915 
Dec. 17, 1915 

July 29, 1912 
Mar. 8, 1916 
May 11, 1916 

Mar. 18, 1915 
May 29, 1912 
Oct. 1, 1916 

Feb. 14, 1911 
July 1, 1916 
July 21, 1916 



COAST ARTILLERY CORPS 

ajor Chauncey B. Hoyt, commanding, Portsmouth, November 11, 1909. 

Capt. Horace W. Locklin, Eng. Officer, Portsmouth, May 6, 1916. 

1st Lieut. Arthur L. Smith, Adjutant, Portsmouth, May 6, 1916. 
I Lieut. Charles C. Crowley, Quartermaster and Commissary, Dover, 
August 18, 1914. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Station. 


Date of 
rank. 


" Clarence P. Bodwell. 
William H. Naylor. . 
George W. Coram .... 

' George R. Bowman . . 

Harry E. Gove 

Joseph H. Lavertue . . 

Alvin E. Foss 

John H. Dudley 

Charles F. Blake. . . . 

i" Joseph Connell 

Edgar A. Davis 

Edward M. Cassily. . 


Captain ..... 
1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut... 

Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut . . . 

Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut . . . 

Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut. . . 


Portsmouth. . 
Portsmouth. . 
Portsmouth.. 

Laconia 

Laconia 

Laconia 

Exeter 

Exeter 

Exeter. ..... 

Dover 

Dover 

Dover 


May 13, 1915 
May 13, 1915 
May 13, 1915 

May 5, 1916 
May 31, 1916 
May 31, 1916 

Oct. 12, 1907 
June 28, 1912 
June 28, 1912 

Aug. 22, 1914 
Feb. 16, 1912 
May 13, 1915 



476 



NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 



CAVALRY. 

Station, Peterborough; Troop "A' 



Name. 


Rank. 


Station. 


Date of 
rank. 


Harry F. Smith 

John P. McQuillan 

Daniel P. Mahoney 


Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut . . . 


Peterborough 
Peterborough 
Peterborough 


July 1, 1916 
July 1, 1916 
July 1, 1916 



FIELD ARTILLERY. 

Station, Manchester; Battery "A". 



Name. 


Rank. 


Station. 


Date of 

rank. 


Edwin L. Towle 

Frank J. Abbott 

Lucius E. Hill 

Walter B. Smith 

Harry G. Hall 


Captain 

1st Lieut. . . 
1st Lieut. . . 
2d Lieut... 
2d Lieut . . . 


Manchester. . 
Manchester. . 
Manchester. . 
Manchester. . 
Manchester. . 


June 2, 1910 
June 2, 1910 
Dec. 30, 1915 
Dec. 30, 1915 
Dec. 30, 1915 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Relative Bank of Officers. 



477 



Name and rank. 



Brigadier-Generals. 

ward, Charles W. . . 
llivan, William 

Colonel. 

aly, Michael J 

Lieutenant-C olonel. 
llivan, William E. . . . 

Majors. 

mmings, Arthur F. . 

aw, E. Ray 

ach, Eugene W 

le, Oscar P 

yt. Chauncey B. . . . 

lkins, Russell 

erburne, Eugene T. 

in, Orville E 

owlton, John G. W. 

Captains. 

ss, Alvin E 

ott, Wilkie I 

wle, Edwin L 

venson, Reginald C. 

es, Samuel H 

;]erc, Sylvio 

use, Herbert H. . . . 

rker, David W 

rrill, George W. . . . 
kraan, Harold W. . 

ey, Patrick A 

bot, Bertell L.*. . . 
Iker, Charles S. . . . 

inell, Joseph 

ch, Patrick J 

iman, Burritt H. . . 
Iwell, Clarence P.. 
Kinley, Alonzo L.. 

iot, George P 

nachan, Neil 

eeney, William H.. 

is, Walter C 

ee, George A ,. 

ldron, Nelson .... 
jeary, Arthur P. . . 
vman, George R. . . 
klin, Horace W.. . 



Date of 
commission. 



May 
Jan. 



1, 1915 
3, 1907 



Sept. 17, 1915 



Sept. 17, 1915 



March 14, 1904 
Dec. 4, 1906 

March 26, 1907 
April 27, 1909 
11, 1909 
30, 1911 
29, 1913 
8, 1915 
24, 1916 



Nov. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
June 



Corps or Regiment. 



Oct. 


12, 


1907 


March 


2, 


1910 


June 


2, 


1910 


Dec. 


28, 


1910 


Feb. 


14, 


1911 


March 


7, 


1911 


July 


29, 


1912 


Dec. 


11, 


1912 


May 


13, 


1913 


Jan. 


28, 


1914 


March 


13 


1914 


July 


1, 


1916 


May 


8, 


1914 


Aug. 


22, 


1914 


Jan. 


12, 


1915 


March 


18, 


1915 


May 


13, 


1915 


Sept. 


22, 


1915 


Oct. 


8, 


1915 


Oct. 


8, 


1915 


Oct. 


8, 


1915 


Dec. 


17, 


1915 


Dec. 


17, 


1915 


Jan. 


5, 


1916 


March 


8, 


1916 


May 


5, 


1916 


May 


6, 


1916 



The Adjt.-Gen., Chief of Staff 
The Inspector-General 



First Infantry 



First Infantry 



Ordnance Dept. 
Quartermaster Corps 
Judge-Advocate's Dept. 
First Infantry 
Coast Artillery Corps 
Medical Dept. 
First Infantry 
First Infantry 
Medical Dept. 



Coast Artillery Corps 
First Infantry 
Field Artillery 
Quartermaster Corps 
First Infantry 
First Infantry 
First Infantry 
Medical Dept. 
First Infantry 
First Infantry 
First Infantry 
Medical Dept. 
Medical Dept. 
Coast Artillery Corps 
First Infantry 
First Infantry 
Coast Artillery Corps 
First Infantry 
First Infantry 
First Infantry 
First Infantry 
First Infantry 
First Infantry 
First Infantry 
First Infantry 
Coast Artillery Corps 
Coast Artillery Corps 



educed from major at own request. 



478 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Relative Bank of Officers. — Continued. 



No. 



28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 



Name and rank, 



Captains. 

Beckford, Henry S 

Powers. James J 

Smith, Harry P 

Lagerquist, Oscar G 

McLane. Clinton A 

Pulsif er, Tappan C. . . . . . 

First Lieutenants. 

Abbott, Frank J 

Harwood, William H 

Davis, Edgar A 

Wight, Mark T 

Dudley, John H 

Johnson, Peter C 

Main, Matthew W 

Quirk, Thomas J 

Naylor, William H 

Shaw, Harry A 

Genard, Aimee 

Cochran, Jerry E 

Barker, Ernest C 

Burnett. William H 

Hill, Lucius E 

Gravelle, Alfred F 

Coyle, Arthur J 

Carroll, Edward E 

Smith, Arthur L 

Gove, Harry E 

Helff, Joseph R 

Morey, Leroy H 

Flynn, Peter 

Taylor, John C 

McQuillan, John F 

Wing, Persons W 

Rogers, John A 

Wilson, George S 

Gault, Harold C 

Second Lieutenants. 

Blake. Charles F. . 

Nye, Georgre I 

Crowley, Charles C 

Coram. George W 

Cassily, Edward M 

Lee, Joseph P 

Carr. John F 

Smith, Walter B 

Hall, Harry G 

Lawrence. William D. . . . 

Sayers, William J 

Gilbo, Bernard J 

Keane, Robert F., Jr 



Date of 






commission. 


Corps or Regiment. 


May 


29, 


1916 


Medical Dept. 




June 


24, 


1916 


Medical Dept. 




July 


1, 


1916 


Cavalry 




July 


12, 


1916 


Quartermaster Corps 


July 


19, 


1916 


Signal Corps 




Aug. 


1, 


1916 


Medical Dept. 




June 


2, 


1910 


Field Artillery 




Sept. 


29, 


1911 


First Infantry 




Feb. 


16, 


1912 


Coast Artillery Corps 


May 


29, 


1912 


First Infantry 




June 


28, 


1912 


Coast Artillery Corps 


May 


13, 


1913 


First Infantry 




Jan. 


28, 


1914 


First Infantry 




Jan. 


12, 


1915 


First Infantry 




May 


13, 


1915 


Coast Artillery Corps 


Dec. 


10, 


1915 


First Infantry 




Dec. 


10, 


1915 


First Infantry 




Dec. 


17, 


1915 


First Infantry 




Dec. 


17, 


1915 


First Infantry 




Dec. 


23, 


1915 


First Infantry 




Dec. 


30, 


1915 


Field Artillery 




Jan. 


5, 


1916 


First Infantry 




March 


«, 


1916 


First Infantry 




March 


8, 


1916 


First Infantry 




May 


6, 


1916 


Coast Artillery 


Corps 


May 


31, 


1916 


Coast Artillery 


Corps 


June, 


27, 


1916 


Medical Dept. 




July 


1, 


1916 


First Infantry 




July 


1, 


1916 


First Infantry 




July 


1, 


1916 


First Infantry 




July 


1, 


1916 


Cavalry 




July 


3, 


1916 


Medical Dept. 




July 


13, 


1916 


Medical Dept. 




July 


19, 


1916 


Signal Corps 




July 


19, 


1916 


Signal Corps 




June 


28, 


1912 


Coast Artillery 


Corps 


Jan. 


28, 


1914 


First Infantry 




Aug. 


18, 


1914 


Coast Artillery Corps 


May 


13, 


1915 


Coast Artillery Corps 


May 


13, 


1915 


Coast Artillery Corps 


Dec. 


10, 


1915 


First Infantry 




Dec. 


17, 


1915 


First Infantry 




Dec. 


30, 


1915 


Field Artillery 




Dec. 


30, 


1915 


Field Artillery 




Jan. 


5, 


1916 


First Infantry 




March 


8, 


1916 


First Infantry 




March 


8, 


1916 


First Infantry 




May 


11, 


1916 


First Infantry 





NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



479 



Relative Bank of Officers. — Concluded. 





Date of 




Second Lieutenants. 


commission. 


Corps or Regiment. 


Lavertue, Joseph H 


May 31, 1916 


Coast Artillery Corps 


Mahoney, Daniel P 


July 1, 1916 


Cavalry 


Hinds, Charles S 


July 1, 1916 


First Infantry 


Jutras, William H 


July 1, 1916 


First Infantry 


O'Neill, William 


July 1, 1916 


First Infantry 


Twitchell, Clarence C, . . . 


July 1, 1916 


First Infantry 


Emerson. Harry D 


July 6, 1916 


First Infantry 


Costigan, Charles S 


July 21, 1916 


First Infantry 


Bowen, Charles F 


July 21, 1916 


First Infantry 


Hurlburt, Paul 


Oct. 1, 1916 


First Infantry 



480 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Retired Officers of the New Hampshire National Guard. 



Name. 



Elbert Wheeler 

Eugene M. Keyes ..... 
Frank E. Rollins 

Frank H. Keenan 

Alfred L. Trenoweth. . 

Julius C. Timson 

George M. Follett. . . . 
Augustus D. Ayling. . . 
Silas S. Wallace 

Charles E. Chapman.. 
Charles B. Davis 

Frank A. Burnham . . . 

Guy Pederzani 

Eugene J. Stanton 
Alfred W. Carpenter.. 
Edmund Tetley 

Forrest M. Laraba. . . . 
Joseph M. Clough. . . . 

Joab N. Patterson.... 

George M. L. Lane... 

Edward H. Currier. . . 

Jason E. Tolles 

Henry H. Jewell 

Charles A. Roby 

Robert S. Foss 

R. Emmet Walsh 

James B. Crowley... 

Arthur G. Shattuck . . 

Treffle Raiche 

Edward A. G. Smith. 
Fred A. Foster 

William B. Lang. . . . 
Charles L. Mason. . . . 

Walter G. Fuller 

Joseph G. Jones 

William H. Garvin . . 

John C. McGilvray . . . 




Residence. 



Brigadier-General, 

Inspector-General . . . 
Major 1st Infantry. . . . 
Major 2d Infantry, 
Lieut. -Col. by brevet. 

Major 2d Infantry 

1st Lieut. 2d Infantry. . 
Lieut. -Col. 2d Infantry. 
Major and Brig. Q. M.. 
Major-Gen., Adjt.-Gen.. 
Captain of Battery, 

Major by brevet 

1st Lieut. Field Artillery 
Captain Cavalry, 

Major by brevet 

Captain 1st Infantry. . 
2d Lieut. 1st Infantry. . 
Captain 1st Infantry. . . 
1st Lieut. 2d Infantry. 
Colonel 2d Infantry, 

Brig. -Gen. by brevet. 
2d Lieut. 1st Infantry. . 
Brig.-G., ex-Brig. Comdr. 
Maj.-Gen. by brevet. . 
Brig. G., ex-Brig. Comdr. 
Maj.-Gen. by brevet. . 
Brig.-G., ex-Brig. Comdr. 
Maj.-Gen. by brevet. . 
Lieut. -Col. ex-Med. Di- 
rector, Col. by brevet 
Brit?. -Gen., Brig. -Comdr., 
Maj.-Gen. by brevet. . 
Maj., Surg.. Med. Dept. 
Maj., Sub. Dept., 

Lieut. -Col. by brevet 

Capt. Ord. Dept 

Lieut., Aide to Brig. 

Comdr 

Lieut., Aide to Brig. 

Comdr 

Col. 1st Infantry. 

Brig. -Gen. by brevet. 
Lieut. Col. 1st Infantry, 

Col. by brevet 

Major 1st Infantry.... 
Lieut., Batt'l Q. M. and 
Com. 1st Infantry . . . 
Lieut., 1st Infantry. . . . 
Lieut.-Col. 2d Infantry 
Cap. Com. 2d Infantry. . 
Lieut., Batt'l Adjt. 2d 

Infantry 

Band, 2d Infantry. 

2d Lieut, by brevet. . 
Band 2d Infantry, 

2d Lieut, by brevet. . 



Nashua 

Keene 

Dover 

Dover 

Concord 

Claremont 

Willimantic, Ct. . 
Centreville, Mass. 

Lebanon 

Manchester 

Peterborough . . . 

Milford 

Nashua 

Nashua 

Concord 

Laconia 

Manchester 

New London 

Concord 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Nashua 

Nashua 

Nashua 

Laconia 

Manchester 

Nashua 

Nashua 

Manchester . . . 
Manchester . . . 

Manchester . . . 
Manchester . . . 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 481 

letired Officers of the New Hampshire National Guard. — Continued. 









Date of 


Name. 


Rank. 


Residence. 


retirement. 


hur F. Nevers 


Band, 2d Infantry, 








2d Lieut, by brevet. . 


Concord 


Apr. 27, 1909 


;ar G. Pelkey 


Band, 2d Infantry, 








2d Lieut, by brevet. . 


Concord 


Apr. 27, 1909 


in D. Chapman 


Priv. 1st Infantry, 








2d Lieut, by brevet. . 


Keene 


Dec. 8, 1909 


ink W. Brown 


Capt. 1st Infantry 


Concord 


Dec. 27, 1909 


,hur H. Knowlton.. 


Maj., Insp.-Gen., 








Lieut., Col. by brevet 


Concord 


Dec. 28, 1909 


irles K. Nichols. . . . 


Sergt., Cavalry, 








2d Lieut, by brevet. . 


Peterborough . . . 


Jan. 25, 1910 


vin S. Brown 


Priv. Cavalry, 








2d Lieut, by brevet. . 


Bennington .... 


Feb. 7, 1910 


jrge R. Leavitt 


Maj. and 








Asst. Insp. Gen 


Lexington, Mass. 


Apr. 29, 1910 


rhert J. Marsh 


Priv. Artillery. 








2d Lieut, by brevet. . 


Manchester .... 


Apr. 29, 1910 


yy A. Hayes 


1st Lieut. Artillery. . . . 


Manchester .... 


May 2, 1910 


)in Gustaf son 


Capt. Artillery 


Manchester .... 


June 2, 1910 


in E. Hall 


1st Lieut. Artillery.... 


Manchester .... 


Oct. 11, 1910 


rry B. Cilley 


Maj. -Gen., 








The Adjutant-General 


Manchester .... 


Jan. 5, 1911 


nk Giguere 


Capt. 1st Infantry 


Manchester .... 


Mar. 8, 1911 


hur E. Tinkham. . . . 


1st Lieut. 1st Infantry. 


Manchester .... 


Mar. 20, 1911 


irles H. Dutton 


Capt. Cavalry, 








Major by brevet 


Hancock 


Apr. 15, 1911 


n T. Robertson 


2d Lieut, by brevet, 








Cavalry 


Peterborough . . . 


Apr. 21, 1911 


ert W. Spaulding. . . 


Capt. of Infantry 


Concord 


May 15, 1911 


>hael Clougherty. . . . 


Capt. of Infantry 


Manchester .... 


Dec. 10, 1911 


phen E. Hall 


Capt. of Infantry 


Concord 


Dec. 10, 1911 


nk E. Russ 


1st Lieut., 








Coast Artillery Corps 
1st Lieut. Infantry. . . . 




Dec 25 1911 


rles P. Barnnm. . . . 


Springfield, Mass. 


Jan. 8, 1912 


n E. Cuddy 


Capt. and Comsy., 








1st Infantrv 


Manchester .... 


June 10, 1912 




2d Lieut. 1st Infantry. . 
1st Lieut. Cavalry, .... 




Nov 11 1912 


rles L. Rich 


Peterborough . . . 


Nov. 14, 1912 


rles W. Jellison .... 


Capt. Cavalrv 


Peterborough . . . 


Dec. 31, 1912 


rles H. Colby 


Capt. 1st Infantry 


Concord 


Feb. 6, 1913 


rge F. Diamond .... 


Sergt. Cavalry, 








2d Lieut, by brevet. . 


Peterborough . . . 


Mar. 7, 1913 


n Vannevar 


Capt. and Chaplain, 


Swampscott, 






1st Infantry 


Mass 


May 7, 1913 


1 F. Babbidge 

n. P. Flanagan 


Brigadier-General 

Capt. and Quartermas- 




Nov 29 1913 








ter, 1st Infantry. . . . 
Private of Cavalry, 




Dec 16 1913 


)s A. Martin 








2d Lieut, by brevet. . 


Peterborough . . . 


Dec. 17, 1913 


rge W. Preston. . . . 


Private of Cavalry, 








2d Lieut, by brevet. . 


Peterborough . . . 


Dec. 17. 1913 


lerick W. Moore... 


Captain Coast Artillery 








Corps 


Laconia 


Jan. 9, 1914 


•ard J. Kelley 


Captain 1st Infantry... 


Manchester .... 


Mar. 13, 1914 


5 L. Piper 


Major, Q. M. Corps. . . . 


Laconia 


Apr. 27, 1914 


rice H. Nichols. . . . 


2d Lieutenant, Cavalry. 


Peterborough . . . 


Sept. 9, 1914 



482 NEW HAMPSHIEE MANUAL. 

Retired Officers of the New Hampshire National Guard. — Concluded. 









Date of 


Name. 


Rank. 


Residence. 


retirement. 


Edward A. Coburn 


Private of Cavalry, 










2d Lieut, by brevet. . 


Peterborough . . . 


Oct. 


2, 1914 


John E. Harmon 


Private of Cavalry, 










2d Lieut, by brevet. . 


Peterborough . . . 


Oct. 


2, 19L 


Thomas J. Conway 


1st Lieut., 1st Infantry 


Manchester .... 


Oct. 


2, 19L 


Anthony J. Foye 


Captain, 1st Infantry. . . 


Manchester .... 


Dec. 


16, 191' 


James P. Morse 


2d Lieut., 1st Infantry. 
Brig. -Gen., 




Feb. 


4, 191£ 


Herbert E. Tutherly. . . 








The Adjutant-General 


Claremont 


May 


1, 191E 


Amos 0. Harrington... 


2d Lieut., Cavalry 


Peterborough . . . 


May 


3, 191£ 


Ubaid Hebert 


Captain, 1st Infantry. . 


Manchester .... 


June 


23, 191£ 


Michael H. Degnan .... 


Captain, 1st Infantry. . 


White River 










Jet., Vt 


Sept. 


15, 19L C 


Frank H. Fowier 


Captain, 1st Infantry. . 


Concord 


Nov. 


2, 191E 


Jacob Conn 


Captain, 1st Infantry . . 


Concord 


Nov. 


12, 191f 


Henry A. Worthen. . . . 


1st Lieut., Field Artillery 


Manchester .... 


Dec. 


3, 191J 


G-eorge W. Upton 


2d Lieut., Field Artillery 


Manchester .... 


Dec. 


3, 191J 


Martin 0. Quinn 


2d Lieut., 1st Infantry. 
Captain, 1st Infantry.. 


Keene 


Dec. 
Dec. 


10, 19L C 


Charles R. Blake 


Nashua 


14, 1911 


Henry L. O'Malley. . . . 


2d Lieut., 1st Infantry. 


Manchester .... 


Jan. 


31, 191( 


Israel H. Washburn. . . . 


Captain, Coast Artillery 












Portsmouth .... 


Apr. 


28, 191' 









Active Officers Brevetted for Continuous Service of Over Fifteen 

Years as Such. 



Name. 
Brig. -Gen. William Sullivan. 



Brevet-rank. 
Major-General 



Date. 
June 25, 190' 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. -183 



MEMBERSHIP AND ORGANIZATION OF THE LEGIS- 
LATURE OF 1917, SHOWING PARTY AFFILIATIONS 
OF MEMBERS. 

Each legislator is classed according to the party upon whose ticket he 
was elected. The symbols used are: 

"r" Republican 

"d" Democrat 

"p" Progressive 

"i. d." Independent Democrat 

"ind." Independent 







D 


i 

1 

i 


n 


|D 


^ 



i 



^m 



yQDODD 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



485 



Senators. 



President, Jesse M. Barton, r., Newport. 



District No. 1 

Daniel J. Daley, d., Berlin 
District No. 2 

Wilbur A. Marshall, d., Colebrook 
District No. 3 

Alfred Stanley, r. and p., Plymouth 
District No. 4 

Nathan O. Weeks, r., Wakefield 
District No. 5 

Joseph B. Perley, r., Enfield 
District No. 6 

Fred S. Roberts, r. and p., Laconia 
District No. 7 

Obe G. Morrison, r., Northfield 
District No. 8 

Jesse M. Barton, r., Newport 
District No". 9 

Stillman H. Baker, r. and p., Hills- 
borough 
District No. 10 

Forrest W. Hall, r., Westmoreland 
District No. 11 

Chas. W. Fletcher, r. and p., Rindge 
District No. 12 

Willis C. Hardy, r., Hollis 



District No. 13 

Marcel Theriault, r. and p., Nashua 
District No. 14 

Fred M. Pettengill, d., Pembroke 
District No. 15 

Nathaniel E. Martin, d., Concord 
District No. 16 

William H. Maxwell, r., Manchester 
District No. 17 

Fred O. Parnell, r., Manchester 
District No. 18 

Michael F. Shea, d., Manchester 
District No. 19 

Cyprien J. Belanger, d., Manchester 
District No. 20 

John H. Bates, d., Rochester 
District No. 21 

■ George Ira Leighton, r., Dover 
District No. 22 

Daniel M. Boyd, r. and p., London- 
derry 
District No. 23 

Clarence M. Collins, r. and p., Dan- 
ville 
District No. 24 

Calvin Page, d., Portsmouth 



486 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Representatives. 

Speaker, Arthur P. Morrill, r., Concord 
ROCKINGHAM COUNTY. 

Atkinson, Herbert N. Sawyer r Newmarket, George M. Mathes d 

Auburn, Willard H. Griffin d Albert F. Priest d 

Brentwood, Burton L. Smith r Arthur L. Turcotte . . . . d 

Candia, Benjamin F. Lang d Newton, Hayford Battles r 

Chester, George E. Gillingham r North Hampton, Alfred L. Marston, d 

Deerfield, Joseph W. Sanborn r Northwood, John G. Towle r 

Derry, Warren P. Home d Nottingham, Arthur W. McDaniel . . . r 

Myron Richardson d Plaistow, Fred P. Hill r and p 

Benjamin F. Stackhouse d Portsmouth — 

Henry T. Wheeler d Ward 1, George H. Sanderson. . .r 

East Kingston, Frank B. Tilton. . . .d Lewis Soule d 

Epping, George A. Gilmore d Ward 2, John H. Bartlett r 

Exeter, Samuel K. Bell r John Pender r 

Luke Leighton r George A. Wood r 

Edward E. Nowell r Ward 3, Daniel W. Badger d 

Richard E. Shute r William Casey d 

Fremont, Joseph P. Bassett r Ward 4, Edward S. Downs r 

Greenland, Edward W. Holmes r Ward 5, Ralph C. Dickey r 

Hampstead, Albion D. Emerson. .. .r Raymond, George E. Dodge d 

Hampton, Edwin L. Batchelder. . .i. d Rye, Joseph W. Berry r 

Hampton Falls, William E. Walton, .r Salem, Walter F. Haigh r and p 

Kensington, Herman E. Brown d Fred C. Buxton r 

Kingston, Frank W. Parker r Sandown, George W. Dimmock d 

Londonderry, Eugene O. Greeley. . . .r Seabrook, Lucien Wilbur Foote. . . .d 

Newcastle, James W. Pridham. . . .d. Stratham, Joseph G. Barnard d 

Windham, Rufus H. Bailey r 

STRAFFORD COUNTY. 

Barrington, Frank McDaniel, r and d Durham, Fred E. Davis d 

Dover — Farmington, Edwin H. Thomas r 

Ward 1, Charles E. Wendell r James W. Ham r 

Martin P. Bennett r Lee, Frank J. Davis r 

Ward 2, Eugene B. Foss r Madbury, Albert D. Emerson d 

Eugene Smart r Milton, Moses G. Chamberlain r 

John McFadyen r Rochester — 

Ward 3, Edwin M. Carr r Ward 1, Wilbur F. Cole r 

Edward Reilly r Ward 2, Edward L. Tebbetts. . . .d 

Ward 4, Fred L. Morang. .r -and d Ward 3, Harry L. Meader r 

James Marshall. . .r and p Ward 4, Alcide Bilodeau r 

David C. Mcintosh r Edward P. Maxfield r 

Ward 5, John H. Wesley, .r and d Ward 5. Luther B. Sampson r 



ISTEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



487 



Ward 6 ; Roy C. Home r 

John M. Hubbard r 

Rollinsford, Cornelius E. Murphy... d 

James F. Philpott d 

Somersworth — 



Ward 2, John F. Lucey d 

Ward 3, Laurent J. Gaudreau...d 

Ward 4, John J. McCarthy d 

William Perron d 

Ward 5, Peter M. Gagne. . .r and d 



Ward 1, Archie L. Jacques d Strafford, John W. Cater r 

BELKNAP COUNTY. 



Alton, Wm. Rockwell Clough, r and p 

Barnstead, George J. Whitney r 

Belmont, Jason H. Cotton d 

Center Harbor, 

Leonard B. Morrill r and d 

Gilford, Orman M. Sanborn, r and p 

Gilmanton, Royal L. Page r 

Laconia — 

Ward 1, John T. Dodge d 

Ward 2, William B. Johnson r 

Arthur W. Spring r 

Ward 3, Thomas H. Lowe r 



Laconia — 

Ward 4, Edwin H. Shannon r 

William F. Seaverns . . . .r 

Ward 5, Frank E. Pearson r 

Archie B. Sanborn r 

Ward 6, George B. Munsey r 

Simon A. Whitten r 

Meredith, Dudley Leavitt r 

New Hampton, Guy B. Torsey d 

Sanbornton, Robert M. Wright r 

Tilton, Herman Page d 

Charles E. Tilton d 



CARROLL COUNTY. 

Bartlett, Austin L. Stillings d Moultonborough, 

Conway, Albert S. Pollard r James E. French r and d 

Charles E. Poole r Ossipee, Ervin W. Hodsdon r 

William R. Carter d Sandwich, Harry Blanchard d 

Eaton, Fred E. White r Tamworth, Charles C. Smith d 

Effingham, Edwin F. Leavitt r Tuftonboro, Willie W. Thomas d 

Freedom, Arthur P. Merrow d Wakefield, William N. Rogers d 

Jackson, Harry A. Thompson r Wolfeboro, John Frank Goodwin. . . .r 

Madison, Samuel J. Gilman .t Henry F. Libby r 

MERRIMACK COUNTY. 



Allenstown, Fred S. Eastman r 

Andover, George E. Eastman d 

Boscawen, Guy H. Hubbard r 

Bow, Fred H. Clough d 

Bradford, Hugh Corrigan d 

Canterbury, Leroy A. Glines. .r and d 
Chichester, Marshall S. Sanborn.... r 
Concord — 

Ward 1, Lawrence J. Keenan,...d 
William F. Hoyt d 



Ward 2, 
Ward 3, 
Ward 4, 



Ward 



Frank P. Curtis d 

Robert C. Murchie d 

Ira Leon Evans r 

Herbert H. Wright r 

Eugene W. Leach, r and p 
Ward 5, Benjamin W. Couch. . . .r 

Arthur P. Morrill r 

Arthur E. Dole r 

Clarence L. Clark d 

Fred B. Taylor d 



488 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Ward 7, John G. Winant r 

Walter H. Beane r 

Julius Percy Holbrook. .r 

Ward 8, William A. Lee d 

Ward 9, William J. Ahern d 

James J. Gannon d 

Danbury, Burt W. Dean d 

Dunbarton, Abraham L. Burnham...r 

Epsom, Benjamin M. Towle r 

Franklin — 

Ward 1, Peter Dana d 

Ward 2, Pat'k J. Cunningham ... d 

Maxime A. Proulx d 

Ward 3, Walter F. Duffy, .r and p 
Gilbert G. Fellows ..... d 

Henniker, Harrie W. Balch d 

Hill, Alfred M. Kelley r 



Hooksett, Guy M. Lawrence .r 

Hopkinton, Robert T. Gould, d and p 

Loudon, Everett P. Jenkins r 

Newbury, Elwin C. Lear r 

New London, Elmer E. Adams.... r 

Northfield, Jeremiah E. Smith r 

Pembroke, Lawrence C. Bates d 

Amedee Fremeau d 

George F. Georgi d 

Pittsfield, Rich'd B. Bartlett, r and p 

Frank M. Cutler d 

Salisbury, Ned D. Sanborn, r and d 

Sutton, Arthur E. Davis d 

Warner, Andrew J. Hook r 

Webster, James L. Colby r 

Wilmot, William A. Thompson r 



HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY. 



Amherst, Jonathan S. Lewis, r and p 

Antrim, Charles D. White d 

Bedford, William B. French r 

Bennington, Herbert A. Eaton r 

Brookline, Walter E. Corey r 

Deering, Harlan C. Smith ind 

Francestown, Edwin D. Stevens r 

Goffstown, Robert M. Gordon r 

Lucian W. Bartlett ..... r 

Greenfield, Edwin C. Hopkins d 

Greenville, Louis O. Boisvert d 

Hancock, Clark S. Ellinwood d 

Hillsborough, John S. Childs r 

Frank D. Gay. r 

Hollis, Edwin H. Stratton r 

Hudson, Henry C. Brown. . . .r and d 
Lyndeborough, Charles H. Tarbell, r 
Manchester — 

Ward 1, Bayard C. Ryder, r and p 

Harry E. Cole r 

Robert E. Wheeler r 

Ward 2, Henry W. Boutwell. . . .r 

Ralph E. Hall r 

Henry F. Berry r 

George Allen Putnam. . . .r 



Ward 3, Tom W. Robinson, r and p 

Eugene G. Libbey r 

William E. Smith r 

George E. Prime r 

John G. Crawford, r and p 
Carl A. Peterson r 

Ward 4, Clarence M. Woodbury, .r 
Henry B. Fairbanks. .. .r 
Frank A. Dockham, r, p 
Frank H. Challis, r and p 
Charles E. Crosby r 

Ward 5 — James H. Collins d 

Maurice J. Connor d 

James L. Glynn d 

Peter E. Harlan d 

Richard H. Horan d 

John F. Kelley d 

Daniel J. McCarthy d 

Patrick McGreevy *d 
John Shaughnessy d 

Ward 6, John H. Bartlett r 

Robert Bunton. . .r and p 
Charles G. Dunnington. .r 
James M. Nelson . . r and p 
Arthur E. Wiggin r 



e Died January 4, 1917. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 489 



Ward 7 — John M. Ready d Milford, Pulaski R. Woodman, r and p 

Michael T. Sullivan d Mont Vernon, Jay M. Gleason r 

Martin L. Mahoney. , . . .d Nashua — 
Ward 8 — Michael S. Donnelly. . .d Ward 1, Herb't E. Kendall, rand p 

Albert J. Parent d Henry C. Shattuck r 

John H. Rice d Ward 2, Amos J. Wheeler r 

Thomas R. Stewart. .. .d Robert A. French r 

Ward 9, William B. McKay r Ward 3, Joseph Pepin d 

James A. Sayers r Noe Richard d 

Charles W. Bailey r John B. Riendeau d 

William A. Burlingame . . r Ward 4, William E. Foisie r 

Samuel F. Davis r Ward 5, Thomas McLaughlin . . . .d 

Ward 10 — Harry C. Jones r Michael P. Sullivan. .. .d 

Charles A. Newell r Ward 6, Matthew T. Sullivan... d 

Theodore Graf r Ward 7. Frank O. Morse d 

Ward 11 — John L. Barry d Thomas F. Mulvanity..d 

George E. Roukey d Charles H. Powell d 

Dennis F. Scannell r Ward 8, Henry M. Burns d 

Ward 12 — Frank G. Lizotte r Barth'mew J. Hargraves, d 

George Provost r Irenee D. Ravenelle d 

Alphonse Grenier r Ward 9, Edward DeLacombe. . . .d 

Rene Janelle d Auguste Gaudreau d 

Ward 13 — Treffle Raiche r Joseph Larouche d 

Ferdinand Farley t George L. Soucy d 

Ubald Hebert r New Boston, Charles F. Marden. . . .r 

Charles Miville r New Ipswich, Phillip F. Gordon, r, d 

Omer Janelle d Pelham, Frank M. Woodbury, r and d 

Mason, Hervey E. Whitaker, r and d Peterborough, AndreAv J. Walbridge, r 

Merrimack, John E. Haseltine r James F. Brennan . . . .d 

Milford, Fred J. Kendall.... r and p. Weare, George H. Eastman d 

Joseph A. Mallalieu r Wilton, Stanley H. Abbot. . . .r and p 

CHESHIRE COUNTY. ( 

Alstead, Henry C. Metcalf d Keene — 

Chesterfield, Harold E. Randall. . . .r Ward 3, Herman C. Rice. . .r and p 

Dublin, Milton D. Mason, r, d and p Ward 4, William S. Tuttle r 

Fitzwilliam. Clarence M. Damon... r Ward 5, Daniel M. Spaulding. . . .r 

Gilsum, Elmer D. Banks d Marlborough, John Kimball r 

Harrisville, Frank P. Symonds r Marlow, Warren M. Davis r 

Hinsdale, Orren C. Robertson, r and d Richmond, Albert B. Conway r 

Jaffrey, John G. Townsend r Rindge, Harris H. Rice. . . .r, d and p 

Edward C. Boynton d Swanzey, Frank S. Faulkner. ..... .d 

Keene — Troy, George W. Mason d 

Ward 1, Walter G. Perry. . .r and p Walpole, William H. Lane r 

Wm. J. Callahan, r and p George F. Landers d 

Ward 2, Jerry P. Wellman r Westmoreland, Asa A. Whitman.... r 

Charles Warren d Winchester, Franklin J. Willard. . . .r 

Ward 3, Frank Huntress .. .r and p Edward F. Qualters . . . . d 



490 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



SULLIVAN COUNTY. 

Acworth, March Clark d Langdon, Bayard T. Mousley d 

Charlestown, Wiiliam H. Gilson. . . .r Lempster, Lucius H. Nichols d 

Claremont, Edgar A. Noyes r Newport, George A. Fairbanks r 

Edward J. Rossiter r Elmer E. Dodge r 

Edwin A. Thomas d Leroy C. Angell r 

Robert E. Gould d Plainfield, Fred A. Rogers r 

Orra S. Bugbee d Springfield, Carl B, Philbrick, r and d 

Herbert C. Chandler. .. .d Sunapee, George E. Gardner d 

Cornish, William E. Beaman r Unity, Frank Reed r 

Croydon. Dana S. Gross r and p Washington, no certificate issued. 

Goshen, John S. Smart r 

GRAFTON COUNTY. 

Alexandria, Joel S. Gray d Lebanon, Karl E. Allen d 

Ashland, Theron B. A. Baker d Frank Collins d 

Bath, no certificate issued. Lincoln, John Taylor Alton r 

Bethlehem, Walter H. Clark d Lisbon, Fred J. Moore r and p 

Bristol, John S. Conner. . d Herbert B. Moulton d 

Campton, Samuel P. Robie r Littleton, Edward J. Cummings . . . .d 

Canaan, William E. Shaw r Harvey C. Kinne d 

Enfield, Stephen Laffee r William I. Richardson. . .d 

Franconia, Fred G. Sanborn d Lyman, William Birch, Jr d 

Grafton, Alden H. Barney r Lyme, George W. Barnes r 

Groton, George C. Goodboo r Orange, Melvin B. Eastman d 

Hanover, Horace F. Hoyt r Orford, Harry E. Morrison r 

Charles F. Emerson, r and p Piermont, Orlo B. Stanley d 

Haverhill, Frank N. Keyser, r and p Plymouth, Ernest L. Bell....r and p 
Lxither C. Butler, .r and p Edward C. Brogan d 

Henry S. Bailey r Rumney, Daniel Kidder d 

Holderness, Harold A. Webster r Thornton, Frank L. Hazeltine r 

Lebanon, Horace French r Warren, Charles F. Little r 

Eben S. Haskell r Wentwortb, Frank C. Bradeen, r and p 

Ralph F. Hough. . . .r and p Woodstock, Albert W. Sawyer r 

COOS COUNTY. 

Berlin — Carroll, Edward W. Burns d 

Ward 1, Joseph Aubin d Colebrook, Guy B. Trask r 

Waldo Babson '. . .d John H. Finley r 

Arthur P. Smyth d Columbia, William Gray r 

Ward 2, Joseph W. Gonya d Dalton, Amos L. Brown r 

George H. Gagne d Gorham, Joseph 0. George d 

William G. Dupont r Bartholomew F. McHugh, d 

Ward 3, Andrew P. Bergquist. . .r Jefferson, Richard B. Eastman r 

Paul W. Burbank r Lancaster, Fred C. Congdon r 

Octave J. Lambert r Abner Bailey r 

Ward 4, Arthur J. Letourneau. . .d Daniel J. Truland r 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



491 



Milan, Ruel A. Woods r Shelburne, Charles E. Philbrook. . . .r 

Northumberland, Joseph P, Boucher, i Stark, Ira N. Cole d 

Jas. B. McFarland, i Stewartstown, Levi Brooks r 

Pittsburg, Charles Merrill r Stratford, William H. Kimball d 

Randolph, Vyron D. Lowe r Whitefield, Elbridge W. Snow, r and p 



EMPLOYEES OF THE LEGISLATURE, 1917. 
Senate. 



Office. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Clerk 


Earle C. Gordon 


Canaan 


Assistant Clerk 


Thomas P. Cheney. . . . 


Ashland 


Sergeant-at-Arms 


William H. Knox 


Madbury 


Doorkeeper 


Clarence S. Forsaith. . 


Manchester 








Assistant Messenger. . . 


Frederick E. Cilley... 


Concord 


Telephone Messenger. . 


Ralph W. Cate 


Franklin 


Stenographers 


Bessie A. Callaghan . . . 


Manchester 




Ella M. Wardner 


Concord 



House of Representatives. 



Office. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Clerk 


Harrie M. Young 


Manchester 


Assistant Clerk 


Bernard W. Carey. . . . 


Newport 


Sergeant-at-Arms 


Walter J. A. Ward. . . 


Hillsborough 


Chaplain 


Chellis V. Smith 


Plaistow 


Custodian of Mail and 






Supplies 


Oscar C. Nims 


Keene 


Doorkeepers ......... 


William W. Pike 


Northumberland 




George Lawrence 


Manchester 




Guy S. Neal 


Acworth 




Harry J. A. Robinson. 


Dover 


Warden of Coat Room. 


Edwin L. Dickerson . . 


Lisbon 


Ass't Ward. Coat Room 


George A. Kemp 


Concord 


Library Messenger .... 


Fred W. Lamb 


Manchester 


Telephone Messenger. . 


Mott L. Bartlett. .... 


Sunapee 


Stenographers ....... 


Frances Clark 


Laconia 




Lizzie H. Sanborn. . . . 


Hopkinton 




Marion L. Corser 


Concord 


Pages 


Howard E. Nelson. . . . 


Portsmouth 




Raymond W. Carter. . . 


Moultonborough 




John Ross 


Nashua 




Maurice L. Stickney. . . 


Manchester 




Edison J. Minah 


Franklin 


Speaker's Page 


Joseph H. Lane 


Concord 



492 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Elected November 7, 1916. 



COUNTY 



County. 



Rockingham. 

Strafford 

Belknap. . . . 

Carroll 

Merrimack . . 

Hillsborough 
Cheshire. . . . 

Sullivan .... 

G-raf ton 

Coos 



Sheriff. 



$600 and Fees. 

Ceylon Spinney, r. 

Portsmouth. 

$400 and Fees.. 

Edward S. Young, r. 

Dover. 

$200 and Fees. 
Fred'k D. Elliott, r. 

Laconia. 

$200 and Fees. 

A. W. Chandler, d. 

Conway. 

$600 and Fees. 

Charles P. Smith, r. 

Concord. 

$800 and Fees. 
John T. O'Dowd, d. 

Manchester. 

$500 and Fees. 
Edward H. Lord, r. 

Keene. 

$3 00 and Fees. 

Albert I. Barton, r. 

Croydon. 

$600 and Fees. 

Jos. P. Huckins, r. 

Plymouth. 

$800 and Fees. 

George W. Brown, r. 

Berlin. 



Solicitor. 



Wm. H. Sleeper, r. 
Exeter. 



Albert P. Sherry, r. 
Dover. 

$500. 

Fletcher Hale, r. 

Laconia. 

$600. 

Walter D. H. Hill, r. 

Conway. 

$800. 

Wm. W. Thayer, r. 

Concord. 

$1,800. 

John R. Spring, r. 

Nashua. 

$600. 

Philip H. Faulkner, r. 

Keene. 

$500. 

H. S. Richardson, r. 

Claremont. 

$800. 

Raymond U. Smith, r. 

Haverhill. 

$800. 

Harry G. Noyes, d. 

Gorham. 



Treasurer. 



$500. 

Stewart E. Rowe, r. 

Exeter. 

$400. 

Frank N. French, r. 

Dover. 

$200. 

Chas. J. Hayford, r. 

Laconia. 

$300. 

Samuel A. Hidden, r. 

Tamworth. 

$300. 

Harry F. Davis, r. 

Franklin. 

$700. 

Albert H. White, r. 

Manchester. 

$200. 

Wallace L. Mason, r. 

Keene. 

$200. 

Walter H. Perry, r. 

Charlestown. 

$300. 

Earnest H. Hallett, r. 

Lisbon. 

$200. 

David W. Coffey, d. 

Berlin. 









NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



493 



OFFICERS, 



Term, April 1, 1917-April 1, 1919. 



Register of Deeds. 



Fees. 
John W. A. Green, r. 

Exeter. 

Fees. 

George G. Welch, r. 

Dover. 

Fees. 

Herbert M. Thyng. r. 

New Hampton. 

Fees. 

Fred R. Eastman, r. 

Ossipee. 

Fees. 

Edmund H. Brown, r. 

Concord. 

Fees. 

Calvin R. Wood. r. 

Nashua. 

Fees. 

Charles C. Buffum, r. 

K>ene. 

Fees. 

C. W. Rounsevel, r. 

Newport. 

Fees. 

Wm. J. Randolph, r. 

Plymouth. 

Fees. 

Edward J. Daley, d. 

Stratford. 



Register of Probate. 



$1,200. 

Robert Scott, r. 

Exeter. 

$1,000. 

Wm. W. Martin, r. 

Dover. 

$600. 

Thomas C. Hill, r. 

Laconia. 

$600. 

Charles S. Miles, r. 

Ossipee. 

$1,200. 

I. Eugene Keeler, r. 

Concord. 

$1,500. 

Elbridge J. Copp, r. 

Nashua. 

$600. i 
Adolf W. Pressler, r. 
Keene. 

$600. 

Elisha M. Kempton, r. 

Newport. 

$1,000. 

Russell T. Bartlett, r. 

Haverhill. 

$900. 

Fielding Smith, r. 

Lancaster. 



Commissioners. ' 



Norman H. Beane, r., Portsmouth 
George A. Carlisle, r., Exeter 

William B. Underhill, r., Chester 

Lorenzo E. Baer, r., Rollinsford 
Lewis A. Scruton, r., Dover 

James B. Young, r., Rochester 

A. C. S. Randlett, r., Laconia 

Stephen L. Weeks, r., Gilmanton 
Walter C. Wyatt, r., Tilton 

Geo. A. Blanchard. r., Moultonboro 
John E. Perkins, r., Freedom 

Arthur R. Shirley, r., Conway 

Arthur H. Britton, r., Concord 

John F. Jewell, r., Warner 

John G. McQuilkin, r., Concord 

Albert T. Barr, r., Manchester 

James H. Hunt, r., Nashua 

Edson H. Patch, r., Francestown 

Frank A. Davis, r., Hinsdale 

Charles M. Norwood, r., Keene 

Marquis O. Spaulding, r., Keene 

Frederick W. Aiken, r., Newport 
William W. Ballock, r., Cornish 

H. C. Sanders, Sr., r., Claremont 



Ora A. Brown, r., 
Harry E. Morrison, r. 
George H. Turner, r., 



Ashland 

Orford 

Bethlehem 



Alba C. Hicks, d., Colebrook 

Frank D. Page, r., Whitefield 

Joseph A. Vaillancourt, r., Berlin 



*Salary, $3.00 per day and expenses, except in Hillsborough County, 
$1,500 per year and expenses; Merrimack County, $1,000 per year and 
expenses; Cheshire County, $500 per year and expenses. 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Adjutant-General, Office of 152 

Adjutant-Generals, List of (1777-1917) 152 

Agriculture, College of (see State College). 

Commissioners of (1871-1917) 199 

Department of, History of. 199 

Arbitration and Conciliation, Board of 204 

Assistant Attorney-General (1915-1917) 193 

Associate Justices of Supreme Court (1693-1917) 189-191 

Superior Court (1813-1917) 191-192 

Asylum, Insane (see Hospital). 

Attorney-Generals (1682-1917) 192-193 

Automobile Department, see Motor Vehicles. 

Ballot Law Commission, History of 203 

Commissioners (1892-1917) . . . 203 

Bank Commission, History of 193 

Members of (1837-1917) 194-195 

Belknap County, History of 16 

Population of (1775-1917) 84-85 

Bill of Rights 106-111 

Board, Dental (see Dental Board). 

of Arbitration and Control . . . t 204 

Control (see Trustees of Institutions). 
Equalization (see Tax Commission). 
Health, State (see Health, Dept. of). 

Medical Examiners, History of 205 

Members of (1897-1917) 205 

Veterinary Examiners (see Veterinary Examining Board). 
Optometry (see Optometry Board). 

Branches of Government, Ballot Law Commission 203 

Bank Commission 193-195 

Board of Medical Examiners 205 

Bureau of Labor 204 

Commission of Pharmacy and Practical Chem- 
istry 199-200 

Councilors 141-148 

Dental Board 203 



495 



496 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Page. 

Branches of Government, Department of Agriculture 199 

Charities and Corrections 204 

Health 201 

Institutions 208-215 

Motor Vehicles . 215 

Public Instruction 198-199 

Records 202 

State 149-150 

Excise Commission 207 

Fish and Game Department 198 

Forestry Department 201-202 

Governor 134-140 

Highway Department 207 

Insurance Department 197 

Judiciary . . . 187-192 

Law Department 192-193 

Legislature 152-187 

House of Representatives 184-187 

Senate 157-184 

Militia 152 

Optometry Board 207 

Printing Commission 206 

Public Service Commission 195-197 

Tax Commission 200 

Treasury 151-152 

Veterinary Examining Board 205-206 

Bureau of Labor, Board of Arbitration of 204 

Commissioners of (1893-1917) 204 

History of 204 

Capitol, State (see State House). 

Carroll County, History of 16 

Population of (1775-1917) 86-87 

Charities and Corrections, Department of, History of 204 

Secretaries of (1895-1917).. . 204 

Cheshire County, History of 16 

Population of (1775-1917) 96-97 

Chief Justices of Superior Court (1813-1917) 188-189 

Supreme Court (1693-1917) 191 

Circuit Court, Federal, Judges of 268 

State (1813-1816; 1842-1849; 1851-1859; 1874-1876) 

History of 188 

Cities, History of 16-20 

Clerks of Courts, Constitutional Provisions Regarding 125 

College, State (see State College). 

Colonial Legislature, Sessions of. ... 153 

Commissary-General, Constitutional Provisions Regarding 123 

Commission of Lunacy (see Health, Dept. of). 

Pharmacy and Practical Chemistry, History of 199 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



497 



Page. 

Commissioners, Agriculture 199 

Ballot Law 203 

Bank 194-195 

Excise 207 

Fish and Game 198 

Forestry 202 

Highway 207 

Insurance 197 

Labor 204 

Motor Vehicle 215 

Pharmacy 200 

Printing 206 

Public Service 195-197 

Tax 200 

Common Pleas, Court of (see Superior Court). 

Congress, Provincial, Sessions of 153 

Congressmen from N. H. in Continental Congress (1774-1788) 217 

House of Representatives (1789-1917) . . . .217-220 

Constitution, State 106-129 

History of 129-133 

Constitutional Convention Vote (1916) 379-385 

Conventions, History of 129-133 

Government, Form of 111-129 

Consumptives, Sanatorium for (see Sanatorium for Consumptives). 

Contest over State Capitol 74 

Control, Board of (see Trustees of Institutions). 

Convention, Provincial, Sessions of 153 

Conventions, Constitutional (see Constitutional Conventions). 

Coos County, History of 16 

Population of (1775-1917) 104-105 

Council Chamber, Diagram of 138 

Council, Executive, Constitutional Proyisions Regarding 122-123 

Councilor, Office of 141 

Councilors, List of (1776-1917) 141-148 

Counties, History of 15-16 

County Officers, Constitutional Provisions Regarding 123 

List of, 1917 492-493 

Court, Federal 268 

State 188 

Court of Common Pleas (see Superior Court). 

Sessions, History of (1820-1824) 188 

Declaration of Independence, New Hampshire 130 

Democratic Platform, 1916 270-272 

State Committee, Chairmen of (1856-1917) 277 

Members of 1916 274-275 

Secretaries of (1858-1917) 277 

Treasurers of (1876-1917) 278 

Dental Board, History of 203 



498 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Page. 

Dental Board, Members of (1891-1917) . . . , 203 

Department of Agriculture 199 

Charities and Corrections 204 

Fish and Game 198 

Forestry 201-202 

Health 201 

Highways 207 

Institutions 208-215 

Insurance 197 

Law 192-193 

Motor Vehicles 215 

Public Instruction 198-199 

Records 202 

Deputy Secretary of State 150 

Constitutional Provisions Regarding 123 

Treasurer 152 

Diagram of Council Chamber 138 

Representatives' Hall 75 

Senate Chamber 484 

District Court, Federal, Meetings of 268 

Officers of 268 

State, History of (1816-1820) 188 

Durham, College at (see State College). 

Election Returns, (1916), Presidential Primary 226-265 

State Primary 278-352 

State 353-438 

Congressional vote 379-385 

Constitutional Convention vote 379-385 

Councilor vote 386-390 

County vote 415-438 

Gubernatorial vote 368-378 

Legislative vote 391-414 

License vote 379-385 

Presidential vote 368-378 

Senatorial vote 391-402 

Elections (1788-1916), Gubernatorial 136-140 

Presidential (see Presidential Elections). 

Electors, Presidential (1788-1916) 220-226 

Vote of (1916) 353 

Embalmers, Examiners of (see Health, Dept of). 
Equalization, Board of (see Tax Commission). 
Examiners of Embalmers (see Health, Dept. of). 
Medical (see Medical Examiners). 
Veterinary (see Veterinary Examiners). 

Excise Commission, History of 207 

License Vote (1916) 379-385 

Commissioners (1903-1917) 207 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 499 

Page. 

Executive (see Governor). 

Council (see Council, Executive). 

Federal Court Organization, Curcuit Court 268 

Judges of 268 

District Court 268 

Officers of 268 

Meetings of 268 

Feeble-Minded, School for (see School for Feeble-Minded) . 

First Constitution of New Hampshire 129 

Governor of New Hampshire 8 

Settlement in New Hampshire 8 

Fish and Game Department, Commissioners of (1866-1917) 198 

History of 198 

in New Hampshire 7 

Flag, State 73 

Forester, State 202 

Forestry Department, Commissioners of (1881-1917) 202 

History of 201 

Form of Government, Constitutional 111-129 

General Court (see Legislature). 

Geographical Location of New Hampshire 5 

Glencliff Sanatorium (see Sanatorium for Consumptives). 

Government, State (see Branches of Government). 

Governor, Constitutional Provisions Regarding 118-121 

Office of 134 

Vote for (1785-1916) 136-140, 354, 368-378 

Governors, List of (1680-1917) 135-136 

Grafton County, History of 16 

Population of (1775-1917) 100-103 

Gubernatorial Vote 1916 (see Governor,). 

Health, Department of, History of 201 

Members of (1881-1917) 201 

Highway Department, Commissioners of (1903-1917) 207 

History of 207 

Hiilsborough County, History of 16 

Population of (1775-1917) 88-91 

Historical Sketch of New Hampshire 8-73 

History of Branches of Government 133-215 

Cities 16-20 

Counties 15-16 

Towns 20-71 

Unincorporated Places 71-73 

Hospital, The, History of 209-211 

Superintendents of (1842-1917) 211 

House of Representatives (see also Representatives). 

Constitutional Provision Regarding 113-115 



500 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Page. 

House of Representatives for the Colony, Sessions of 153 

History of 186 

Members of, 1917 486-491 

Speakers of (1684-1915) 184-186 

Hygiene, Laboratory of (see Health, Dept. of). 

Indexer of Records 202 

Industrial School, History of 211-212 

Superintendents of (1858-1917) 212 

Insane Hospital (see Hospital). 

Institutions, Department of, History of 208 

Hospital 209-211 

Industrial School 211-212 

Prison 209 

Sanatorium for Consumptives 214-215 

School for Feeble-Minded 213 

Trustees of (1913-1917) 208-209 

Insurance Commissioners (1852-1917) 197 

Department, History of 197 

Introduction 3 

Judges of Federal Court 268 

State Court (1693-1917) 188-192 

Judiciary, Constitutional Provisions Regarding 124-125 

History of 187-188 

Members of (1693-1917) 188-192 

Organization of (1917) 461-470 

Keene Normal School, History of 212 

Principals of (1909-1917) 213 

Laboratory of Hygiene (see Health, Dept. of). 

Labor, Bureau of, Board of Arbitration of 204 

History of 204 

Commissioners (1893-1917) 204 

Law Department, Assistant Attorney-General of (1915-1917) 193 

Attorney-Generals of (1682-1917) 192 

History of 192 

Legislative Organization, 1917 483-491 

Legislature, Colonial, Sessions of 153 

Constitutional Provisions Regarding 111-118 

House of Representatives 184-187 

No. of Members in 78-105 

Senate 157-184 

Sessions of (1776-1917) 153-156 

Librarians, State (1866-1917) 211 

Library, State, History of 211 

Librarians of (1866-1917) 211 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 501 

Page. 
License Commission (see Excise Commission). 

Vote, 1916 379-385 

Liquor Traffic, Regulation of (see Excise Commission). 
Lunacy, Commission of (see Health, Dept. of). 

Meetings of District Court 268 

Medical Examiners, Board of, History of 205 

Members of (1897-1917) 205 

Merrimack County, History of 16 

Population of (1775-1917) 92-95 

Military Roster, 1917 471-482 

Militia, State, History of 152 

Motor Vehicles, Commissioners of (1915-1917) 215 

Department of, History of 215 

New Hampshire College, History of 214 

Presidents of (1866-1917) 214 

Declaration of Independence 130 

First Constitution of 129 

Governor of 8 

Settlement in 8 

Geographical Location of 5 

History (see Historical Sketch). 

Names given to 5 

Postoffices 266-268 

Royal Province of, 1679 10 

Normal Schools, Keene 212-213 

Plymouth 212 

Officers, State, 1917 (see State Officers). 

Optometry Board, History of 207 

Members of (1911-1917) 208 

Party Platforms, 1916 269-272 

Democratic 270-272 

Republican 269-270 

Pharmacy and Practical Chemistry, Commission of, History of 199 

Commissioners of (1875-1917) 200 

Plymouth Normal School, History of 212 

Principals of (1871-1917) 212 

Population Statistics 77 

of Belknap County 84-85 

Carroll County 86-87 

Cheshire County 96-97 

Coos County 104-105 

Grafton County 100-103 

Hillsborough County 88 91 

Merrimack County 92 95 



502 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 

Page. 

Population Statistics of Places over 2,500 76 

Rockingham County 78-81 

Strafford County 82-83 

Sullivan County 98-99 

Postoffices in New Hampshire 266-268 

Presidents of Senate 182-184 

State College 214 

State (see Governor). 

Presidential Elections (1788-1916), History of 220 

Vote in 220-226 

Electors (see Electors, Pres.). 

Primary, Mar. 14, 1916 226 

Vote, Democratic 242-256 

Progressive 257-265 

Republican 227-241 

Vote, 1916 354 

by Counties 368-378 

Primary, Presidential (see Presidential Primary). 
State (see State Primary). 

Principals of Keene Normal School 213 

Plymouth Normal School 212 

Printing Commission, History of 206 

Members of (1901-1917) 206 

Prison, History of 209 

Wardens of (1812-1917) 209 

Provincial Congress, Sessions of 153 

Convention, Sessions of 153 

Public Instruction, Department of, History of 198 

Superintendents of (1868-1917) 199 

Service Commission, History of 195 

Members of (1838-1917) 195-197 

Railroad Commission (see Public Service Commission). 

Records, Department of, History of 202 

Indexers of (1883-1917) 202 

Representatives to Congress (see Congressmen). 

Constitutional Provisions Regarding 113-115 

Election of, 1916 403-414 

Hall, Diagram of 75 

House of, History of 186-187 

Members of, 1917 486-491 

Speakers of (1684-1917) 184-186 

Number of (1784-1917) 78-105, 187 

Republican Platform of 1916 269-270 

State Committee, Chairmen of (1856-1917) 275 

Members of, 1916 272-274, 

Secretaries of (1856-1917) 276 

Treasurers of (1858-1917) 276 



NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 503 



Page. 

Returns, Election, of Pres. Primary 226-265 

State Election 353-438 

Primary 278-352 

Rockingham County, History of 15 

Population of (1775-1917) 78-81 

Royal Province of New Hampshire (1679) 10 

Sanatorium for Consumptives, History of 214 

Supt. of 215 

School for Feeble-Minded, History of 213 

Supt. of (1903-1917) 213 

Industrial (see Industrial School). 

Schools, Normal, Keene 213 

Plymouth 212 

Secretaries of Dept. of Charities and Corrections 214 

State, List of (1680-1917) 149-150 

Deputy (1794-1917) 150 

Secretary of State, Constitutional Provisions Regarding 123 

Office of 149 

Senate Chamber, Diagram of 484 

Senate, Constitutional Provisions Regarding 115-118 

Members of (1784-1917) 157-182, 485 

Presidents of (1784-1917) 182-184 

Senators, United States, History of 215 

List of 215-216 

Sessions, Court of, History of (1820-1824) 188 

Socialist Organization, 1916 275 

Speakers of The House of Representatives 184-186 

State Board of Health (see Health, Dept. of). 

College, History of 214 

Presidents of (1866-1917) 214 

Committee, 1916, Democratic . ' 274-275 

Republican 272-274 

Socialist 275 

Constitution 106-129 

History of 129-133 

Court 188 

Department of 149-150 

Election, 1916 353-438 

Summary of 353-367 

Flag 73 

Forester 202 

Government (see Branches of Goverment). 
Hospital (see Hospital). 

House 73-74 

Contest over 74 

Militia 152 

Officers 1917, List of 439-460 

Primary September, 1916 278-352 

Senate (see Senate). 



504 NEW HAMPSHIRE MANUAL. 



Page. 

State Treasurer, Constitutional Provision Regarding 123 

Office of 151 

Treasurers, Deputy (1892-1917) 152 

List of (1680-1917) 151-152 

Strafford County, History of 15 

Population of (1775-1917) 82-83 

Sullivan County, History of 16 

Population of (1775-1917) 98-99 

Summer Resorts 6 

Superintendent of Highway 207 

Hospital 211 

Industrial School 212 

Public Instruction 199 

Sanatorium for Consumptives 215 

School for Feeble-Minded 213 

Superior Court, Asso. Justices of (1813-1917) 191-192 

Chief Justices of (1813-1917) 191 

History of 187-188 

of Judicature, Provincial, History of (1693-1776) .... 187-188 
State, History of (1776-1813), (1816- 

1865), (1874-1876) 187-188 

Supreme Court, Asso. Justices of (1693-1917) 189-191 

Chief Justices of (1693-1917) 188-189 

History of 187-188 

Judicial Court, History of (1813-1816), (1855-1874) 187-188 

Tax Commission, History of 200 

Members of (1897-1917) 200 

Towns, History of 20-71 

Population of (1775-1917) 78-105 

(1917) 20-71 

Treasurer, State (see State Treasurer). 

Trustees of Institutions 208 

Unincorporated places, History of 71-73 

United States Senators from New Hampshire (see Senators). 

Veterinary Examining Board, History of 205 

Members of (1901-1917) 206 

Vote cast at Elections, 1916 (see Elections). 

Wardens of Prison (1812-1917) 209